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Old 09-03-2010, 10:52   #1
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Sixty-Foot Turkish Gulet

does anyone have any exp on one of these boats?
im looking for a liveaboard but it needs to b able to cross the atlantic, they look well built (heavily) im just wandering if they are mainly for med cruising.
the price on these are around 150,000 usd about 15yrs old and very nicely fitted out, single 210hp cat engine. they just seem a bit cheap compared to normal grp boats but imo look nicer and very spacious, so whats the catch?
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Old 09-03-2010, 12:18   #2
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most seem to be made out of Pine- atleast thats what the wood looks like, they have to be hauled out atleast 1x a year to fix /replace rotten planks, if its in good shape it could make the crossing at the right time of year-lots of upkeep- 3-4 years ago you could buy a new one for 175kUSD
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Old 09-03-2010, 12:26   #3
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quote from bill dietrich blog.
" 12/5/2009 (Saturday)At anchor at Simpson Bay Lagoon, St Martin.

My little toe looks bruised and feels a little sore, but I don't think it's broken.

Launched the dinghy around 8:30 and headed for the French side. As I approached the canal, saw a big wooden boat anchored there (pic). As I took the picture, the couple aboard waved me over, and asked for a ride to shore. Coming next to their boat, I saw it had big chunks and holes rotted out of the hull; really looked bad. As I ferried them in, they said the boat was Turkish, had been in fresh water, and the hull had been built out of non-treated wood, so now it was falling apart. But they said it was very nice inside. "

I hope this helps.
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Old 09-03-2010, 13:32   #4
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I've sailed a good bit in Turkish waters and been around these a lot.

These are living fossils; a relic of old-time shipbuilding which has pretty much disappeared everywhere else. Most of them are built in Bodrum, as far as I understand. So I find them endlessly fascinating. But I can't imagine crossing the Atlantic in one. It's not just that they are wooden (do you fully understand what that entails, by itself?). They are quite tubby, have crude, small rigs, and definitely not keen sailers. You never see them sailing; they are either motoring or motor-sailing or just motoring with a sail or two flapping to amuse the tourists on board.

What they are for, is not that. It is for lounging on the gorgeous after deck, under striped awning, tied up in the ancient harbor at Bodrum, sipping on a raki, showing off to the tourists strolling by, before your Turkish captain shoves off to putter down the Bay of Gokova to Cleopatra's Beach.
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Old 09-03-2010, 16:16   #5
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wooden boats at the best of time are very high maintenance,theres a saying about 10% sailing and 90% maintenance on wooden boats.

There are a lot of these boats in Turkey,you generally never see them elsehwhere as they have a reputation of being rot boxes,you probably have as much chance of crossing the Atlantic in a bath tub as you have in a Gullet.

last time that i was in the med,i spoke to a retired ships captain who had a brit built wooden boat,he was having a tough time with keeping that one water tight and i asked about a gullet he just laughed and laughed,then looked me straight and said"you are kidding arnt you"
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Old 15-03-2010, 06:56   #6
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i thought your meant to haul a boat out every year anyway, and surely planks wont need replacing every year if its painted correctly, surely thats the point of the paint is to protect the timber
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Old 15-03-2010, 07:18   #7
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Robdyson you have been given some good advice by the other posts. These boats are built with the knowledge that they will have a short lifespan. 15 years old it is likely paint is the only thing holding it together.
Sorry
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Old 15-03-2010, 09:57   #8
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We have a couple of them in Beirut. they are both very poorly built and aren't intended for actual sailing...they are basically a platform for swimsuit clad skin to deposit suntan lotion...
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Old 15-03-2010, 20:00   #9
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For $US150,000 you could buy a very nice cruising yacht and have a fair measure of choice.
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Old 15-03-2010, 21:00   #10
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Keeping the rot in the wood...

Cracks in an enamel type paint may allow fresh water into the wood (soft pine?) and keep it there, thus providing perfect conditions for rot.

If every piece of wood had been properly sealed with epoxy resin that might be a different story.
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Old 15-03-2010, 23:00   #11
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They sure are good looking though...
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Old 16-03-2010, 02:15   #12
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cherp

that is my problem. for $150,000 i cant buy a 60 ft yacht which is the only monohull i could live in, i like alot of space(with nice interior) even though its just me and girlfriend. im considering waiting another couple of yrs till i can afford a nice cat say minimum 44ft. ive seen an ex sweedish fishing boat in style of pilot house (wooden) but it seems timber hulls dont last or too high maintenance. Qs if hull is made of a decent hardwood would that b less maintenance.
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Old 16-03-2010, 02:27   #13
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I have seen steel ones around..
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Old 16-03-2010, 02:49   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robdyson View Post
Qs if hull is made of a decent hardwood would that b less maintenance.
A well built wooden boat can last indefinitely, in contrast to the short lifespan of the Gullet, but a 60 foot wooden boat needs a lot of maintenance, particularly if you purchase for a low price and want a boat to cross oceans.
You need to be able to afford to run the boat not just buy it. Even doing the work yourself the maintenance costs will be substantial.
The maintenance costs on a fiberglass cat will be less, but make sure you start the project with your eyes wide open. An older 44 cat is still expensive to keep.
Good luck and do not give up the dream it is a great lifestyle.
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Old 16-03-2010, 05:02   #15
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Do not know about Gulets but have had & rebuilt 3 wooden boats,Unless you are a boat carpenter & expert caulker better stay away.Good wood these is almost impossible to find & cost prohibitive.Pine especially untreated is close to the worst possible hull/framing wood.marc ps have seen pictures & they are pretty.
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