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Old 27-06-2006, 03:50   #1
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Opinions Alberg 35'

I know these boats are getting a bit long in the tooth, but just curious what people think of the design/build.

I am not in the market, but it's exactly the kind of boat that I would love to take on as a project in a few years. I had a smaller, similarly designed boat (full keel, narrow beam, etc) that took me through some really nasty weather. Great boat!
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Old 27-06-2006, 05:11   #2
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these are great boats. bulletproof and handy. only negative comments i've heard is they are a very wet ride. probably a dodger would help.
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Old 27-06-2006, 16:05   #3
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At about 40 years old, these are very long in the tooth, as is the very dated design.
Like antique cars, I’d suggest they could make very nice “toys” (and restoration hobby projects), but not very good everyday cruisers.
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Old 27-06-2006, 16:34   #4
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excellent vessel, great cruiser, get a bucket a windvane and go, maybe a rig too, or make it exciting and leave the mast at home bring a tablecloth and a broomhandle.
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Old 27-06-2006, 16:40   #5
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Try this link to some opinions about Albergs. They are good solid boats and can take heavier weather with more ease than say my Catalina 27. One comment talked about leaking and some fixes, didn't seem to be a big deal.

http://www.sailnet.com/boatchk/showp...duct=18&cat=39
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Old 27-06-2006, 20:29   #6
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The only thing I really fear from old fiberglass boats is osmosis ... and I have done a rather extensive osmosis job (by myself) already. Not fun, but not impossible by any stretch.

Beyond that, I love the look, feel and handling of traditional designs - and Sparkman & S designs are the best of the lot, IMHO.

And then there's safety - for me personally, that will always mean a full keel.
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Old 28-06-2006, 09:38   #7
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Watch out for those core eating worms, I hear they are migrating and will be a real danger soon.
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Old 28-06-2006, 10:55   #8
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The Alberg 35 is a good boat for some folks. I nearly bought a friend's boat years ago when he swallowed the anchor. I wouldn't worry about any serious osmosis on that boat. It seems that the early boats didn't have the blister problems that the late '70s and early '80s boats had (many because of fire retardent resin.) The big drawback for me was the interior space which was close to my old Catalina 25.
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Old 28-06-2006, 11:44   #9
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I truly appreciate an Alberg design like the 35. They are not a modern boat with lots of interior space, light displacement and short keels. However, they hold a course very well in a long passage and have an easy movement through the water in a chop and don't pound gowing to weather in a sea.
I think with all boats old or modern you must give up something to get something else (economics).
Polyestermites can be a problem with fiberglass boats made from old growth fiberglass trees. Core eating worms as WaLiveaboard mentioned are only a real danger in cored hulls. If they get into your cored deck and cabin top you'll feel them underfoot when you step on a squishy nest. Then just drill down and squirt them with a thinned epoxy mix.
Regards, --JohnL--
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Old 28-06-2006, 19:51   #10
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I agree with Skip on the tradeoffs: My old (other) boat was similar in design, but a 28, so the interior space was even smaller. How big it was "downstairs" didn't really matter much to me as her narrow beam allowed her to elegantly and quickly right herself in 40ft seas.

Essentially, I want a bigger version of that same boat, and the Alberg is the closest I've seen.

Other issues are build quality, which I assume to be pretty good with so many examples still in circulation ... but just wanted to sample opinions from others in the know.

Many thanks
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Old 19-07-2006, 12:27   #11
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Alberg 35

SNeuman,
The Alberg 35 is a great boat as far as a classic design. Not very roomy below but still liveable. I own an Alberg 37. Pretty much the same design except that the 37 has a keel stepped mast and the 35 is deck stepped. a fgew other things with the layout and then that most 35s are tiller steered and the 37 is wheel. I believe that most boats are pretty much bullet proof depending on their condition. The 35 was built by Pearson, a good all around boat builder and Alberg designed many classic boats for them. The 37 on the other hand was built by Whitby Boat Yards in Ontario, the builder of another great cruising boat. although very different, the Whitby 42 by Brewer.
I am a Great Lakes Sailor as I live in Chicago and some know what the Great Lakes are about and some don't and some ocean going sailors have said that they will never sail on the Great Lakes. My previous boat was '32 Jeanneau and let me tell you the feeling of comfort and safety between the two boats in heavy weather is incredible. I have also raced on a variety of boats and the A37 has a feeling that none of the newer boats have. It just has "I will get you home" written all over it.
Now here is the thing. The boat, if trimmed correctly will also put on a bit of speed. I was recently just day sailing when I started playing around dueling with a pretty new Beneteau 36.7 (no telling for the skipper and crew) but I easily passed them. As I did the skipper yelled out, "what is that?" to which I answered, "Alberg 37," and after a pause I added, "1967." You should have seen the guy's jaw drop.
So here is the thing, for coastal sailing I believe the 35 is a great boat for the money and for real blue water the 37 is fantastic. If you want to know more check out the floowing:

www.alberg37.org

and if you want to know about someone who actually lived on one ther is a book out called "If the Shoe fits" it is about a couple living on a 37 in the Northwest. It is pretty good and really funny.
Thanks,
J
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Old 19-07-2006, 15:23   #12
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wonderful design

As an owner of an Alberg design I can speak to it's both it's good and bad aspects.

Good: narrow hull, full keel

bad: narrow hull, full keel

It all depends on what you want the boat to do. The narrow hull makes for a great, BUT wet ride off shore. Get a dodger. It also makes it small down below. So if you want a floating condo, not this boat then.

The narrow hull along with the full keel also provides it's best characteristic for off shore work. It'll heave to wonderfully. And off shore that could be a biggy, especially if you're alone. The ability to heave to is a very very important safety characteristic. Nothings more dangerous than a boat off shore that can't be made to sit still and fore reach.

The narrow hull also makes for a much better movement when sailing with a quartering swell. I've sailed boats twice my Cape Dory 25D's size off the wind and thought I was on a twister ride. Every swell grabs the big fat stern and tries to steer the boat. It also pounded like crazy. Big wide hulls will do that. Especially the ones with wide canoe shaped bottoms. They are at their best at the dock.

You might look at Cape Dory if you like Alberg's designs.
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Old 20-07-2006, 11:34   #13
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GordMay seems to equate classic boats to classic cars. The equation doesn't work. I have a Studebaker Avanti and, while it's a great old car, it really doesn't handle as well as a new Honda Civic. On the other hand, I have a 50 year old, 32 foot British ocean racer that will, and does regularly, sail circles around most newer designs. She does not, like many new boats, have the volume of a Winnebago below, but, neither does she sail like a Winnebago as most new boats do. Find one of those old, narrow, full-keeled boats and go for a sail. You'll see I'm right.
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Old 20-07-2006, 18:23   #14
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As others have pointed out, a big part of the equation is emotional. I have always liked the basic design we're discussing. The lines speak to me and the form has always said "seaworthy!" I recently had first-hand experience that reinforced my conviction on the design's seaworthiness.

Certainly too it makes a difference on the type of cruising you will do - BUT, I think I will always want a boat that can "take it" even if I am just coastal cruising. I like sailing fast as much as the next guy or gal, and have had plenty of opportunity to sail on other people's fast boats (and used to race small catamarans!), but for my own boat, my priorities are different.

I am also interested in the Alberg 37 and the Vanguard. Again, not in the market now, but perhaps in a few years.
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Old 27-08-2006, 21:13   #15
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Although it's about an Alberg 30, not the 35, the gentleman that produces Cape Horn windvanes made a video about his circumnavigation. Gives you some real world perspective of cruising in that breed of boat.
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