Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 02-09-2015, 06:38   #46
Registered User

Join Date: May 2009
Location: holland michigan
Boat: Gulfstar 50 ketch
Posts: 456
Images: 3
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

I have the same mindset as Family van. When I was a kid the family went camping if the forecast sucked we still went. It's Michigan half of the time the forecast is wrong anyway.
We treat vacation start and or end as a "delivery". We also buy boats with this in mind. Part of our "compromise" is a feathering two blade prop. Great for sailing but undersized and pitched for motoring.
No one boat is perfect for all or all conditions.
Mine would be a J boat type for day sails that turned into a pilothouse heavy cruiser for trips. Oh and it needs to cost less than a mid size car like our current boat did lol.
__________________

__________________
ctl411 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2015, 07:05   #47
Moderator Emeritus
 
David M's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: San Francisco Bay
Boat: research vessel
Posts: 10,152
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

You are going to need to spend some time on both types of boats in order to figure out your preference.

I figure that if you go cruising that you cannot be on a time budget. Also, as I get older comfort becomes more important and speed for the sake of a thrill is also less important.

Is it the journey or the destination?
__________________

__________________
David

Life begins where land ends.
David M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2015, 07:12   #48
Registered User
 
Ericson38's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Virginia
Boat: Taswell 49 Cutter
Posts: 187
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

Heavy boats usually have more fuel and water onboard, and storage is better than on medium and light displacement boats, for the most part.

Motion at sea is a function of a bunch of things, and just being heavier for its length won't always make it better, although it usually does.

How hard the turn of the bilge is at mid body, how much lateral plane there is underwater for it's size (keel-rudder area), the degree of overhangs fore and aft, the ballast to weight ratio, the CG, and the rotational moments of inertia have a bearing on ride 'quality'. For instance, a ketch will have a greater resistance to quick rolling accelerations than a sloop, given the same sail area, due to the increased weight of the rig.

I have spent a lot of time on boats between 35-40 ft in the 80s and 90s and, with about the same length and displacement, the beamier ones tended to roll sharply in chop and light winds, while being harder to steer in a straight line, and just felt out of their element, when the sea was confused. But they had more volume below. In a hard blow, they were faster off the wind, as they had a higher righting moment from the beam factor.

Between a 40 ft boat with a 12 foot beam and a 38 ft boat with a 13 ft beam, both with the same displacement, the 40 will feel smaller inside and will typically sail better on the wind and have an easier overall ride.

Join a local sailing club, and you will be able to talk about a lot of boats with a lot of people, first hand. Nothing like having a sea chat while at sea.

Expand your reading to get some additional input-


Perry's comments on double enders-
Sail Far Live Free - Sailboats, Sailing News, and Gear: Double Enders According to Perry (Guest Post by Bob Perry)


General offshore-
http://www.practical-sailor.com/blog/The-Best-Sailboats-for-the-High-Seas-11604-1.htmlhttp://www.practical-sailor.com/blog/The-Best-Sailboats-for-the-High-Seas-11604-1.html
__________________
Ericson38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2015, 07:48   #49
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 217
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

Multihull type here who has owned several monos.

Preference is for lighter boats.

Yes, they do have a faster, more abrupt motion, but the upside is you stay dry and it takes waves like a cork (as opposed to a half sunken bottle). Prefer the dry ride of a boat that pops up and over the waves vs one that submarines through them.
__________________
2hullvenus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2015, 05:13   #50
Registered User
 
dcstrng's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Virginia
Boat: Oday30-B24
Posts: 581
Images: 52
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
An observation... The good news is that most decent quality boats will take care of you. A look around anchorages where everyone has had to make a longish passage to get there will show that there are boats of every description bobbing about. They all made it there...
Sound reasoning !
__________________
Larry
http://www.sailblogs.com/member/awing/
dcstrng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2015, 15:13   #51
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,751
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

As others have said - everything here is a compromise. And different people will cut this compromise differently. But make mine light, strong and fast. Fast as hell. More size will help alleviate the loss of seaworthiness due to lightness, but will do nothing to alleviate the cost impact. So my preferred compromise will whack the wallet.

Sent from my SGP521 using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________
"Parce que je suis heureux en mer, et peut-Ítre pour sauver mon ame. . . "
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2015, 15:49   #52
Eternal Member

Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 848
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

Quote:
Originally Posted by TJ D View Post
Hello,

I happen to be one of the folks who have made the switch from heavy, traditional boats to a very light cruiser, and here are my thoughts.

First, the list of boats owned, with rough dry displacements

CT41-30,000 lbs
Tiburon (Cabo Rico) 36, 20,000 lbs
Steel Roberts 43 (40,000 lbs)
Carbon fiber custom 55 (24,000 lbs)

So, I guess I have been at both extremes now. I have sailed each of these boats offshore in the neighborhood of 10,000 miles, from about 52N to just below the equator, so a good cross section of conditions.

So, what do I think?

Light, Light, Light!!! It's really the only way to go. IF (big if) the boat is built to an acceptable standard. This is not always the case, and such boats can be a bit hard to find. If you're looking at relatively benign cruising, however, even the production models seem to do fine.
One problem with that line of thinking, is that lightness in a cruising boat is rarely as advantageous as the boat gets scaled down in size. As usual, the OP gives no indication of the size boat he's considering, or the budget he has available, but it's probably safe to presume his first boat is not going to be a 55-footer... Although, these days, you never know... ;-)

When considering boats at the smaller end of the spectrum for cruising, I think a reasonable amount of load-carrying ability becomes much more important... There's a certain amount of stuff we all need to carry aboard our boats no matter what size they may be, and most of it weighs the same no matter what boat it's tossed upon. Consider something like a Honda 2000 generator, which so many folks seem to consider a Must-Have these days ;-) It weighs the same whether it's put on your 55-footer, or my little 30-footer - but in real terms, it becomes considerably 'heavier' if brought aboard mine... When boats the size of mine are fitted out for more extended cruising, the additional weight of essentials like ground tackle, safety gear, ship's stores and provisions, crew gear and all the other crap most of us drag aboard represents a much higher percentage of the the boat's real world displacement than aboard a larger one like yours, which will likely remain far closer to sitting on her original lines, and retaining most of her light-ship performance...

As a result, whatever perceived advantage to light weight, and speed, begins to vanish once the smaller boat is laden with the requisite cruising stuff... If I were to try to load a boat like a J-30 with even half the stuff I carry aboard my heavier displacement of equivalent LOA, the sailing characteristics of the former would be completely destroyed, and to a dangerous extent, most likely...

If you're gonna reap whatever rewards there are to sailing a light, 'fast' boat in the smaller size ranges, you'd better be prepared to do your cruising in a very minimalist style, and be giving very careful consideration to the weight of everything that is gonna be brought along for the ride...
__________________
Jon Eisberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2015, 16:31   #53
Registered User
 
Panope's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Washington State
Boat: Colvin, Saugeen Witch (Aluminum), 34'
Posts: 1,593
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

Quote:
Originally Posted by wristwister View Post
When I trade up to a bigger cruising boat in a few years, a big consideration will be upwind sailing ability, especially the ability to sail herself off a lee shore. This seems like a basic safety requirement, and many heavy cruising boats can't do it.

We have a race up here in the PNW called "Race Your House", where the live aboards pry the dock off their homes and go for a sail. This usually involves an upwind start. I see some of those heavy cruisers tacking back and forth at the start line making no forward progress, and I wonder, what would they do if they were anchored near a lee shore, had engine trouble, and needed to get out of there?
They would throw out an extra thousand pounds of anchors and chain, and then proceed to fix their engine with the vast array of tools and spare parts stored down below.

Steve
Panope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2015, 20:59   #54
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Massachussetts
Boat: Cheoy Lee 47 CC
Posts: 700
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

I've had both and agree that build quality trumps the heavy vs light argument. By build quality I also include original design as part of that. A more performance oriented boat will require more attention sailing in heavy conditions and requires different tactics though. Depends on the capability and number of crew. I prefer moderate to slightly heavy performance cruisers these days though since I'm older and like a smoother ride with less effort. Depends on what your looking for, its quite personal and user specific.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________
lifeofreilly57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2015, 22:20   #55
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Bar Harbor, ME USA
Boat: West Wight Potter 19
Posts: 178
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

You can't recommend a boat to someone when you don't know their experience, what they are using it for, who is going to use it, where they are cruising, etc.
__________________
zedpassway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2015, 22:49   #56
Registered User
 
autumnbreeze27's Avatar

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Cruising Mexico
Boat: 50' Herreshoff Ketch
Posts: 967
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

My wife and I were on a 37' Bene on a mooring in Anegada. The wind was ripping 15-20 nonstop all day/night. The bene was rocking like a hobby horse. I looked over at a 50' or so ketch... they were barely moving.

We decided we'd rather be more comfortable then more maneuverable in marinas. Our ketch doesn't back down worth a damn, but she's fast and comfortable, especially with rocker stoppers out on the main and mizzen.

Like others said, it's a personal choice, try and sail on as many different boats as you can. Just remember not all light boats are created equal, neither are heavy full keel boats. We've got a clipper bow, which parts the seas beautifully, but it costs us storage in the bow. Everything boat is a compromise, you need to find what suits you.
__________________
autumnbreeze27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2015, 07:15   #57
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto area when not cruising
Boat: Bristol 45.5
Posts: 668
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

Quote:
Originally Posted by zedpassway View Post
You can't recommend a boat to someone when you don't know their experience, what they are using it for, who is going to use it, where they are cruising, etc.
I think that a lot of posters have used a lot of electrons to give their own personal preferences, generally that what they do in terms of boat choice makes most sense, rather than answer the question from the OP. I agree with the comment above entirely. To give a simple example, what did he mean by 'cruising'? Are we talking about a two week vacation to the other end of the lake or sailing around the world south of the capes? Also, what budget are we talking about? The choice you make with $10k is different than with a million.
__________________
Still looking for our next boat. Have decided we want to have something that will keep us happy for the next 10 years or so. By then I will be pushing 80 and if i am still sailing that will be a very good thing.
AiniA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2015, 17:41   #58
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: London, Ontario, Canada
Boat: In the market for one
Posts: 19
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

Thank you everyone for all the replies. I'm overwhelmed.

To answer a couple questions that have been asked...

1. By cruising I mean to be out for trips from a few hours to a couple of weeks.

2. While I would very much like to eventually do a trip through the Erie Canal and down to the Caribbean, 99% of my sailing will be done on either Lake Erie or Lake Huron. I'm leaning toward keeping the boat in Sarnia, Ontario as it offers easier access to the Manitoulin and Mackinaw areas which are lovely in the summer months. The closest marina to me on Lake Erie is Port Stanley and a few of you might be aware that for day sailing it is not that convenient due to a narrow river and waiting for the bridge to rise.

3. Budget. I'd like to keep it under $40,000 so it's a used boat to be sure. I'm no expert at all but from what I've been seeing, that budget should be more than adequate to get into a decent boat.

4. Size - I'm thinking between 30' - 35'.
__________________
Jaguar001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2015, 20:00   #59
Senior Cruiser

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2005
Boat: Outbound 44
Posts: 4,583
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaguar001 View Post
......
1. By cruising I mean to be out for trips from a few hours to a couple of weeks.
.....
Get a lighter boat that is fun to sail. Maybe one you can do some fun races in, so you really learn how to sail it. For your price range, there are lots of nice bots available that sail well.
__________________
Paul L
http://svjeorgia.blogspot.com
Paul L is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2015, 20:21   #60
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto area when not cruising
Boat: Bristol 45.5
Posts: 668
Re: Light or heavy boat for cruising

I think you want a lightish boat that sails well or you will be motoring way too much of the time. Check PHRF ratings for your area to get a (general sense) of performance. Your budget should work well in the size range you mention.
__________________

__________________
Still looking for our next boat. Have decided we want to have something that will keep us happy for the next 10 years or so. By then I will be pushing 80 and if i am still sailing that will be a very good thing.
AiniA is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cruising

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Heavy vs Light Displacement andreavanduyn Monohull Sailboats 120 29-06-2013 03:30
Light-to-Heavy Reefing Line Set-Up ? SvenG Seamanship & Boat Handling 16 23-04-2010 19:31
LED light turned Nav light BLUE!!! MarkJ Electrical: Batteries, Generators & Solar 19 28-01-2009 10:19
AIR How light is to light to sail in? Perithead Off Topic Forum 26 04-12-2007 18:52
Light vs Heavy boats bmanley General Sailing Forum 56 08-03-2007 17:05



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:34.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.