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Old 29-07-2012, 17:21   #1
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Pearson Yachts

Looking for a solid, safe Coastal Cruiser for my wife and I, that I'll purchase in the next 2 years. Right now looking at Pearson's and doing research. Budget is under $60K. Can anyone tell me if there are any major "structural" differences in THE 83-87 Pearson 34, 36, and 37? (Sloop/Cutter, NO Ketch.) Any one of these three series have safety/structural benefits over the other that would make one a safer coastal cruiser then the other?
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Old 29-07-2012, 17:40   #2
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Re: Pearson Yachts

Spent many sea miles in a Pearson 365. A very solid, stable, seaworthy sea boat. You can sail one of those anywhere. If safety is what you want then you won't do much better than that.

BUT -- there are a few negatives. Very poor saiing performance with the shortish rig and longish keel. Very limited interior volume -- no accomodation aft of the companionway, no quarterberth, nothing (but the flip side of that is excellent deck storage). Inaccesible engine with horrible v-drive -- good thing they were mostly built with the bulletproof Westerbeke 4-104.
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Old 29-07-2012, 17:51   #3
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Re: Pearson Yachts

My friends sailed a Pearson 365. I believe some are sloops (theirs was a ketch). He (the skipper) said their boat sailed well and had comfortable motion. She was still with him. So I believe a sound 365 is a good boat.

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Old 29-07-2012, 18:15   #4
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Re: Pearson Yachts

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
My friends sailed a Pearson 365. I believe some are sloops (theirs was a ketch). He (the skipper) said their boat sailed well and had comfortable motion. She was still with him. So I believe a sound 365 is a good boat.

b.
They have excellent motion. But don't go upwind at all.

The only safety negative I can think of is that there is no crash bulkhead to the chain locker -- chain is stored right in the main hull volume (and can be stinky in the v-berth). But I think that that is typical in that size boat.
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Old 29-07-2012, 20:11   #5
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Re: Pearson Yachts

I've heard, and read up on the 365, but I am not really interested in a Ketch. I've read many "seaworthy" reports on the 365, but I don't see much of the same on the mid 80's (83-88) 34, 36 (non 365) and 37. Are they the same quality as the 365?
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Old 30-07-2012, 14:00   #6
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Re: Pearson Yachts

I believe all of those designs were done by Bill Shaw who did pretty nice work. I own a 1982 Pearson 323 and have been very happy with the construction on it. Seacocks are all bronze, pretty heavy hull, nice wiring, solid rig, large v-berth and pretty good access for everything except the engine. Bill liked the v-drive for whatever reason. It's a PITA to work on.

The 365 comes in a cutter configuration, not just a ketch, so you may want to give that a look. You could easily pick up a nice one in the 30-40 range and have money left over for refits.

None of his boats are what you'd consider blue water, though I know of a couple 365's that've made the trip across the pacific and Matt Rutherford took a 323 across the Atlantic. But Bill really didn't design them for that. They're a fantastic coastal cruiser though.
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Old 30-07-2012, 14:23   #7
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Re: Pearson Yachts

Quote:
(...) don't go upwind at all. (...)
E.g. compared to a Swan, they do not match. Compared to a Westasail they do well, etc. ...

All relative and too dependent on diver's skill.

If upwind qualities are a concern, I think one will prefer a sloop version of same boat.

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Old 30-07-2012, 18:36   #8
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Re: Pearson Yachts

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E.g. compared to a Swan, they do not match. Compared to a Westasail they do well, etc. ...

All relative and too dependent on diver's skill.

If upwind qualities are a concern, I think one will prefer a sloop version of same boat.

Hugs,
b.
With bottom configurations being equal between the 365 Ketch and the 365 Sloop, why would the sloop have better upwind performance? Seems the Ketch would have more combined sail area???
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Old 30-07-2012, 18:47   #9
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Re: Pearson Yachts

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With bottom configurations being equal between the 365 Ketch and the 365 Sloop, why would the sloop have better upwind performance? Seems the Ketch would have more combined sail area???
Search the archives for long, technical explanations of ketch v. sloop upwind abiity. It's not a function of sail area. Ours was a sloop, but still very poor upwind. The boat was extremely heavy for her size -- 10 tons I think -- with a shortish mast and modest sail area, and just would not make miles upwind no matter what you did.

The flip side was massive seaworthiness for her size and a lovely motion. You could sail that boat anywhere, in any sea conditions.
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Old 30-07-2012, 18:57   #10
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Re: Pearson Yachts

The older 365, 420's etc have the same good rep. Yeah they wont outsail a racing hull, but likely outsail a Hans Christian very well! My friends had a newer.... 37?... might be more the design you are talking about. Decent boat, but a little more of a racer/cruiser style with spade rudder....... they had a few breakage issues... With 60 k in this economy you can get a pretty good boat, you have to limit yourself to the Pearson... Think about what type you want, heavy , slow but very solid, or lighter and faster....
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Old 30-07-2012, 19:14   #11
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Re: Pearson Yachts

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
If upwind qualities are a concern, I think one will prefer a sloop version of same boat.

Hugs,
b.
This is what I was referring too.... why would the sloop have better upwind than the cutter on same hull???
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Old 30-07-2012, 19:29   #12
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Re: Pearson Yachts

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With bottom configurations being equal between the 365 Ketch and the 365 Sloop, why would the sloop have better upwind performance? Seems the Ketch would have more combined sail area???
1) It (the sloop) will likely point higher. The sloop then can sail the considerably shorter way and so achieve better VMG. If the destination is upwind (and you must tack to reach it), the sloop wins.

2) It will likely sail faster, at least when beating and tight reaching. Call it physics, department of aerodynamics. Culprits mostly drag and forward/heeling vectors relationships.

3) I did not know Pearson 365 ketch has more SA than the sloop. If it does and if the difference is big enough they may match as the boat with more sail may sail faster and so make up for the lost distance. It may actually get an advantage.

Anyways, looking at this sort of boats (you want to go cruising or racing?) fine nuances of upwind performance are the last thing I (biased) would care about. Think diesel engines.

If you think upwind performance counts to you, get a J-boat. They perform. My friends sailed far and away in a J-35, fast.

Cheers,
b.
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Old 30-07-2012, 19:48   #13
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We have a 385 center cockpit and love it. Solid and sails well. I know there are a few out there for sale. Check the owners site and google. If you have any specific questions just ask.
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Old 30-07-2012, 20:53   #14
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Re: Pearson Yachts

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
1) It (the sloop) will likely point higher. The sloop then can sail the considerably shorter way and so achieve better VMG. If the destination is upwind (and you must tack to reach it), the sloop wins.

2) It will likely sail faster, at least when beating and tight reaching. Call it physics, department of aerodynamics. Culprits mostly drag and forward/heeling vectors relationships.

3) I did not know Pearson 365 ketch has more SA than the sloop. If it does and if the difference is big enough they may match as the boat with more sail may sail faster and so make up for the lost distance. It may actually get an advantage.

Anyways, looking at this sort of boats (you want to go cruising or racing?) fine nuances of upwind performance are the last thing I (biased) would care about. Think diesel engines.

If you think upwind performance counts to you, get a J-boat. They perform. My friends sailed far and away in a J-35, fast.

Cheers,
b.
I am sorry, I stated cutter when I should of stated Ketch. So, earlier you stated regarding the P365, If I wanted better upwind performance I should get the P365 Sloop instead of the P365 Ketch. My question is why does the Sloop point better than the Ketch on the same hull (P365).

Understand the benefits of pointing higher, covering greater distances etc etc, which would be of benefit cruising. I have no intention of racing. I do prefer the 365 Sloop over the Ketch, I was just curious as to why you said the Sloop would point better than the Ketch on same hull.

I actually like the underside of the 365, the protection of the rudder, as well as the enclosed ballast in the keel. Not against Fin Keel boats at all, but if I can find a "semi full keel" that I like, I'll consider over the Fin. Also looking at a Cal 33, and several Tartans, but I wanted to keep this thread dedicated to Pearson.Very mechanical, but concerned about the "V" Drive.

Got a lot of time to look and research, plan on hitting a lot of boatyards here in SC and down in FL when I visit my daughters.

I'd like to narrow down to one or two makes and models, then begin the search for a particular boat.
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Old 30-07-2012, 21:40   #15
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Re: Pearson Yachts

I believe the factory 365 sloop (not a ketch with the mizzen removed) has a taller main mast.

The 365 ketch and sloop share the same shoal draft underbody. The cutter has a more performance bottom and is about a foot deeper. It also has a traveler. It is often referred to as a 367.

Some of the later model cutters 81-83 have the optional quarter berth.
Starting in 1980 there was an optional teak interior for the 365. I believe all the cutters had the teak interior. Also starting in 1980 there was an optional rub rail.
The 365 series ran 1976-1983. The 367 were, I think, 1981-1983.
There was a different 36 model prior to 1976 and still another after 1984, this one with a centerboard.
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