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Old 08-09-2016, 11:14   #1
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Moody 54

Hello all!

We have been a long time in the boat search realm. Finances, kids, moves all keep conspiring against us. We had this two year plan going but it kept being a rolling two years as something new would crop up. At Christmas last year we committed to another two year plan and when June rolled around and my husband mentioned two years I mentioned 18 months left. There will always be an excuse to keep putting this off. It is time to deal in real time finances and move forward.

So our plan all along has been to buy a boat, take some time to get to know it and then set off for the pacific. We have discussed different ways of getting there and they are still in the we will discuss that later stage. More because of timing issues than anything.

My husband has had his heart set on a Passport 515. We have annoyed the builder going on 6 years now. As I said this has been a long time in the making. So we were transferred from Dubai to Amsterdam on the first of July. Out of curiosity I did a local search of boats and found a 2004 Moody 54 that was gorgeous. My husband was immediately smitten with the advertisement. Being that I was stateside and he has been traveling to Africa we haven't gotten to go look at the boat yet.

Now the point of this all.

I am not very familiar with Moody's. There is a lot of information on the brand in general but not a lot on this particular model. So I have some questions.

How sea worthy are they? I read on article that equates them to a costal sailor.
What are the known flaws in this year/model?
Being that they are cored I understand they are stiff, does this also make them tender?
Would this be a suitable boat for a couple? (Let's not get into the its too large argument)

Let's start there.







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Old 08-09-2016, 11:40   #2
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Re: Moody 54

Quote:
How sea worthy are they? I read on article that equates them to a costal sailor.
What are the known flaws in this year/model?
Being that they are cored I understand they are stiff, does this also make them tender?
Would this be a suitable boat for a couple? (Let's not get into the its too large argument)
I wouldn't consider it a coastal sailer, I'd take it to Hawaii tomorrow.
Suitable for a couple but a real handful, there's a lot of boat for 2 to maintain and sail.
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Old 08-09-2016, 12:01   #3
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Re: Moody 54

You need to talk to Dockhead. He has one and is a long time contributer to this forum. Im sure he will chime in shortly .

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Old 08-09-2016, 14:40   #4
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Re: Moody 54

The Moody 54 is huge. I think the Moody 45 DS is a better size for a couple, or even a small family, particularly if your finances aren't there yet.

I strongly considered the 45 myself, but so few have been sold in the United States that I never had a chance to see one. However, I noticed the mast height above the waterline is unusually tall for a boat that size (78' or 23.8m!) so it wouldn't work for anyone wanting to go down the ICW on the East Coast of the United States. I can only assume the 54 is much higher still. In the Pacific it shouldn't be a problem though.

It's looks like it would have somewhat poor visibility from the helmstations, something to consider, however. However, the big tradeoff is you have an nav station to sit at during bad weather, with great visibility outside.

In other forums, I remember that some people criticized the sliding glass cockpit door to the salon as unseaworthy. That is nonsense. The same kind of door is standard on nearly every catamaran, and it's simply not an issue.
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Old 08-09-2016, 14:51   #5
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Re: Moody 54

Talk to Dochead, then ignore everyone trying to convince you to downsize, buy the boat you want then look forward.

I was on an Oyster 82 today, a boat easily handled by two or three people. A Moody 54 will be a cinch for two people.
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Old 08-09-2016, 15:39   #6
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Re: Moody 54

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I strongly considered the 45 myself, but so few have been sold in the United States that I never had a chance to see one.
Just saw a brand new 45DS 2 weeks ago while returning to harbor, we went about 1/2 mile out of our way just to look at it a little longer. Felt a lot like spotting a YETI, you see it but can't believe it.
The cabin does strike one as being remarkable for catamaran like size while still having useable side decks.
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Old 08-09-2016, 15:45   #7
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Re: Moody 54

Reconsider the Passport. A better made boat.
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Old 08-09-2016, 16:05   #8
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Re: Moody 54

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calif.Ted View Post
Just saw a brand new 45DS 2 weeks ago while returning to harbor, we went about 1/2 mile out of our way just to look at it a little longer. Felt a lot like spotting a YETI, you see it but can't believe it.
The cabin does strike one as being remarkable for catamaran like size while still having useable side decks.
That's the Dehler-built, German Moody. She's talking about the former Moody company, made in England. Totally different boat made by a different company.

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Old 08-09-2016, 16:07   #9
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Re: Moody 54

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Originally Posted by Kenomac View Post
Talk to Dochead, then ignore everyone trying to convince you to downsize, buy the boat you want then look forward.

I was on an Oyster 82 today, a boat easily handled by two or three people. A Moody 54 will be a cinch for two people.
Indeed. Modern boats of this size are no problem for a couple. I've single-handed mine across the North Sea.

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Old 08-09-2016, 16:18   #10
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Re: Moody 54

Quote:
Originally Posted by brookiesailor View Post
Hello all!

We have been a long time in the boat search realm. Finances, kids, moves all keep conspiring against us. We had this two year plan going but it kept being a rolling two years as something new would crop up. At Christmas last year we committed to another two year plan and when June rolled around and my husband mentioned two years I mentioned 18 months left. There will always be an excuse to keep putting this off. It is time to deal in real time finances and move forward.

So our plan all along has been to buy a boat, take some time to get to know it and then set off for the pacific. We have discussed different ways of getting there and they are still in the we will discuss that later stage. More because of timing issues than anything.

My husband has had his heart set on a Passport 515. We have annoyed the builder going on 6 years now. As I said this has been a long time in the making. So we were transferred from Dubai to Amsterdam on the first of July. Out of curiosity I did a local search of boats and found a 2004 Moody 54 that was gorgeous. My husband was immediately smitten with the advertisement. Being that I was stateside and he has been traveling to Africa we haven't gotten to go look at the boat yet.

Now the point of this all.

I am not very familiar with Moody's. There is a lot of information on the brand in general but not a lot on this particular model. So I have some questions.

How sea worthy are they? I read on article that equates them to a costal sailor.
What are the known flaws in this year/model?
Being that they are cored I understand they are stiff, does this also make them tender?
Would this be a suitable boat for a couple? (Let's not get into the its too large argument)

Let's start there.







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To get oriented with this boat, look at Contests (made in Netherlands), Halberg Rassey, and Oyster, and see which one you like best.

The English-built M54, designed by Bill Dixon, is similar to these and very different from a Passport.

The M54 is more modern, not as beautifully finished inside, MUCH faster and much better sailing, stronger construction. Much greater hull volume than Passport 515; maybe

For something in between, look at Oysters - very beautiful fitout, very elegant interior design, designed for great comfort in every tiny detail, wonderful view from high raised salon, very strong and seaworthy, heavy and not as fast as Moody, but more modern than Passport.

Contest, Discovery also worth a look.

Euro boats are very different from American ones - look at a few before you decide.

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Old 08-09-2016, 20:43   #11
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Re: Moody 54

I have been on both boats. I like both.

I did not quite like the single steering wheel on the old one. Made me feel like one of the old Oysters.

You may get a real challenge sorting out refit and upgrades if you are buying the older model - they are just hitting the age where most / many / some systems will require replacement / fixing up / intensive maintenance - depending on how much stuff has been already upgraded by ex owners.

Keep sharp eye on teak condition, engine, power systems; then on rigging on sails. The first three can be major cash eaters.

Make sure you get a thorough survey with the boat both on dry and in the water.

Seaworthy? Well, feels so.

The new boat is VERY nice. A bit complicated in some areas though. Still, a major step up from the earlier model (I think another boatyard too?)

Cheers,
b.
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Old 09-09-2016, 05:02   #12
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Re: Moody 54

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Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
I have been on both boats. I like both.

I did not quite like the single steering wheel on the old one. Made me feel like one of the old Oysters.

You may get a real challenge sorting out refit and upgrades if you are buying the older model - they are just hitting the age where most / many / some systems will require replacement / fixing up / intensive maintenance - depending on how much stuff has been already upgraded by ex owners.

Keep sharp eye on teak condition, engine, power systems; then on rigging on sails. The first three can be major cash eaters.

Make sure you get a thorough survey with the boat both on dry and in the water.

Seaworthy? Well, feels so.

The new boat is VERY nice. A bit complicated in some areas though. Still, a major step up from the earlier model (I think another boatyard too?)

Cheers,
b.
One of a number of things I don't like about my boat is the wheel and cockpit arrangement -- yes, like Oysters from the 2000s. You have to climb over cockpit seats to get around the wheel, and people lounging are always in the way of people sailing. The Swan arrangement with separate working and lounging cockpits is better.


As to the new German made "Moodys" -- Hanse Group bought the brand to use for its premium models, when the original Moody company went bankrupt (it was the oldest yacht-building company in the world when it went under).

The new Moodys are made by robots with typical mass produced techniques, with hull liners, prefab cabinetry, etc. They are just premium Hanses or Dehlers.

The English-built Moodys were hand made, with stick-built interiors, etc.

So totally and completely different boats sharing hardly anything but the name.
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Old 09-09-2016, 07:14   #13
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Re: Moody 54

Thank you guys for your help. The moody I am looking at is the English made Moody not the DS model. As with any boat of this age systems and equipment will have to be carefully looked at by a surveyor and ourselves. Part of the reason why we are giving ourselves lag time in the beginning is to be able to replace old systems, and make sure things are in order (like a best as anything can be) while we still are working. Spread out the expenses and cover the with a pay check.

We still love Passports. One of our issues is that we are here and they are in the US. At the moment there is only one used center cockpit for sale in Florida. The price is on the higher end of what they have been selling for. Everything is negotiable. But then we would have to sail it here. We are in oil and gas. By the time we got it here we may just have to turn it around and go back. Which would all be on me as hubby hasn't gotten a vacation this year. Our personal situation is complicated and not really what I am asking about.

So back to the moody...

Dockhead I appreciate your comments. The wheel on the passport is the same. You have to get up on the side step to get around it.

They say they are a stiff boat, does that also mean they are tender?

I appreciate the comments about the suitability for the ICW. In truth that is not something that really has appealed to me. I have done some ocean miles and far prefer that to motoring. There is not a lot of them in the US and they are wired for 220. It is unlikely we would change that as it would require changing all the wires and the pumps. Not only that the majority of places we would go outside the US are 220.

I know they are a cored boat with teak decks. Both a source of issues if not properly looked after. This boat has been used seasonally and kept in a heated storage. Again we will have it thoroughly surveyed.

54 feet is a big boat. I understand that. But as some say it is all in what you are used to.

Hubby comes home next week. I am going to try to arrange to see it the following weekend hoping they haven't pulled it for the season. The weather has been beautiful so we may be lucky.



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Old 09-09-2016, 07:40   #14
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Re: Moody 54

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Originally Posted by brookiesailor View Post
. . .
So back to the moody...

Dockhead I appreciate your comments. The wheel on the passport is the same. You have to get up on the side step to get around it.

They say they are a stiff boat, does that also mean they are tender?

I appreciate the comments about the suitability for the ICW. In truth that is not something that really has appealed to me. I have done some ocean miles and far prefer that to motoring. There is not a lot of them in the US and they are wired for 220. It is unlikely we would change that as it would require changing all the wires and the pumps. Not only that the majority of places we would go outside the US are 220.

I know they are a cored boat with teak decks. Both a source of issues if not properly looked after. This boat has been used seasonally and kept in a heated storage. Again we will have it thoroughly surveyed.

54 feet is a big boat. I understand that. But as some say it is all in what you are used to.

Hubby comes home next week. I am going to try to arrange to see it the following weekend hoping they haven't pulled it for the season. The weather has been beautiful so we may be lucky.
Stiff and tender are opposites. The M54 is a very strong boat, built for the toughest ocean conditions, and has lots of stability (that is, "stiff"), but in this is no different from comparable European boats which I mentioned above.

Compared to the Passport -- the Moody has a flatter underbody profile which makes it more powerful (more form stability), but less so than the latest post-modern "wedgie" European boats (like Hanses). So that means the Moody is somewhere in between Passport and the post-modern boats. Moody will heel less than the Passport but will pound more.

M54 is totally unsuitable for the ICW, so scratch it off your list if you need it for that. Air draft is over 75', water draft 7'6". This is a boat for the ocean, not for the ICW. BTW, that also applies to the Ijsselmeer and Frisian Islands -- bit too deep draft for that.

Cored hull requires no maintenance. Some people are afraid of them (core will rot if there is a leak in the hull envelope), but has so many advantages that you cannot buy a high end European boat without them other than Oyster. Cored hull is much stronger and much lighter, but more expensive to make and carries small risk of problems later. If the survey shows no problems, I wouldn't worry about it.

Teak deck is another matter of personal preference. Almost zero maintenance, but can be ruined in various ways (e.g. pressure washer), and horrendously expensive to replace. Wear out faster in the tropics. I like them, but would not want them in a hot climate.
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Old 09-09-2016, 07:42   #15
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Re: Moody 54

How in the world do they actually keep a Moody 54 in "heated storage?" Do they take the mast down anually?
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