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Old 20-08-2015, 00:46   #31
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Re: Proper practices for the interior of sailboats (Insulating)

Please be aware you cannot fix rotten wood by "glassing over it." Rotten wood must be removed and new, wood epoxied in, scarfed in, for strength. The wood generally is rotten where sea water has come in. The wood gets stained from the leaks, but it is the lack of proper sealant that is at fault.

I betcha the links you've already received will serve you well. If you want to restore your home, don't take shortcuts that'll cost time and money to fix.

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Old 20-08-2015, 06:22   #32
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Re: Proper practices for the interior of sailboats (Insulating)

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Originally Posted by msh_sailers View Post
Since I am new to the boating community, I am trying to create a mental picture of "giving air space" between the layers with stringers. But I am not exactly following. Any chance you know of a image on google that can show me this? Thank you so much for your insight. I have already bought the Reflectix but not the foam. Any info would be great. I need to move the boat in two weeks and Id hope to get most if not all of this done by then. Thank you once again!
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Old 20-08-2015, 10:04   #33
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Re: Proper practices for the interior of sailboats (Insulating)

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It is intended to be used inside of air gap walls. The air is the insulator and is trapped and therefore cannot move. Air is a somewhat decent insulator.......
Bobcat, thanks for the explanation. I have a better understanding now. Seeing as I have already bought it and is literally taking up 1/3 of the space in my cabin, I think I will use it, however, not in all the places on my boat, just to use it up basically. In order to get at least some use out of it, I was thinking of giving it a 3/4 air gap between the layers. besides, It can only be good for water resistance since clearly it is impermeable to water. Cheers mate!

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..... In the insulating claims that Reflectix make on their packaging, they indicate not what the insulating value of their product might be, but only show the total R value for whatever assembly they are quoting. There is very little insulating value to Reflectix and that is a fact! Yes, there is an insulating value for an air gap (if still air), but you can hardly claim credit for that because of your shiny product. A simple 6 mil plastic sheet will perform as well, and frankly, until the air gap exceeds about 3/4", it doesn't add an appreciable amount of insulating value....
Redsky, I extremely appreciate your honesty. At least now I know literally what I am working with. I figurered at this point, I will just use it, but I will not buy another roll (or 4 since that was how much I would have needed). Instead I will take your advice on getting Armaflex next. I will use that in the V-birth and most insulation on the hull port and starboard. If possible, I would like to use this still on the cabin top while using your suggested 3/4in air gap (and some). I figured that it would be nice to get access to the cabin top in one fail swoop. So I have devized this in order to use it.



I figured that since I will want to use durable waterproof paneling, I would adhere the first layer of Reflexit to the panel, construct a plastic or wood spacers, and seal it between another layer of Reflexit. I figured that your math on 3/4 inch would be a good target. So that it gets the air gap that you suggested it needs. All while still leaving some gap between the hull and the last layer of Reflexit. I would then mount and screw the panels to wood furring strips that I would epoxy to the cabins ceiling prior. Any thoughts anyone on this idea? The panels themselves would be what the layers and gaps are attached to. I wouldn't, in this scenario, be adhering the ceiling directly. Is this a bad idea? Or something that has a chance of actually working?

Thank you all once again!
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Old 20-08-2015, 10:11   #34
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Re: Proper practices for the interior of sailboats (Insulating)

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Originally Posted by Ann T. Cate View Post
Please be aware you cannot fix rotten wood by "glassing over it." Rotten wood must be removed and new, wood epoxied in, scarfed in, for strength. The wood generally is rotten where sea water has come in. The wood gets stained from the leaks, but it is the lack of proper sealant that is at fault.

I betcha the links you've already received will serve you well. If you want to restore your home, don't take shortcuts that'll cost time and money to fix.
Ann
Understood. Thank you. I was under the assumption that the rot epoxy that I had gotten would work at least till I remove the mast next Spring. I figured since I wouldn't be doing any sailing (other than on the bay), I would be alright. Captain Goodwind, whom I hired to bring the boat from Oriental, NC to Annapolis, MD mentioned that the ship handled well with the main sail but that is not to say that it is golden. So for now, I will leave it be and put no epoxy. Next Spring though, I will do exactly as you suggested. Cut it out, replace with new wood and look into "scarfing" it (not familiar with that process). Thank you for your suggestion!

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TRULY HELPFUL! Thank you.
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Old 20-08-2015, 10:20   #35
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Re: Proper practices for the interior of sailboats (Insulating)

I was amused with the comment that their boat lit up like a Christmas tree on radar. All of that foil makes a great radar reflector!

By the way, the foil itself does in fact perform a purpose, which is reflecting IR back towards the source.

Which means that if you want to use it in a hot environment to reduce heat absorbed, place a layer with the foil adjacent to the hull, with no insulation between it and the exterior of the boat.

If you are in a cold environment, then you want to place the layer on the inside of the wall, with no insulation between it and the interior.

If in both (hot summer, cold winter) then a layer on each side with insulation between.

The foil will perform its purpose of reflecting (IR) heat in the appropriate direction.

The bubble wrap is almost but not quite useless as an insulator and really just acts as a carrier of the foil.
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Old 20-08-2015, 16:36   #36
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Re: Proper practices for the interior of sailboats (Insulating)

+2 on the Armacell insulation.
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Old 20-08-2015, 18:55   #37
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Re: Proper practices for the interior of sailboats (Insulating)

Sounds like a lot of effort. Are you planning to liveaboard in cold weather?

You will lose most heat through glass hatches and ports.

We made hatch pads. Basically a foam pad that fits on the underside of the hatch. We also made elasticised covers for the ports in winter. Nice and cosy in winter.

Our hull is insulated as well. We use a small oil heater in winter.

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