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Old 25-02-2014, 21:16   #16
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Tim
That's just the kind of feed back I am looking for. If I can get solid and seaworthy first year I should have another 5-10K second year on additional comforts or upgrades.
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Old 25-02-2014, 21:25   #17
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Good choice. Seriously, knowing you have a well-built, seaworthy boat under you when things go bad is priceless.
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Old 25-02-2014, 21:28   #18
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Right now I am looking at a 32 benne its a 90 model that has been converted from tiller to steering. Is that a reliable retrofit? This boat is at the tip top of my first year budget and is set up more as a day sailor.

The other is a mid 80s 36 Jenny, that needs cosmetic work and a new fuel cell. This boat was well equipped but has not been tended lately it appears and I am sure this boat holds some surprises. Much more equipment and previously used as a blue water cruiser.
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Old 25-02-2014, 22:00   #19
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Not sure about the Benneteau as I've never been on one. I know there are a lot of them but not sure how blue water capable they are as they were primarily designed for the charter industry. I know I know...blue water capable will start a fight. I also know that people have gone across the Atlantic in a row boat and a jet ski... But I don't consider them to be blue water capable. Just saying some of the names like Morgan, Island Packet, Pacific Seacraft, Pearson, etc have all built boats that are proven blue water boats.
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Old 25-02-2014, 22:25   #20
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Somewhat in same place as you
And after some discussion on the forum here
I have somewhat scaled down my list to few of the things you list
The order of importance for me is simple now
Hull
Engine
Standing Rigging
Sails
These are the big items that will stop you from
Leaving the dock
There was a lively discussion about the Engine on a sailboat
But when you need it, it must be there
Think about separating yourself from the rocks in a blow
And engine fixes on a boat of the size you want will kill your dream
I, myself am even considering going down to a 27 to get a better value
Not in the amount of cash of the initial purchase
But in the amount of work that will need to done to actually put to sea
Don't believe the baloney on yachtworld believe your eyes and read
Don Casey's book the illustrated sailboat.
I crapped out 35 HP diesel will double your boat bet
Wheel autopilot to replace 2 Grand. Tiller pilot to replace 600
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Old 26-02-2014, 05:51   #21
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodsmaster59 View Post
Not my first boat but certainly my first sail. The wife and I want to relocate to Florida and kill two birds per say. Live on it and gain experience until I have the skills to head towards PR DR Bahamas ect. Plan to stay from December to March yearly and spend hurricane season back safe and sound in tornado territory.

Like boats in the 32 to 38 range from a looks perspective only. Not to big not to small. Here is a list of things I think I want but need advice of more or less knowing where I want to go with this.

Mid 80.s to early 90's Boat
Right now the French boats have my eye.

Shallow draft under 5'
wheel steering
auto pilot
refrigeration
a/c
propane stove remote tank gimbled
hot water / pressure
radar

like to have
digital tv
solar or wind power charging system
anchor winch
advanced electronics gps plotter ect

What else? What to much?
Most important things to do after I find a boat I like at a price I can afford. Thanks
I was single-handing when we cruised, because my wife didn't want to have anything to do with handling the boat.

The autopilot you have on your list is a must-have for single-handing in my opinion. In addition, I had a rocker switch mounted on the steering pedestal to control the anchor windlass, a cutter rig with all three sails roller furling, and a radar/chartplotter display adjacent to the helm. I could handle everything from the cockpit. The cutter rig was ideal for tradewinds sailing. A nice-to-have is a remote for the autopilot so you can put the boat in gear at low revs and steer from the foredeck when bringing up the anchor. Not always necessary, but handy when needed.

Think about your dinghy, too. I had Kato davits on the stern and a davit for the outboard--made it very easy to handle by myself.
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Old 26-02-2014, 06:10   #22
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Wheel steering is a requirement? Some people like wheel steering, and it's fine if you do to. I am only asking because you say it's your first sailboat so not sure what the basis is for this.

Some people don't like wheel steering because wheels diminish helm sensitivity and are complicated machinery with lots of parts prone to breaking and require an "emergency tiller" to be used safely.

One of the reason people like wheels is because it makes them feel like they are driving a car and the wheel pedestal gives them a place to mount a bunch of computer screens and stuff just like a dashboard on their car. That's cool too I guess.
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Old 26-02-2014, 07:05   #23
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

So great input everyone. I really appreciate it. Here is what I am getting so far out of the posts. The hull, motor, rigging, and sails being sound is tops on the list. I can inspect the hull for damage, repairs, soft spots, ect. I am pretty comfortable with that except for below the waterline on a boat that is not on the hard. What bout the rest? Shaft cutlass ect. Do you look for leaks in that area? Can you visually inspect these from inside? Is there a general rule of thumb of how often these should be addressed? Motors I am good at. Sails I would think one would be able to visually determine the condition. Rigging being so important should someone as green as me pay someone to inspect these items?
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Old 26-02-2014, 08:23   #24
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

From what you have described I would think you would be best suited in a low 30's production boat. Catalina, Hunter, Benny, Jenny, Sabers, Pearson, etc. Some have pointed out that they are not blue water boats but you have not said you want to do blue water sailing (i.e. sailing to the Bahamas is not blue water, that's coastal cruising).

Your wife is going to be more comfortable on a wide beam, flat bottom boat. These will have better initial stability and will heal less if sailed right and will provide more comfort room at the dock or anchor. It will be less like camping.

I would worry less about the electronics because if there are new electronics the boat is out of your price range. The biggest concern is getting the boat in the best condition possible. Try not to stay married to any particular manufacturer and just look at the quality of the boat and how it has been maintained.
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Old 26-02-2014, 15:38   #25
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

You and Tim agree on that one and I hope I am smart enough to listen. My hopes are that if I am patient enough and work hard enough at looking / evaluating I can do both. That is find one I like and find one in solid condition. Thanks for the clarification. Where I am from anything over Mark Twain is blue water......LOL/
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Old 26-02-2014, 15:42   #26
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Here's one of the better how to look posts I've seen

Boat Inspection Trip Tips - SailboatOwners.com
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Old 26-02-2014, 21:29   #27
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Great post and great commentary after. With sliding scales of experience, intuition, aptitude, and knowledge of would be boat owners there is certainly no fool proof way to purchase a used boat or a used anything for that matter. Guidance provided to the would be buyer that pertains to intricacies of a sailboat purchase are invaluable. Not only are the dollars invested in a used boat important, but the future safety on a new sailor, the guests that may be aboard, or other boaters who come into contact with that vessel are at stake. For that reason I am grateful to the forum and the contributing members for helping me. I am getting a good feel for the process now and I am formulating an attack on the used sale boat market now. One members offer mentioned in the previous message link would be a HUGE help to me and others like me. If a member with some considerable experience accompanied me to look at a boat to see if looked to be worthy of a survey would be AWESOME. I live in Missouri and plan a 1800 mile trip to south florida soon to look at prospects and see if there are any I want to take to the next step. I will look for assistance from members when I do and maybe I will get lucky and have someone local to come along and share the fun. Thanks again everyone. Keep the ideas coming. Some good reads for new sailboat owners? I need some reading material while I digest the 11 degree high temperature here this week in st Louis.
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Old 26-02-2014, 21:51   #28
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Another thing I learned when buying boats, I researched and read everything I could find. While looking online I found a few boats that were just what I was looking for, and I just knew it was the boat for me. One of those boats was in Virginia. Once I actually went to look at it, I remember stepping onboard and going below and it just didn't feel right, something just didn't fit. I have only purchased 2 sailboats so I don't have as much experience as others. When I went to look at the boat I'm currently living on, I sat down in the cockpit and looked around and after 2 minutes I said to myself..."Yep, this is my boat." To me, the boat has to feel right. Not sure if that makes sense or not.
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Old 26-02-2014, 21:56   #29
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Agree with CaptainTim, we put together our list of must haves, should haves and like to have but ultimately bought a boat that in theory wasn't on the list, in part because it felt right.
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Old 26-02-2014, 22:12   #30
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Re: Single Handed Live aboard for two?

Here's something you could do, which is mostly what I did when trying to narrow down the seemingly infinite number of choices out there. Make a spreadsheet with columns for the type of boat, length, width, it's URL to YachtWorld or where ever, it's asking price, and anything else that's basic info for each boat in which you're interested. Then add more columns with information from your visit to the boat or from what you can glean from the listing or talking to the broker such as: main sail (insert year/condition), jib (year and condition), other sail inventory, condition of hull (might have to ask since you won't do a haul out until you're ready to purchase), running and standing rigging (condition and/or year replaced), engine (size, condition, maintenance record), and on and on and on, depending on what you consider the most important. This is helpful because as soon as you go to look at a few boats, you're going to forget what one had and the other didn't. And some of these boats you'll cross off the list before you even go to look at them. You'll probably get a feel for what you want after traipsing around on a few of them, but the matrix you created by the spreadsheet can be a real sanity check. If you wanted to get really super analytic, you could assign numbers for each category. But don't go off the deep end with something like this. It's really just a useful memory device. In my spreadsheet, I also included notes when I read something about a boat such as "CW's Best Cruising Sailboat." The best reads are to just Google every builder you come across that you think you might like. Doing this kind of research can paralyze some people from making a decision, but I found the knowledge to be empowering when you go talk to brokers. I could have done better at the negotiating stage, but I know I have a boat that was absolutely what I wanted even though I had never sailed one like it until I went on the sea trial for the purchase. Talk about anxiety!! Good luck :-)
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