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Old 17-03-2004, 14:30   #1
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Origami Metal Boat Construction

Since 1980 I've been designing and building steel boats using the Origami method of construction. This method greatly reduces the amount of time and expense involved in building a metal boat. It consists of determining the plate shapes, cutting them out of full sized plates ( 8ft x 36 ft plates in the case of a 36 footer), welding longitudinal stringers on , then pulling the edges together with comealongs , tacking as you go . The decks and cabin are done the same way. This has enabled me to put together a 36 ft hull in as little as two days, and tack together the entire shell ( hull, decks ,cabin, keel, rudder , skeg, cockpit, and wheelhouse ) in less than a week, working with the owner. I've tacked together most of the steelwork including detail , for a 36 footer ,ready for final welding and painting ,in three weeks .
Another advantage of the method is that the hulls are totally fair with no need for filler.
Over 100 have been built using my designs , and have covered thousands of miles of ocean including several circumnavigations.In my own boat I have cruised from BC to Mexico and two trips to Tonga and back in the last 5 years.
They have survived everything from 16 days pounding in 8 ft surf on the west coast of Baja , to a collision with a freighter in Gibralter, to pounding accross 200 yards of Fijian coral reef and being dragged back accross the same reef by a tug, to an 8 knot T-bone collision with a steel barge, all without significant dammage.
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Old 18-03-2004, 14:49   #2
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Brent,
Do you have any pictures of these fine vessels that your building? I'm a bit partial to steel myself, being a metalsmith. I concidered building myself but never had the space.
................................._/)
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Old 24-03-2004, 14:37   #3
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origami metal boats

There is a yahoo discusion group with a lot of pictures. Just do a search under origamiboats and pick the first one.
Brent Swain
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Old 04-07-2010, 17:32   #4
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This is one of the section of a boat design by Brent.
I think the engineering is quite not to the task. The lake of floor will make the structure unsafe.
Daniel

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Old 05-07-2010, 17:17   #5
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So dinosaur Dan is making his way to other sites, to try drag down the advancement of steel boatbuilding, to a pace he is capable of keeping up with.
I was told by old shipyard workers that when cutting torches arrived on the scene, they were thown in the ocean, so they wouldn't cost jobs.
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Old 05-07-2010, 17:42   #6
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Brent, why don't you address the engineering issue?
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Old 05-07-2010, 17:56   #7
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actually, i'm trying to understand the engineering they are talking about
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Old 05-07-2010, 18:22   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
So dinosaur Dan is making his way to other sites, to try drag down the advancement of steel boatbuilding, to a pace he is capable of keeping up with.
I was told by old shipyard workers that when cutting torches arrived on the scene, they were thown in the ocean, so they wouldn't cost jobs.
I am not that old, only 65. I am a naval architect for 40 years and I built in my shipyard a lot of vessel, from motor vessel to sailing boat and sailing ship.
The sea didn't change much, we have to be carefull how to design a vessel.
Your detail Brent is laking of the simple comprehension of ingeneering integrity.
This boat will be extremly dangerous, and no agency will let any boat yard building this boat, and no assurence will assure it.
It is not my lake of understanding in avancement of shipbuilding, it is just my professional assessement.
I don't know any story about old shipyard worker and cutting torches. Why this story when we talk about the lake of structural integrity in you design?
I will be glad to help you design correctly your yacht if you want.
Regards
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Old 05-07-2010, 18:30   #9
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actually, i'm trying to understand the engineering they are talking about
To answer to you simply, it is the lake of floor. The primary role of the floor is to tight the two side of the hull togeter.
A tank can't be taken as a structural member in that case since it is under the fulcrum (hinge) of the end of the frame. These frames should have been reunited and braced together by a floor.
Mostly when you have lateral keel, it is mendatory to have a brace to strenghten them, if not they will just fold down at the first hit, making a hole in the plating.
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Old 05-07-2010, 18:50   #10
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Ok, let me reflect some of this back to you.

The two portions of the hull are welded into a "V" = "\" + "/". To strengthen the two sides of the hull together you need frame portions and bulkheads - one side welded to "\"...the other side welded to "/" of the "V".

To keep the frame reinforced you are saying that a floor is necessary - like a stringer between frames? And the tank is not proper structurally for the job?

But, a tank is not taking up the complete hull, so I don't see how a tank is the issue here throughout the complete hull?

And I don't see how a floor really adds that much structurally to the design.

I do question why a tank is integrated into the design and its purpose, but that's not so much an engineering issue as a maintenance one. And the only thing that bothers me about the design is the welding at the bottom of the V, but that may be mute because the weld should be stronger than the steel itself.

Please correct me...
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Old 05-07-2010, 19:03   #11
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Unclear discussions on unclear drawings - is the drawing technically correct in the first place or is this a draft?

OP's input can help.

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Old 05-07-2010, 19:11   #12
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SaltyMonkey, it is very common in metal boats to build the tanks into the hull. Maybe not universal, but close I would say.
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Old 05-07-2010, 19:18   #13
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DeepFrz - on the other thread we just discussed that these days best practice is to not have them integrated. Granted, this is probably from an older design of Brent's
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Old 05-07-2010, 19:31   #14
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This is a floor on a steel boat.

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Old 05-07-2010, 19:53   #15
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So what does the 3/16 PL on Brent's sketch indicate? Looks like a floor to me
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