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Old 14-05-2009, 07:57   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian Van H View Post
C'mon, this is easy... Go Mono now, and get a multi when you're too old to sail!
Not so fast... .... revise this to say

...tired of spilling my beer..... too old to put up with cramped quarters.... too experienced to listen to the ladies ask yet again, " does it have to lean over?", and too wise to rely upon one engine...

and we'd be in perfect agreement.

You're confusing wisdom with masochism!!

I haven't posted in a mono / multi thread in a real long time. I had forgotten how easily the mods descend and delete my posts. I guess it comes with the territory, although they do seem to be a might touchy this morning.
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Old 14-05-2009, 08:03   #32
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OK, I'll take a stab at "un-biased".

Speed, comparable to mono's. The Atlantic Rally to Bermuda, beam reaching in 15 to 25 knot breeze, first to Bermuda was the Swan 56, second was the Catana 50. Or, go to SA and read about the Gunboat 48 sailing in the Caribbean 600. Draw your own conclusions............

Comfort, mono's and multi's have different motions. Best thing to do is sail both and decide what is most comfortable for YOU!

Safety, actuary tables show they are about even. Some production cats do appear to sink, almost all production mono's sink. Most production mono's are self righting, no production cats are self righting.

Room, the hands down winner is the cat.

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Originally Posted by meyermm View Post
Having only sailed monohulls but not one eyed when it comes to change I am still not convinced about Cats. If you talk to Cat owners they all say the same thing, fast, comfortable, roomy and safe. Does anyone no the stats re sinking's etc in bad weather versus monohull. I agree that they have many ++'s but it would be nice to get some un biased opinions.
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Old 14-05-2009, 08:09   #33
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Room, the hands down winner is the cat.
Admittedly unbiased yet, an interesting yardstick for sure. Now, lets get to the real questions before us this morning. How many "bow bunnies" can you fit on your foredeck?

How many Queen or King sized berths does your boat have?

How does one fit a screen over a port hole?

Although I will acknowledge that it takes two A/C units to cool the inside of my boat. I think I can live with that
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Old 14-05-2009, 08:14   #34
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Bow bunnies? Hmm never thought of it that way. Not sure how many fit on our foredeck but the J is 26 foot and beam is 15 foot so maybe a bevy?

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Originally Posted by Tropic Cat View Post
Admittedly unbiased yet, an interesting yardstick for sure. Now, lets get to the real questions before us this morning. How many "bow bunnies" can you fit on your foredeck?

How many Queen or King sized berths does your boat have?

How does one fit a screen over a port hole?

Although I will acknowledge that it takes two A/C units to cool the inside of my boat. I think I can live with that
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Old 14-05-2009, 09:09   #35
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Bow bunnies? Hmm never thought of it that way. Not sure how many fit on our foredeck but the J is 26 foot and beam is 15 foot so maybe a bevy?
Why Joli, that's positively Catamaranish!!
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Old 14-05-2009, 09:42   #36
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what it really comes down to, do you like the look of mulits? then do you have enough money to keep her and a place?
b.t.w. I can fit 10 to 12 bunnies on the foredeck!
As for bunks 3 can stretch out on the queen bunk, and two each in the two rear doubles, that's 7, could make the dinette into a bunk so three more there, hum, that's 10, well I better limited myself to 9 bunnies, (need room for me! too).
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Old 14-05-2009, 09:54   #37
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Well there's room and then there's room. One knock on multihulls is that their performance starts to suffer when fully loaded-- less so than a monohull. Is this true?
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Old 14-05-2009, 10:00   #38
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Despite having owned and sailed numerous monohulls and currently a multihull, I do not claim to be unbiased. In my opinion, this debate is futile not only because of the inherent bias in so many (all?) of us, but because we are to some degree comparing apples and oranges. No boat is right for everyone. Certainly, there are no absolute answers.

Issues such as appearance, of course, are almost completely subjective and hence largely irrelevant to any rational debate: some will prefer the space-age, 'Millenium Falcon' look of many modern catamarans, whereas others will find anything other than a traditional monohull with long overhangs and a sweet shear to be ugly.

Even items such as interior space/layout are not absolutes: some will prefer a tight, dark, cozy and traditional interior over something larger and more bright. Simply put, bigger is not necessarily better for everyone, particularly since it will often come at the expense of greater docking fees.

Comparisons of sailing attributes such as the motion at sea involve subjective preferences, but also the need to assess the individual boat: it is decidedly not just a matter of heeling versus not heeling, nor even of pounding versus not pounding (and indeed, many modern monohulls with flat sections aft will pound mercilessly when sailing upwind in heavy seas). The real question is, what motion do you prefer and how does the individual boat you are considering deliver in that regard?

'Performance' on the whole varies dramatically from boat, but let us just say: most modern monohulls will point higher than most modern multihulls, whereas most modern multihulls will be more stable/comfortable downwind, and faster on a reach than most modern monohulls. Again, the preference is largely subjective and should be geared towards the type of sailing that you are most apt to do.

Dual engines of course provide redundancy and assist in maneuverability under power, especially in reverse - but they also add to cost and the time required for maintenance. What matters most to you?

Although this area leads to polarization, perhaps more than any other in the multi versus mono debate, IMO safety is another area which requires an individual assessment of priorities. Here is my best effort at some unweighted pros and cons on the issue of safety. Of particular importance is the fact that they are unweighted; to some, the fact that a capsized mulithull stays capsized would outweight all other considerations. To others, the ability to avoid sinking would do the same.

1. Most multihulls are unsinkable, providing an additional margin of safety if holed and taking on water; most monohulls are not.
2. Most monohulls point higher than most multihulls, providing an additional margin of safety if required to claw your way off a lee shore in bad conditions.
3. Most multihulls are more stable downwind, having less of a tendancy to roll and/or broach when running before a storm than most monohulls.
4. Most monohulls will self-right if capsized, whereas multihulls will not; on the other hand, most multihulls are more resistant to knockdowns/capsize than most monohulls.
5. Most multihulls provide a more stable platform in heavy conditions from which to reef, inspect/repair rigging, deploy sea-anchors/drogues than most monohulls.
6. Most mulithulls have shallower draft than most monohulls and hence are better able to avoid groundings.
7. Most multihulls (at least catamarans) have the redundancy of twin engines and hence are better able to deal with the failure of an engine, loss of/damage to a prop, than most monohulls.
8. It is easier/safer to carry gear/tools etc. from the interior of most multihulls out into the cockpit, than it is to climb the companionway stairs while carrying the same in most monohulls.

This is, of course, not a comprehensive list and I am sure that even these propositions, as stated, will spark some debate/disagreement. They are not intended to be definitive, but rather to be illustrative of the fact that even on the singular issue of safety, there are no absolute answers as to which type of vessel is to be preferred.

Brad
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Old 14-05-2009, 10:19   #39
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Southern Star, brilliant post if a bit heavy on facts. You know as well as I do that minds have been made up on the mono / multi debate ions ago. People have their 'own' set of 'facts' and seldom have much use for new ones.
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Old 14-05-2009, 10:19   #40
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As others have said, this is a well worn thread so Iíll just make a couple of quick comments

meyermm askes whether people would prefer a 100ft monohull or a 35-40ft catamaran for ocean sailing

Even if I was offered a 100ft superyacht (no way could I ever afford one) Iíd still go for the 35-40ft catamaran. Iíve just come back from 6 months cruising from Annapolis south to the Bahamas in our 34ft Romany catamaran.

True, we could have sailed in the Chesapeake with a big boat, but not CRUISED there. You cannot get anywhere in the ICW with a sailboat much over 45ft, while the Abacos are limited to about a 6ft draft. In other words we couldnít have made the cruise we made last winter in a 100ft monohull.

I like to sail/live with my partner; I donít want servants in my house, nor on my boat. And there is no way a couple can cruise a 100ft boat without help.

Most people don't actually like to sail an ocean. Instead they want to get to the other side and cruise there.

Dockhead might be surprised to hear that I didnít like the Norseman either. You can see my comments on my FAQís page. Not all catamarans are the same!

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Many people think men are attractive/beautiful. I donít.


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Old 14-05-2009, 10:23   #41
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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Many people think men are attractive/beautiful. I don’t.
LOL, I had to read that line twice.

I had thought the OP wanted stats. As in facts. Unfortunately, when they were posted ...he argued them..apparently they weren't 'his' facts.

Go figure.
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Old 14-05-2009, 10:25   #42
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Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Many people think men are attractive/beautiful. I don’t.

That has to be a CLASSIC!.........i2f
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Old 14-05-2009, 11:03   #43
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Sailed across the Anegada Passage earlier this season, St Thomas to St Martin. Seas the usual 5-8" and wind 15-20kts. We heeled a bit and there was some spray flying but we were comfortable behind the hardtop/dodger. Could not help but wonder what this passage to weather would have been like on a catamaran. Any thoughts anyone? We would like all passages to be reaches or off the wind but it does not always work out that way. By the way, the bareboat cats we see in the Virgins seem to point as well as the bareboat monos.
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Old 14-05-2009, 11:12   #44
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I think you should get a monohull.

Fact: when a monohull hits a container in a hurricane and sinks it goes straight down out of sight, with a cat it washes up on shore and your next of kin has to pay for the removal costs.

Fact: When everyone wises up and buys a multi it will drive the price up and I would like to buy another one in the next 5 years. I'm hoping it will still be a buyers market.

So all you multi-hull owners quit trying to convince folks to buy one, it isn't in our best interest.
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Old 14-05-2009, 11:24   #45
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So all you multi-hull owners quit trying to convince folks to buy one, it isn't in our best interest.
Actually, I'd like a larger one myself..... Point taken....... Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhh...........
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