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Old 01-06-2007, 12:18   #1
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pirate Islander yatchs

Hello

I have really been looking at buying something that I can keep down in Mexico, until I can afford to call it quits and go sailing full time. I have found many different boats and options, so many that it has become confusing.

I have seen several Islander yatchs for sale at very reasonable prices, mid 30's to high 70's in the 38' to 42' range,most build in the mid 70's. I really like the look of them, I know this means not much if anything at all. I have searched the internet and have not been able to find much info on the Islander's other than the original company information and owner's forums (which did not have much information about the boats themselves).

I did see in one another thread on this site that they would make a decent blue water boat. I was wanting to know if any of you have one and what do you think about its performance, ie.. handling at sea, is it bluewater capable, headroom etc...

I would really hate to buy or attempt to buy a boat that will not be good at sea.
Thanks in advance for the advice.

Charley
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Old 01-06-2007, 13:20   #2
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Freeport 41

For a long while we were looking at the Freeport 41 and found it to be a lovely liveaboard. However, at sea it is repudated to be obnoxiously difficult to go to weather [most of your time sailing will be motoring] and the spacious cabins and galley set up only make for dangerous capability to be thrown for long distances before hitting something. As well in case of a need to rebuild your engine or remove it, you will find that it virtually impossible to remove in a complete state, you will need to take it apart piece by piece. They are a better boat than their price reflects or are given credit for, but do have their short comings. Everyone has an opinion... and some stink more than others. It will be interesting to hear what others have to say.
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Old 01-06-2007, 13:54   #3
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I own a far east mariner 40, very traditional full keeled clipper bow ketch. It is a solid safe boat, I wanted a traditional boat that I could afford. Not real fast to wind, but solid and steady, she tracks like she is on a rail. I would not buy a boat that I did not like the way it looks, I dont care how effiecient or fast. I guess what I am trying to say is there are many things to consider when purchasing a sailboat. But if your not looking at the boat all the way down the dock liked you looked at your first girfriend, its not the right boat. (how much grief an I going to get over that statement?)

Good luck on your search.
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Old 01-06-2007, 16:42   #4
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Thanks Guys,

After looking a little closer I have found that most of the Islander boats don't have much tankage. Under 100 gallons for fuel and water. Unless you go for one over 50'. Maybe they would be great livaboard, but I want to be able to get out in it to. for more than a day at a time.
I do know there are very few baots that have teh headroom that I require, I am 6'4" so these where on my list as they have enuff headroom. The search continues.
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Old 01-06-2007, 17:04   #5
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Aloha Charley,
Islanders are good well made boats. In my experience you don't need too much fuel unless you want to motor great distances and watermakers are the thing to have now days for water tankage. I went from Hawaii to the Puget Sound on 40 gals fuel. (Just to charge batteries and motor in the Straits)
I don't think tankage is near that important as it was, say, 20 years ago.
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Old 01-06-2007, 17:46   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charley
Hello

I have really been looking at buying something that I can keep down in Mexico, until I can afford to call it quits and go sailing full time.

I have seen several Islander yatchs for sale at very reasonable prices, mid 30's to high 70's in the 38' to 42' range,most build in the mid 70's.

I did see in one another thread on this site that they would make a decent blue water boat.

I would really hate to buy or attempt to buy a boat that will not be good at sea.

Charley
Yo Charley,

The Islanders were not considered to be bluewater boats, with the possible exception of the Tradewinds 55, and the Freeport 41. The others were designed and built as an entry-level racer-cruiser, and to try and convert one would be a monumental task. For no good reason.

I see how you can find many of them attractive, and I have done a lot of sailing and working on a 36 to appreciate them for what they are. However you must look at a completely different class if you truly need a bluewater boat.

best, andy
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Old 01-06-2007, 18:01   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terra Nova
Yo Charley,

The Islanders were not considered to be bluewater boats, with the possible exception of the Tradewinds 55, and the Freeport 41. The others were designed and built as an entry-level racer-cruiser, and to try and convert one would be a monumental task. For no good reason.

I see how you can find many of them attractive, and I have done a lot of sailing and working on a 36 to appreciate them for what they are. However you must look at a completely different class if you truly need a bluewater boat.

best, andy
I was looking at a Islander Freeport 36. It certainly looks like a bluewater boat. You definately could NOT call it a racer unless you had last place in mind. The tankage was 50 fuel and 100 water, sounds like plenty for a 36' boat. Just my 2 cents.
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Old 01-06-2007, 20:08   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reel Deep
I was looking at a Islander Freeport 36. It certainly looks like a bluewater boat. You definately could NOT call it a racer unless you had last place in mind. The tankage was 50 fuel and 100 water, sounds like plenty for a 36' boat. Just my 2 cents.
Yo Reel,

I am also familiar with the Freeport 36--a nice looking boat. But not one I would ever consider a bluewater boat. There are many reasons for this conclusion. One of these is the immense cockpit which empties directly into the salon, with no bridge deck or sill. Another is the enormous side windows. Although any one of these things could possibly be worked around, there are many better choices.

50 gallons of fuel is also a handicap for a boat this size, don't you think? But the 100 gallons of water could work with a watermaker or collection system.

best, andy
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Old 02-06-2007, 03:21   #9
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Id reassert Andys comments.

The following is from the Islander 36 Newsletter, October 1997, researched by Skipper Wall. Additional information provided by Ralph Brown, previous owner of Islander Yacht Corp:
Islander 36:
Alan Gurney NA designed the hull and rig.
Joe Artese designed from the sheerline up and the interior.
There are approximately 120 on the SFO bay and delta area. There were approximately 720 built. One of the most successful runs of a production boat. Hull #13 is still on the SFO bay owned by a member of the Golden Gate Yacht Club. Molds were sold to Newport Offshore yachts. Mold location unknown. The San Francisco I36 association is now 23 years old. Races one-design and cruises to many locations in and around the bay area including the near coastal waters. Cost: 1975 at $29,932, 1978 at $47,400. Years of production were 1971 thru 1986 with a gap of three years from 1980 to 1983.

Goto: http://www.islandersailboats.com/Des...ndex=0&tabid=1
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Old 02-06-2007, 08:36   #10
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The I36 made my short list of boats to buy. They can be had pretty cheaply and are solid enough to cruise Mexico as long as some reenforcements are made to the bulkhead tabbing. Also look for a lead keel model. Check the keelbolts carefully. Its not a boat that I would consider for a circumnavigation but they have been raced on SF Bay for over 30 years and many have made the trip to Mexico and back from SF. They sail well on all points of sail. I would seriously look at them. The further South you get the cheaper they are.
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Old 02-06-2007, 09:47   #11
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15 year round the world

Dick and Sandy Shirley (of SF CA) sailed their Islander 36 "Geja" most the way around the world and stopped in Spain where they sold it to a new younger couple who are now refitting it for another trip 'round. So it can be done. But I wouldn't do it. Not my style 'a boat.
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Old 02-06-2007, 11:51   #12
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We have friends with an Islander 36 who cruised Mexico with us for several years. (We sailed a Lord Nelson 35.) They motored a lot, especially to weather.

Steve B.
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Old 24-10-2007, 13:31   #13
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If the larger Islanders are anything like the smaller ones (the designs seem to be very similar) - I would definitely consider it. I bought an old islander 24 in order to help my family build some sailing skills for our planned departure from 'land life' next year - and have gotten much more then I bargained for! What we planned to use as a simple day sailer we quickly found to be an amazingly capable pocket cruiser! We have already been in situations that would have been pretty nerve wracking on some of the other small (but larger then this!) boats that I owned - and these experiences have been nothing short of wonderful!

Anyway - I really can't offer any credible information here - guess I just saw this as an opportunity to let everyone know that I love my Islander

Good Luck!
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Old 24-10-2007, 14:56   #14
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Islander Freeport 36

The Islander Freeport 36 would be a good choice for a Mexico boat. Some where made with vynlester so should not show any signs of blisters. They can be had in good condition on the west coast for 50-65K depending on condition and equipment aboard. The Islander 36 is a great boat, I consider it to be a coastal cruiser however. Watch out for the cast iron keels built between 74-76. The Freeport 41 has been mentioned earlier, I agree.
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Old 24-10-2007, 16:03   #15
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Ssshhhh....

Don't tell all of the people who have, or who are currently, sailing across oceans on sailboats "designed and built" for coastal cruising that their boats are not capable of crossing oceans.
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