Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 07-02-2010, 09:43   #1
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Newport, Oregon
Boat: Columbia
Posts: 21
Pilothouses

Are pilothouses required equipment for heading north? Say BC and south west Alaska. Or are they more personal preference? May limit they boat search. Thanks Jeremy
__________________

__________________
buhrly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 09:48   #2
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Anacortes, WA
Boat: Maine Cat 41
Posts: 325
Nope. Not required. Plenty of folks head north in small open boats, large cruising boats, no pilothouse. But those who can enjoy themselves when it's raining for a number of days in a row, or when the cold wind blows briskly across the Straits, or when they end up in a pretty cove that has a surplus of hungry skeeters, well, they seem to be the ones who have pilothouses or significant cockpit protection.

If you can enjoy those challenges without such things then I'd say again... Nope, not required.
__________________

__________________
cchesley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 10:15   #3
Registered User
 
James S's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: Yemen & Lebanon... the sailboat is in Lebenon, the dhow is in Yemen
Boat: 1978 CT48 & 65ft Cargo Dhow
Posts: 5,816
Images: 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by cchesley View Post
Nope. Not required. Plenty of folks head north in small open boats, large cruising boats, no pilothouse. But those who can enjoy themselves when it's raining for a number of days in a row, or when the cold wind blows briskly across the Straits, or when they end up in a pretty cove that has a surplus of hungry skeeters, well, they seem to be the ones who have pilothouses or significant cockpit protection.

If you can enjoy those challenges without such things then I'd say again... Nope, not required.
I'd agree 100%
For me...if I was going to be doing a lot of cruising in those areas I'd prefer a boat with a pilot house....but then I've gotten fairly soft over the years.
__________________
James
S/V Arctic Lady
I love my boat, I can't afford not to!
James S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 11:07   #4
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: seattle
Boat: Devlin 48 Moon River,j/100 BJ
Posts: 586
If you do a pilot house boat heat with wipers and a way to defog windshild helpful in northwest. As far as comfort goes a motor sailor or efficient motor boat with some kind of stabalization works well in northwest.
__________________
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 11:22   #5
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Newport, Oregon
Boat: Columbia
Posts: 21
Like the comfort(and no skeeters) but still want a true sailboat. And not to suffer too much if we went south. Seems like alot of the pilothouses are listed as motorsailers.
__________________
buhrly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 13:39   #6
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Newport, Oregon
Boat: Columbia
Posts: 21
Is there a down side to the pilothouse boats? How come everyone doesn't have one?
__________________
buhrly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 13:47   #7
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Out cruising
Boat: Bruckmann 50
Posts: 521
Quote:
Originally Posted by buhrly View Post
Is there a down side to the pilothouse boats? How come everyone doesn't have one?
They can be hotter if you don't shade and ventilate them well. They take up the space of a rear berth in smaller sized boats. Some are designed so as to require the boom to be raised and therefore smaller main area. I can't think of a lot of other down sides.

I couldn't believe how much better I felt after a long passage with the indoor steering/watch station though, so I could go on and on about the good things.

Jim
__________________
jkleins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 13:58   #8
Registered User
 
Livia's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2008
Boat: Currently boatless
Posts: 637
If we were staying in the PNW, we would have gone with a pilot house. Because we knew after a few years we were going tropical, we put on a bimini with panels for a full enclosure. It's sooooo nice in the winter at anchor (we hang out *outside*, just imagine!) and when motoring.

Our mainsheet comes into the cockpit behind the dodger so we do not have the panels up when sailing (bimini only, or if sailing off the wind we might have the rear panes up which break the wind).

It looks like this: SV Estrellita 5.10b: Full Enclosure

And at the photo at the top of the blog you can see it while we are sailing.

Iverson (Tacoma/Seattle) did the work.
Livia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 14:22   #9
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Anacortes, WA
Boat: Maine Cat 41
Posts: 325
Mostly, those who have pilothouses will stay with them. Well, that might not be entirely true, but for sure they will have times when they wish they had.

Sadly, few sailing vessels are designed with sailing protection given as an initial design requirement. It would be nice to see more with an integrated design rather than having to do the aftermarket add on. But, most make do. Traditions in the sailing world take many years to evolve.

Here's our integrated version of a pilothouse. I will not go without and this isn't a motorsailer, well, it can be, but it isn't.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Another day at the office.JPG
Views:	441
Size:	70.2 KB
ID:	13060  
__________________
cchesley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 17:42   #10
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Boat: a sailing boat
Posts: 17,314
Maybe they are not required, but very nice to have one.

I sailed tropical Pacific in 2004 and hated not having one.

b.
__________________
barnakiel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 17:42   #11
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 945
I am hoping to find a nice pilothouse or long range motorsailer. One of our biggest requirements is to have an open area with plenty of natural light and visibility. The only option was to look at CATS and we did but, we love the look and feel of older mono's.. We love being out there on the water and sailing but why if we could avoid being wind and weather beaten, then I'm all for it!!

Unfortunately, most of the decent sized pilothouses are a little pricey but, the search continues!! But, they are our first choice!!
__________________
shadow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 17:47   #12
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: seattle
Boat: Devlin 48 Moon River,j/100 BJ
Posts: 586
The thing about the NW is that much of the summer has large areas with little wind and you end up powering the rest of the year is damp and often damp with light wind and when the wind does come up it may be nasty in an open cockpit. I have lived on east coast and sailed in VI and would not do pilot house if I was young again but NW is another story. Six to eight hours out in a wet cockpit is no fun. The other big advantage of a pilot house is that you can do continuous navigation in a nice dry warm invironment and with all the rocks and fog thats a big plus.
__________________
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 17:52   #13
Registered User
 
scook1's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Bourbonnais, Illinois
Boat: McGregor venture 15 "IMP"
Posts: 506
I would certainly recommend a pilot house for that area of the country. Also, some pilot house sailboats have other design features that would favor that climate.
Spencer
__________________
Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air…
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
scook1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 18:08   #14
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: seattle
Boat: Devlin 48 Moon River,j/100 BJ
Posts: 586
Fisher made a line of motor sailors from 25-45 ft they come up used the 37 is a good NW boat-A more sail boat oriented type boat would be a Bob Perry valiant 40 with pilot house. There where several other local NW designed pilot H boats that pop up in local sailing mags. NW sailing and 48 degrees.





bob
__________________
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2010, 18:29   #15
Moderator Emeritus
 
hummingway's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Gabriola Island & Victoria, British Columbia
Boat: Cooper 416 Honeysuckle
Posts: 6,933
Images: 5
I love my Cooper 416. Built in Vancouver designed Stan Huntingford. The Cooper 353 is another nice pilothouse but I haven't sailed on that one. The 416 is very spacious and bright and sails well. Mine has a full bimini as well so I am completely spoiled!
__________________

__________________
hummingway is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:39.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.