Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 05-10-2015, 05:50   #1
RKO
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Louisville KY, on the muddy Ohio
Boat: Columbia 8.7
Posts: 124
Soon to be cruiser question

I've been an inactive member of this board off and on for the past years. I can retire in August of 2016 with a pension of ab about $4000 a month, no debt.
I started sailing about 20 years ago, self taught. I've owned several boats. From as small as a 23 foot racer to a 36 ft Columbia. (still have the columbia.)
I own the columbia with a partner who I'm sure would sell it to me outright for cheap.
However, having sailed the columbia for the past few years, I find that I miss a smaller boat. After I retire, I plan to cruise the coast. I've long since decided the dream of sailing to some faraway island where I am greeted by natives bearing flowers, fruits and beautiful women is just not me. I expect that I will stay around florida and the caribbean. I can't imagine a passage longer than a few days.
I'm thinking about buying a pristine C&C 25 Mk II. Is that crazy? Will I be able to survive a three day passage on a small boat like that with a fin keel and outboard?
Before you ask, I will go to sailing school to learn how to sail larger water than the Tom Bigbee. I'll also crew with others if I can find an opportunity. I've done a considerable amount of daysailing the ocean, but have never taken an overnight at sea.

Most of my time will probably be spent around the Florida keys, with the occasional trip to the Bahamas, or to Cuba if they ever let me get in.

Tell me what you think, and thanks in advance for your responses.
__________________

__________________
RKO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 06:01   #2
Registered User
 
FamilyVan's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 1,779
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

Sounds like a great plan to me. Small boats make great sense. C&C 25's are quick well built boats. I'm assuming this plan includes you keeping a home ashore? If so, I can't think of any reason not to do this, especially given you know how to sail you've owned both large and small boats so you know the trade offs.

Sent from my XP7700 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________

__________________
FamilyVan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 06:32   #3
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,579
Images: 240
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

Maggie & I lived/cruised a C&C 29 for ten years.

Some other options ➥ Sailboats in Canada - 24' to 27' models

C&C Brochures ➥ C&C
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 07:45   #4
RKO
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Louisville KY, on the muddy Ohio
Boat: Columbia 8.7
Posts: 124
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

I'd really like a 27 or even a 29, but the pickings are few here in the mudholes of Louisville, and surrounding region. And that 25 is in excellent shape. I would live ashore IF I get the 25. If I found something like a 27 or 29, maybe I'd just live aboard for a few years.
__________________
RKO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 10:29   #5
Registered User
 
cwyckham's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Vancouver, BC
Boat: Niagara 35
Posts: 1,870
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

Sounds like a good plan to me. Only you know if you will enjoy yourself in the somewhat small interior, but people have done much larger trips in smaller boats.
__________________
Chris
SailMentor.com - Become the Confident Skipper of Your Own Sailboat
cwyckham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 10:37   #6
Senior Cruiser
 
skipmac's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: 29 49.16 N 82 25.82 W
Boat: Pearson 422
Posts: 12,374
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

How big a boat you need is completely subjective and based on each individual's needs and preferences. I have see a post on the forum from a couple that felt anything under 50' was way too small. On the other hand, I once met two couples from Germany that sailed a 27' boat from Europe and were living aboard in the Caribbean.

I lived on a 34' and a 36' and wouldn't really go smaller. For me anything below 30' would definitely be too small. One issue you will run into on boats smaller than 30' is storage space for food, tools, spares and such, water capacity and other things that are an issue if you're living on the boat and cruising. So you should evaluate your cruising plans and look into how long you might want or need to be self sufficient before going to a marina or town to restock.
__________________
The water is always bluer on the other side of the ocean.
skipmac is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 11:52   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Lake Havasu City, AZ, and PNW
Boat: Seaward 25, Beneteau 40
Posts: 161
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

Having spent the summer living aboard our 25 ft Seaward, I would say that your biggest issues are, as stated above, tankage and storage. We were in the protected waters of the San Juan and Canadian Gulf Islands so I cannot speak to how our boat would do in big ocean waves but I suspect she would handle more than we would be willing to put her through.
__________________
canyonbat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 12:43   #8
RKO
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Louisville KY, on the muddy Ohio
Boat: Columbia 8.7
Posts: 124
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

Yep storage and tankage will limit me, but I'm not sure I would want to go out for that long anyway. Still, I have 27-33 stuck in my head...
__________________
RKO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 13:11   #9
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,384
Images: 34
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

C &C 25 is a perfectly good boat but maybe a little on the small side for your plans. If you want to stick with Columbia I can recommend my model, the 29, if you happen to see one in your area. It has a little more room inside. Draws 4 feet, built tough, molded in long keel with attached rudder so if you hit anything it will bounce off. Yes it's a little tender but rocker-stoppers at anchor take care of that.
__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 13:12   #10
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2013
Location: Oregon to Alaska
Boat: Wheeler Shipyard 83' ex USCG
Posts: 1,700
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

I think boat size makes a difference for extended cruising. Especially when you get older. When younger I use to solo a 35' sloop and found it easier than a smaller boat, mainly because of the better ride and ease of getting around a more open deck. But I sailed North Pacific waters usually much rougher than you plan.
I'm 67 now, and debt free, but because of arthritis and other issues have a power boat. I have the skill and ability to do anything in repairs or maintenance, sometimes now with a helper, but don't need a yard except for haulout. Occasionally other people travel with me.
__________________
Lepke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 13:34   #11
RKO
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Louisville KY, on the muddy Ohio
Boat: Columbia 8.7
Posts: 124
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
C &C 25 is a perfectly good boat but maybe a little on the small side for your plans. If you want to stick with Columbia I can recommend my model, the 29, if you happen to see one in your area. It has a little more room inside. Draws 4 feet, built tough, molded in long keel with attached rudder so if you hit anything it will bounce off. Yes it's a little tender but rocker-stoppers at anchor take care of that.
There's actually a Columbia 28 nearby that seems to be in fair shape. I've always shied away from the Atomic four. Maybe I'm overthinnking that, though.
__________________
RKO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 13:52   #12
Registered User
 
jreiter190's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Melbourne, Fl., Patrick Airforce Marina
Boat: 1965 Pearson Alberg 35 #190
Posts: 322
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

Really depends on what height you are and how big or trim you are. And, cruising is really day sailing day after day . In the Islands of the Bahamas and Caribbean, you don't need three months provisions. I sailed for months on end with a 20 sack of rice six cans of coffee , 1/2 case of tomato paste, can of Crisco,20 gal. water and my diving and fishing gear. Live off your spear.Find a boat that fits your size and you will be content.
__________________
jreiter190 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 13:55   #13
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,384
Images: 34
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

Quote:
Originally Posted by RKO View Post
There's actually a Columbia 28 nearby that seems to be in fair shape. I've always shied away from the Atomic four. Maybe I'm overthinnking that, though.
I too shy away from those engines, though there's a million of them out there and they seem to run well for a long time if well-cared for. My own personal tastes for cruising are to have no keel bolts and no spade rudder, but that is me. That said, the Columbia 28 was well built and if maintained well may be a good choice for you. One other thing I like about the 29 compared to a flatter hull boat is that it is easy to keep the weight stored (like more food and water) below the water line with its narrow hull. You can always check with the Columbia Owners group on Yahoo Groups too for specific advice on the C28 from owners, it is pretty active. Also when I was much younger I lived on and sailed a Columbia 24, which to me at the time was heaven. The Columbia 26 MK1 is a nice choice also because it has the hanging locker and enclosed head and 6 foot headroom (or really close to it.) Those 24s and 26s were also built tough, long keel but cut-away forefoot so they steer well, attached rudders AND they had a well for the outboard which I found preferable to the inboard. If you cut a notch in the transom the engine can be tilted up (check how Baldwin does it too at atomvoyages.com.)
__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 14:18   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: fl- various marinas
Boat: morgan O/I 33' sloop
Posts: 1,097
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

You are right on. For 3-4 day cruises 25-30' is fine including Fl to Cuba (no problem getting in. problem was/is US gov.) 0r Bahamas (watch out for that very healthy cruiser fee). I would add an autopilot and a solar charging system to keep your batteries healthy. outboard power is fine if its a good one and very accessible but if you plan on sailing almost all of the time as I would, you need not carry a lot of extra gas. alcohol or propane stove, couple of ice chests and you should be fine for 2-4 days. hope this helps.
__________________
Dave22q is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2015, 20:25   #15
cruiser

Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lake Ontario
Boat: Douglas 32 Mk II
Posts: 1,923
Re: Soon to be cruiser question

We have owned a 20' (6 years) and 26' (6 years) trailerable (outboard powered) and now own (7 years) a Douglas 32 Mark II that we are outfitting for a year of cruising from Toronto to the Bahamas.

While the C&C 25 is a great boat, quick for size and a great sailer) I would choose something bigger for long term cruising. If you encounter conditions of high waves and light winds where motor sailing is necessary to get anywhere, that outboard is going to be a real problem.

Additionally, a good alternator to charge batteries is important. The little charger on most outboards really doesn't cut it if you use Autohelm a fair bit.

Standing head room is a real comfort for long term cruising.

In reality, it can be done on a C&C 25, but something bigger would be safer, more comfy, and most likely, more enjoyable.

Your $4000 / month pension will easily support a larger cruising vessel. In the C&C line, consider a Landfall.

Ramblin Rod
About Sheen Marine
__________________

__________________
ramblinrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cruise, cruiser

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What Makes a Cruiser, a Cruiser Randyonr3 General Sailing Forum 20 13-03-2010 19:43
Hello, from a Current Liveaboard and Soon-to-Be Cruiser MentalDungHeap Meets & Greets 3 31-01-2010 15:39
I need a ride: Baja/SoCal or San Fran to Hawaii, soon, very soon ferrarisgirl Crew Archives 0 13-05-2009 19:50
HELP for a soon to be brand new cruiser annegibsonwaco Meets & Greets 129 17-01-2008 18:49
Greetings from a soon to be full time cruiser Tangaroa Meets & Greets 7 13-12-2007 12:24



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 21:09.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.