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Old 26-01-2010, 17:00   #16
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One of these sailed UK to New Zealand....
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Old 26-01-2010, 17:23   #17
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Great post!

I recently bought a Herreshoff 28 ketch, which is a small boat design with a history of completing circumnavigations. Unfortunately it is currently on the hardstand for repair, but the post has helped my enthusiasm to continue modifying the ship as a pocket long-range cruiser.


As I live at a deep water port with no real estuary to cruise I am planning to do some real distances in this ship. The few times I have been to sea in adverse weather conditions I was really pleased with its deep and steady motion. Having a very low freeboard it might look amusingly close to the water and the ride might be a bit wet. Nevertheless, it seems like a really safe boat to have out in the open ocean.

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Old 02-02-2010, 02:36   #18
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Contessa 26 seems to have a good record. I would trust it, but the people I have seen circumnavigate in it seem to get a bit wild eyed. See bigoceans.com
Hey, I heard that! But yes, crossing oceans in small sail boats tends to send one wild eyed.
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Old 05-02-2010, 16:11   #19
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Well, I do not see anything to send anybody wild eyed sailing a 26 footer. They may not be the most comfortable nor the safest but it is 100% doable and, in fact, much easier than in a bigger boat.

But since a 26 footer is easy to sail and a well laid-out 30+ footer even more so, then all other things equal, I would pick the bigger boat (off-thread drift).

Anyway, 26, is imho NOT too small by a large margin.

b.
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Old 05-02-2010, 17:47   #20
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a 45-footer would be a bit too small for me.
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Old 05-02-2010, 20:21   #21
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a 45-footer would be a bit too small for me.
Ahhh..... A Big Mac Fan..????.... but seriously...
it all boils down to how much or how little you need to live your life...
Some only need a Mini... others a Humvee....
I've lived on 21ftr's and up to 37ftrs.... the bigger you go the more money you need.... equation... less time on the water...
Unless your retired with big bucks..
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Old 07-02-2010, 07:44   #22
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What in your opinion is the smallest size monohull you'd cross an ocean with?
I tend to shy away from the occasional stuntmen who sporadically attempt these things on a whim and a prayer, but the more seamanlike efforts of folks like Sven Yrvind, Serge Testa, Manry, Spiess and the like who have spent years researching the proper means available to take microcruisers across great oceans have often intrigued me. It is clear from many years of testing that the smaller the boat, have a noticeably higher likelihood that a knockdown will eventuate the passage (or even capsize, I believe Serge had several in his circumnavigation – but despite conventional appearances his metal vessel was built more like a floating submarine), but the other side is that smallish boats can be (if the builder actually does it…) built proportionately far stronger than their bigger sisters, especially with modern materials… but these days it is no longer a question of whether it can be done (assuming a properly built and equipped vessel), it is more a question of whether the potential skipper is competent to the task, and comfortable with the more rigorous and austere accommodations that these smaller vessels necessitate… the back-packer mindset seems able to thrive on these, but the I’d guess us corpulent couch-potatoes need not apply…

I’m content that a well-built Flick (20’ LOA, more or less) is well within the realm of reason, and folks like John Welsford have designed extremely well thought-out boats rather smaller that look entirely capable if I was so inclined… I believe John drew the transoceanic lower limit at about a dozen feet and declined to design one much smaller, so experienced microcruiser designers seem to have a lower limit… I note that in the end, the Around-in-Ten race seemed to fizzle as (just a guess), the skippers/organizers rethought the likelihood of success…
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Old 07-02-2010, 19:05   #23
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Anything much smaller than 20ft is just a stunt but around that size you get viable boats such as the afforementioned Flicka representing the heavy brigade and Trekka the light brigade,both of which have proven sucessful cruisers.
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Old 10-02-2010, 03:19   #24
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A 21 foot boat with just 150L of water and a hand pumped watermaker for the rest. A single burner stove to boil all the water and make a flask for the following 24 hours. Oh and an average cruising speed of 2 knots Makes our 31 foot yacht look palatial.
That sounds like my crossing

I only took 150 litres of pure drinking water, plus a 24 pack of Coke and 12 litres of orange juice. And no watermaker.

I turned up in Barbados 30 days later with nearly enough water to 'do it again' (with little in reserve of course)... At an average speed of about 4kts. I drank 1.5 litres of water a day, kept in containers of the same size, and distributed around the boat to balance it.

I ate pasta boiled primarily in saltwater to save drinking water, and various potato dishes, and eggs for breakfast.

This thread is purely speculative and nearly pointless, as has already been said... You could do it in a barrel if you wanted. You could also probably do Cape Horn in a barrel too, and maybe you could crawl to work on your hands and knees to save transport costs...
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:27   #25
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Back in the late 60s and early 70s up to 30 Hurley 22s crossed the Atlantic and at least one sailed across the Pacific to Australia, but folk were hardier back then. It could be done now but I think I would go for a bigger yacht and more comfort.
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:23   #26
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Minitransats 6.50's are just under 22 ft. They can do it. And fast!!
Or look at this little cutie the Minibee at www.beeboat.com
based on the minitransats, but also with ocean crossing capabilities! And at 30.000 euros!!

But, I wouldn't for the life of me. Just horrified to think about the discomfort!
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:35   #27
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Minitransats 6.50's are just under 22 ft. They can do it. And fast!!
!
Yes but not safely! Man the Minitransat is a good proving ground for Vendee wannabes but it is borderline insane!
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:33   #28
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@Geminidawn : not safely? I beg to differ. Unformortable yes, but unsafe, certainly not. You just have to know what you are doing.
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Old 10-02-2010, 11:51   #29
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@Geminidawn : not safely? I beg to differ. Unformortable yes, but unsafe, certainly not. You just have to know what you are doing.
Hey, it's just my opinion, it dosen't mean I don't admire the people that do.
I know the racing boats, the open 60's,70's, and the Mini 21's, I've worked on a few of them and I know their strenght to weight ratios and I've seen those ratios fail sometimes in extreme conditions.
Cruise to the Carribbean I can do, skate accross the ocean by the seat of your pants takes a rare breed and I know I'm not one of them.
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Old 10-02-2010, 12:09   #30
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To retain some modicum of comfort my minimum would be 45 fot or so. Safety, I wouldn't be concerned about crossing on a mini, pretty cool boats.

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What in your opinion is the smallest size monohull you'd cross an ocean with?
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