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Old 30-10-2009, 22:11   #46
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You asked for some advise...

Do you really want a 48' project boat? At 27, I'd imagine that you could easily cozy into a 38 footer (one optimized for cruising/liveaboard... the S&S looks like a former club racer), and save literally an order of magnitude (10x) in maint costs. It may not seem like it to the sailing magazines, but even 38' is a lot of boat.

I predict that this project would be too much for what you'd want to handle, unless you're REALLY into boat maintainence.

Even a 197X 48' yawl in bristol condition would be an impressive ongoing project just to maintain (assuming you aren't rich enough to simply throw money at it).
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Old 31-10-2009, 11:54   #47
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The co-signer (my dad) won't sign for a smallish sailboat. It will be at least a year, probably two, before I can take out a loan without a co-signer, unless they really loosen things up again.

This is one that I would prefer. Looks to have been smartly updated and taken care of, and I wouldn't be in very much debt if I decided living aboard wasn't for me: 1968 Columbia 36 sailboat for sale in Washington . Same boat on YW with different pics: http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi..._id=74772&url=
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Old 31-10-2009, 12:03   #48
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Aloha jm21,
I didn't realize this was going to be a first boat for you. I think the 48 is too big a project and I'd get something sailable now if I were you. My earlier point was that just because a boat has been on the hard for a long time it is not a lost cause and she does have beautiful lines.
Check the links and book for recommendations after my signature. IMnotsoHO Do not co-sign with anyone and don't be forced into a larger than needed boat. It will be like an anchor tying you down.
regards
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Old 31-10-2009, 12:32   #49
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The co-signer (my dad) won't sign for a smallish sailboat. It will be at least a year, probably two, before I can take out a loan without a co-signer, unless they really loosen things up again.

This is one that I would prefer. Looks to have been smartly updated and taken care of, and I wouldn't be in very much debt if I decided living aboard wasn't for me: 1968 Columbia 36 sailboat for sale in Washington . Same boat on YW with different pics: 1968 Columbia Cruising Sloop Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com
Wow, the two boats you have linked are at total opposites of the spectrum. The first 48 footer will need a ton of work and effort but could be a great find for the right buyer (probably not you, from what you have said) if it can be bought for a lot less than 50k. the Columbia seems to be in great shape and beautifully maintained. But I think it's still priced too high in this market.

Crealock was a great designer, Columbia not such a great builder... but they might have been ok in the 60's before they started getting sloppy with their quality control.

When looking at boats, try to use this book for your inspection guide:

Amazon.com: Inspecting the Aging Sailboat (The International Marine Sailboat Library) (0639785803447): Don Casey: Books

Better yet, if you are serious about buying a sailboat:

Amazon.com: Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual: Including Inspecting the Aging Sailboat, Sailboat Hull and Deck Repair, Sailboat Refinishing, Sailbo (9780071462846): Don Casey: Books

The second book includes the first, plus just about everything else you need to know about maintaining sailboats. It's an invaluable book.
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Old 31-10-2009, 12:44   #50
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In looking at the pictures of that Columbia, I noted that the interior layout seems kind of strange. The nav station is up forward right behind the v-berth... a very poor location IMO. And the galley layout is not going to be very useful at sea, unless things are quite calm. I assume there is a quarterberth, but I can't tell from the pics.

But most important to me is a cockpit that seems almost dysfunctional for sailing, with that wheel clogging things up and the primary winches located so far aft. If it were my boat, I'd replace the wheel with a tiller and move the winches. (but that's just me... I really hate wheels on smaller boats particularly when they are in cockpits that were clearly not designed for wheels)
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Old 31-10-2009, 12:45   #51
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Thanks for the book recommendations. Yes, we have very different ideas about size. They just bought a "small" 2,000 square foot home for their retirement. Why a retired couple who plan to spend most of the year cruising or traveling needs a house that big is beyond me. Anyways, getting a little off-topic.

Yes, the Columbia seems to be pretty over-priced. Looking at other ads on the net asking prices are $10-25k.

I don't really have any use for a nav station and wouldn't be sailing at sea for a long time.
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Old 31-10-2009, 12:59   #52
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An eclosed wheel makes a lot of sense for sailing in the PNW (read: motoring 90% of the time, many times in the rain).
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Old 31-10-2009, 13:05   #53
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An eclosed wheel makes a lot of sense for sailing in the PNW (read: motoring 90% of the time, many times in the rain).
Yes, I hear you about the PNW. Very beautiful, but the breeze is way too fickle for me. It's trawler or motorsailer country, IMO.
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Old 31-10-2009, 15:48   #54
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All boats, even boats you have had for 20 years and taken great care of, need work. If this is your first boat, get a smaller, newer one, because you will still be doing a lot of work.

If you really want this one, get two surveys by two completely unrelated people, get repair estimated from two completely unrelated yards, and then see where you are.

Remember, caviat emptor!!
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Old 01-11-2009, 10:50   #55
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Well, the owner sent me an e-mail that they were too busy today so I won't be viewing the boat. Sounding like it's more of a project than I want to take on so might just bag the idea.
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