Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 03-06-2009, 11:23   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 28
Solo - What Boat?

Ok, so this is the deal. I am going to buy a boat in the next year or two I have sailed for twenty years
or so but have little ocean experience and only three trips as the skipper on a boat 30 feet long and
one 38. I plan on doing blue water but not right away. The boat will be in Florida or the virgin isl.
I will start by sailing the Bahamas and Caribbean. I see my sailing as mostly me and my wife
but I also think It will be just me who may sometimes bring the boat from one cursing aria to the next.
An example of this may be, I sail the boat from Florida to the Virgin Isl. And my wife fly' s out and meets me.


I have One question and three boats in mind.


Can I handle this boat when the going gets rough and the sail gets stuck etc - what boat has to much
sail aria for one man?

3- Valiant 40/ Hylas 44 /Stevens-Hylas 47 “PS planning cutter rigged”.
__________________

__________________
CaptainTtwo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 11:28   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 2,313
Bigger boats are easier to sail but harder to dock, once you get over 24k displacement you cannot man handle them off the dock. I would not be worried about handling the sail on any of the boats you list, the largest sail is ~500 sq ft other then offwind sails.
__________________

__________________
Joli is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 11:33   #3
CF Adviser
Moderator Emeritus
 
Hud3's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Virginia
Boat: Island Packet 380, now sold
Posts: 8,929
Images: 49
I think a cutter rig is ideal for offshore and the Caribbean. I've been sailing my Island Packet 380 cutter single handed for years, first in the Cheasapeake and then in the Lesser Antilles, and have never had a problem. Well, only once in a marina, but that was just stupidity on my part, not the boat's.

The 38-40' range seems very manageable to me, but then I've never tried single handing a larger boat. For offshore passages, I've always had some friends eager to sign on as crew. My wife did an offshore once, and said that was enough for her. She prefers being a happy passenger, and let's me have my fun doing all the sailing.
__________________
Hud
Hud3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 11:54   #4
Registered User
 
hallie's Avatar

Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: oregon coast
Boat: Matsu, Columbia 34
Posts: 32
Send a message via Skype™ to hallie
Geordie single-hands ours just fine. He learned on full keel boats, and our Columbia is a fin keel ... maybe that made it seem easier. He might sell it to you too if you talk your trash right. The reason we got it and not any other boat he begged for was because the interior was in the civilized sort of shape a non-boater-wife-type (me) would consider long stretches of life upon.

I've offered to go with him down-wind wherever he wants to go. Anything requiring 30 degrees of heel for six weeks will be a solo trip, tho. ;D
__________________
Geordie's first mate (ha!) on Matsu, the mighty Columbia 34

when people lost sight of the way to live came codes of love and honesty
~Lao Tsu

life is dangerous and always ends in death.
hallie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 14:52   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: Bristol 38.8
Posts: 1,625
Well if money is no object, I'd look at that new Island Packet with the self-tending jib. You would also want a windvane, I think.
__________________
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 19:56   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,156
If you plan to do a lot of Bahamas sailing, you will want a boat with no more than 5 feet draft, which will eliminate a lot of larger boats. One boat that might be good is the Beneteau Idylle 11.5. It's a really nice 38 footer with 5 foot draft and a great layout below. They were built in 1984-85 and I think they all have Perkins 4-108 for power which is more than enough.

For blue water cruising you would need to add fuel tankage and either a watermaker or water tankage as well.
__________________
speedoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2009, 22:30   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 28
Smile

Thanks for the input it has all been helpful in one way or another.
On the other hand
At this point I am confident that I will stick to one of the three boats mentioned, and a price range of 100-200k. So the question is more about the size of the three boats.
__________________
CaptainTtwo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 01:57   #8
Senior Cruiser
 
Talbot's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Brighton, UK
Boat: Privilege 37
Posts: 3,579
Images: 32
At sea, the size of the boat with those you are lookig at is less a choice of the length, and more a question of what equipment has been fitted to make the job possible for a single handed passage - such as winch sizes, locations, reefing methods, autopilots, windvanes etc tec.

When it comes to a choice for a liveaboard, the question moves also to internal layout and facilities. What is more than acceptable for a weeks cruising, soon becomes a pain in the **** when living aboard.

a decent shower, hot pressurised water and lots of water tankage come high on the list, but I have also seen the need for fridge and freezer, some require their own washing machine, and even a dishwasher!

ability to keep the interior cool and ventilated, especially in the master bunk will make a big difference.

The larger a boat is at sea makes it better for comfort, also for liveaboard space, but makes handling in confined space a bit more of a problem. Your call!
__________________
"Be wary of strong drink. It can make you shoot at tax collectors - and miss."
Robert A Heinlein
Talbot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 06:51   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 28
Thank you, that is what I was looking for After all the difference In size from the smallest to the largest of the three is about ten thousand pounds and seven feet. I do plan on having an autopilot, and a wind vane and spare parts for both. Will also try to lead as many control lines to the cockpit as money will allow or at least make it as safe as possible. It seems like with this size boat “all three” roller furling jib and stay sail are probably needed, “OR at least the jib”:and maybe even the main??? I have seen what mother nature can do despite my- low- ocean and big boat experience. I have had a three thousand pound boat at about a 45% angle W/O sails; and almost broke a 27 foot boat when not paying attention
to the “wind opposite tide = very large steep waves”. So I guess if I was to try to solicit A bit more help from the forum it would sound like this. Lets say we are on the 47 “the largest” and having a bad day.
Lets say I'm not paying attention and a squall comes up with lots of sail up. Since this is a bad day I try to reduce sail and the Genoa gets jammed ; then being a bad day, so also the roller furling main , now
what---- and again would the 40 foot Valiant help me much? PS Lets leave down wind sails out of the picture for now.
__________________
CaptainTtwo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 08:38   #10
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 506
You could do a lot worse than a V 40 or V-42. They have done it all, several times.
It's not a small boat and has plenty of comfort for one guy. It's docile, dry, forgiving and loves a breeze. It also backs up under power like a dream. The biggest negative would be the lack of a transom boarding platform. But if you can't manage a boarding ladder you probably should rethink your plan. I always tend to think it's better to go smaller. 7' more feet of boat and the moorage fees could buy you a nice dinner in a lot of ports. Big boats are nice but when the flotsom hits the fan it's a lot more flotsom hitting a much bigger fan.

But I am very biased.
__________________
bob perry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 13:06   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Boston, MA
Boat: Bristol 38.8
Posts: 1,625
They also built some Valiant 40's with a shallower draft and centerboard, did they not? I expect that would be an option to consider for places like the Bahamas.
__________________
Curmudgeon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 13:17   #12
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 506
I think they built two cb valiants. There are a number of V's with reduced draft though.
The Bahamas may be nice but please keep in mind there is no substitute for draft if you want a boat to go to weather.
__________________
bob perry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 13:28   #13
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 4,413
Big boats cost more - exponentially when it comes to repair and maintenance. And then there's the docking and draft of larger yachts which makes them accessible to "less".

You probably want a nice aft cabin so it seems like a center cockpit... Some low 40s fit the bill. If you buy an older yacht you'll be spending lots on getting her in shape even if the purchase price is right.

For a couple, a HR 42 is plenty of boat or something similar.

Having just waxed and painted the hull of a 36er I'd be inclined to stay at the smaller end...

But then again... waterline gets you there in the end quicker... and there's lots to be said for that.
__________________
Sandero is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 13:31   #14
Senior Cruiser
 
Cheechako's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Skagit City, WA
Posts: 19,371
What is your age? To me 40 feet is manageable, you get up to 47 in a good blow and those primary's will give you a heart attack! They're all good boats, but I vote the V40/42
__________________
Cheechako is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2009, 13:48   #15
cruiser

Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 506
One thing you never hear on a boat,of any size:
"My winches are too big!"
__________________

__________________
bob perry is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
solo sail lynnwade Meets & Greets 15 13-11-2008 22:49
watch while solo martinworswick General Sailing Forum 8 11-11-2008 11:55
What's the most boat I can handle solo? Pepys Seamanship & Boat Handling 33 31-08-2008 11:29
Solo Circumnavigation of Cat Wildrice Multihull Sailboats 15 19-12-2007 21:34
First solo sail around Antarctica? TAREUA General Sailing Forum 4 28-11-2007 17:49



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 20:45.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.