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Old 13-06-2009, 22:46   #1
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Oyster Lightwave 48 - Thoughts?

After 2 years of looking we are checking out the Oyster Lightwave 48. We are looking at some racing but also sailing to the Canada and back to Honolulu every year or so.

I appreciate any inputs.

We have also considered a Baltic 50, Swan43, Cheoy Lee 48, Tartan 4600, Dyanamique 62 and Amel 53.
Day late, a few bucks short or difficult brokers.
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Old 13-06-2009, 23:36   #2
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I'd go for the Swan 43 if you are talking the early '70s version. I've been in love with that boat since my youth. supposedly a sweet handling boat with a good turn of speed and enough displacement to be comfortable. Getting a bit long in the tooth though maintenance is everything.

Oysters have a great reputation but think it may be a little overblown from a couple of reports I've heard. Good boats just not the be all and end all that some claim they are. If it's the one in Honolulu, would be cautious of the teak decks. You are talking 20-50 or more boat units to replace if they are shabby. Also don't like the in mast furling. If it ever misbehaves you are stuck with a sail that you'll have to live with. Only way to get it down is with a knife. Many claim they are the cat's meow but I've heard of too many problems and a bad situation if there is a problem. Other than that, it's a beautiful boat.

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Old 14-06-2009, 00:15   #3
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Hi Peter, great points. Yes its the one in Honolulu. You are sharp. How did you know? It was listed only a few days ago.
The teak was changed recently and is in very good shape.
I completely agree with you. I reeeeeeeally dont like the inmast furling. Weight aloft just doesn't make sense especially with the carbon masts and boom furling available especially with a light boat. It will be the one upgrad I am really considering.

A 66 PHRF rating isnt typical for Oyster. I am wondering what they sacrificed to make ti so fast. Carl Schumacher was a genious, but something had to give
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Old 15-06-2009, 06:19   #4
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Your variety of boats is quite wide. I agree with roverhi, in mast is not something I want to deal with and the jury seems to be out for in boom furling. The problem with in boom furling is you end up with a pretty big pile of mylar/kevlar on deck if the furler goes tits up. Kind of like having a foil on the front end. Great for racing with a big crew, not so great with a short heanded cruiser.

And 66 for a 48 footer is not that fast.
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Old 16-06-2009, 01:01   #5
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Hi Jolli
As I mentioned, we have been looking mainly at performance cruisers and with the exception of the Cheoy lee, I think they are. Trying to find something on the west coast, in our price range has been a challenge. Perhaps its (Cheoy Lee) slower rating was why I dragged my feet until someone beat me to it.

I am glad you agree with us about the inmast furling. I dont know why it is standard on so many new boats. There was a lot of trouble with the boom furling systems but most I have talked to said they have most of it solved with solid vangs and such. I think it is mature enough technology that I'd be ready to give it a try. Rather a pile in teh cockpit than having to slice it off the mast inheavy weather. Wow

I think 66 is fairly fast for a performance cruiser, I guess I wasnt clear. I was saying it was FASTER than other Oysters. I was attempting to indicate that Oysters are traditionally heavier cruisers, not known for building racer/cruisers and I was wondering how much of the Oyster heritage remained. The oyster 485 weighs in a 41,000 lbs and the Lightwave is down to 27,000. That seems like a lot.

I could easily find something faster. Those Volvo 70's are kind of tight. I dont mind so much after living in submarines for 20 years. Im not certain if you are married but I dont want to ask my wife to live on a racer/ULDB.

This is pretty much the reason I posted the question asking if anyone was familiar with them. That's what the thread was about. I haven't seen a regular Oyster much less the Lightwave. Have you seen any? Any opinions?
Thanks for the thoughts, Nick
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Old 16-06-2009, 04:44   #6
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Hello Nick,

What I meant about speed was that a J35 rates 69~72, depending on locale. So 66 for a 48 footer is ok.

I like Carl Schumachers designs and I like Oyster as a company in general. It looks like the boat was built to "west coast" philosophies. There is no timber under the ply and some of ply shows water has wicked up the sides. These are some of the tricks they use to reduce weight. Nothing wrong with it but more maintenance is required to keep the boat light and dry.

Oh, and fast is not always a good thing. Our currrent boat rates ~ -13 so it pulls the apparent (ie you're always sailing tight angles.)

Anyway, for $200k it surely merits a look.

Have fun,

Joli
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Old 16-06-2009, 05:08   #7
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Oyster is a nice choice for a performance cruiser (in the owners version) but tends to have a lot of the toys missing for liveaboard and long distance sailing - i.e. fridge/freezer, sufficient water, sufficient fuel etc.
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Old 19-06-2009, 19:11   #8
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Some great information here, thanks all
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Old 21-08-2009, 09:37   #9
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Oyster 48 Lightwave

I own an Oyster 48 Lw, have circumnavigated with only my whife as crew, during a 9 year trip.
This is my cruising 10 boat, I am very positive to the Lw, a good performer, very strongly built, comfortable cockpit, excellent liveaboard (has a good galley, fridge, freezer, showers and plenty of storage).
Tankage has been sufficient as IT IS A SAILINGBOAT and we have a Watermaker and solar panels.
Regarding in-mast furling;
- It adds weight to the top but with the 4 tons of lead, she is still stiff
- It takes a bit of caution when unfurling, always upwind or on a starboard tack and always pull it out with the outhaul with some brake on the furler. We have never had any difficulty with it.
+ It is a great gear whe sailing shorthanded
+ You hoist the heavy sail once, not every time you go sailing
+- a fully battened sail shapes better, but is heavy to set. (there might be furling mains with full battens to find somewhere?)
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Old 10-12-2009, 10:31   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FerJoe View Post
I own an Oyster 48 Lw, have circumnavigated with only my whife as crew, during a 9 year trip.
This is my cruising 10 boat, I am very positive to the Lw, a good performer, very strongly built, comfortable cockpit, excellent liveaboard (has a good galley, fridge, freezer, showers and plenty of storage).
Tankage has been sufficient as IT IS A SAILINGBOAT and we have a Watermaker and solar panels.
Regarding in-mast furling;
- It adds weight to the top but with the 4 tons of lead, she is still stiff
- It takes a bit of caution when unfurling, always upwind or on a starboard tack and always pull it out with the outhaul with some brake on the furler. We have never had any difficulty with it.
+ It is a great gear whe sailing shorthanded
+ You hoist the heavy sail once, not every time you go sailing
+- a fully battened sail shapes better, but is heavy to set. (there might be furling mains with full battens to find somewhere?)
hello ...we are seriously considering buying an Oyster 48 Lightwave lying in France ..called 'Pacific Pearl'. Do you know it? In very good condition with a new motor and new teak decks, but has in mast furling! Sounds like you are very happy with yours!
regards judy
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Old 11-12-2009, 11:10   #11
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Did you look at the Orion 50..........I had almost the same list as you for years and just bought one of the two available
Just spent 2 weeks on her and in her bilges etc; great boat!
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Old 11-12-2009, 14:08   #12
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hey there NTD did you buy the boat already if not she is sold. just went to sight says vessel sold
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Old 11-12-2009, 14:14   #13
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This is a much better boat.....





50' Ta Shing Orion

  • Year: 1983
  • Current Price: Can$ 239,900
  • Located In RI, United States
  • Hull Material: Fiberglass
  • Engine/Fuel Type: Single Diesel
  • YW# 1549-2108457
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Old 12-02-2010, 05:52   #14
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We bought an Oyster Lightwave and sailed her to Singapore

Bought the boat in SF and sailed her to Singapore in 58 sea days, including an 18 day single handed passage. No problem
The short story?
Love to make passages in this boat. Sails easily to hull speed. Fast, flat, and well balanced. Just a pleasure to sail in.
Simple, light cruising boat, good if you like to go with solar panels and wind gen, not so good if you want to add a lot of heavy generators, aircon etc.
Go for a boat without the inmast furling- the original Sterns mast is bullet proof.
Want to know more?
Cresswell
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Old 24-02-2010, 13:21   #15
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Check out the Cambria's on the market. We bought ours last year, great boat, and the prices are dropping...
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