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Old 10-03-2014, 12:43   #31
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

If you take a step (or three) back you will find that you can get a GREAT 10 year old boat for what you need for cruising the islands for a lot less if you stop shopping names and get a standard production model. All those names are really doing is costing you a lot of money so that you can some snob appeal (they are nice but don't get all delusional about the real reasons).
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Old 10-03-2014, 12:56   #32
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

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Originally Posted by Kevin84 View Post
How much space do you think you need? If you're single handing, I wouldn't look at anything over 30-35'. I think you'll be surprised how little space you actually need on board. Especially since in the tropics you'll most likely be spending 75-90% of your time on deck anyway.

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This is a very good point. It also means a heck of a lot less cost for maintenance and equipment and less for mooring and dock fees.
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Old 10-03-2014, 13:02   #33
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

I've been sailing for nearly 50 years and don't know anyone that ever bought a new boat except maybe a new dinghy.
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Old 10-03-2014, 13:13   #34
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

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I've been sailing for nearly 50 years and don't know anyone that ever bought a new boat except maybe a new dinghy.
Maybe they are waiting for you. I think it's time
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Old 10-03-2014, 13:24   #35
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

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How much space do you think you need? If you're single handing, I wouldn't look at anything over 30-35'. I think you'll be surprised how little space you actually need on board. Especially since in the tropics you'll most likely be spending 75-90% of your time on deck anyway.

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BTW, I just reread this, I apologize in that it sounds rather snippy. Did not mean it that way. But it is something you should seriously consider. If your planned cruising area is primarily the East Coast and the Caribbean, you really don't need a boat that can cross the Atlantic in the middle of winter. A boat like a Catalina 30 (which is HUGE down below) or a similarly sized BeneHuntaLina would work perfectly for you. Not only will your maintenance be far cheaper, you can use smaller sized gear. Which quickly adds up to BIG savings. Smaller winches, smaller anchor, smaller sails smaller fenders and dock lines, smaller standing rigging. It adds up to THOUSANDS saved. Not to mention docking is cheaper, haul outs are cheaper, bottom cleaning and painting is cheaper. Annual maintenance savings alone will put another 5-10k into your cruising kitty each year. Add in the fact the the larger the boat the harder it is to single hand it, and I think you'd get far more enjoyment out of a smaller boat than insisting on a 40+ footer.

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Old 10-03-2014, 13:42   #36
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

There is one scenerio where a smaller boat will work. And I do like the idea of a 30' to 35' boat. That is if the wife decides to stay on land. Or we only cruise in winter months and spend summers on land.

This scenerio, although far from perfect, would allow some months on the water and that would be a start.





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Old 10-03-2014, 13:48   #37
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

So what are your parameters and your location? I'll help search for some boats.
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Old 10-03-2014, 13:48   #38
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

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There is one scenerio where a smaller boat will work. And I do like the idea of a 30' to 35' boat. That is if the wife decides to stay on land. Or we only cruise in winter months and spend summers on land.

This scenerio, although far from perfect, would allow some months on the water and that would be a start.





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Ok then. Why not check out a boat like a Catalina 36 or similar? I think you'll be surprised by the amount of room below decks. Dont just look at an arbitrary number like boat length. Go onboard a number of different sized boats.

On question though. From your last comment, it sounds like your wife isn't exactly thrilled with the idea of cruising. Is that the case?

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Old 10-03-2014, 14:25   #39
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

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I did say I was retired and wanted to cruise. I meant to say 'cruise full-time'. I need a 'bluewater' ready boat. Island Packet was recommended. Wow - those are very expensive and 75k buys a 1980's 35 year old boat. I also need more room than what is on a 37' boat so by the time I look at new 42' to 45' boats they are around 500k.
You absolutely do not need a 42'-45' boat. A 34'-37' will work fine. Change your priorities and life-style. You can easily find a 35' quality boat, turn-key for around $50K.
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Old 10-03-2014, 15:09   #40
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

I like Sailorboy's comment at the top of this page where he suggests shopping for the individual ten year old boat and not the manufacturer's name. Once a boat is ten years old or older much of it's value has been determined by how it has been cared for. Also, I agree with those that suggest something around 35' can suit your needs. My wife and I are cruising on our 41', but that's only because we had two teenagers grow up and move away. If I were starting now as a couple, I would likely be looking for a ten to twenty year old cutter. I'd have a list of criteria that I would not compromise, but I would not limit my search by a manufacturer. For me, I'd want a fiberglass hull, diesel propulsion, fuel tanks that are not corroding steel or those that are replacable. I'd be leary of a boat that was built around all it's major components so that they can not be replaced. I would not fear some dirt or even a few cosmetic soft spots in the deck coring. I might accept some need for a sail replacement or some shrouds, even a bit of easy wiring, but not a combination of all these things. I've seen a few good buys that are pristine except for one big problem. It's not unusual to find a boat in great condition all around, but the engine is blown. Such a boat can sell for a price that is far lower on the market than the cost of replacing the engine. I would walk away from imbedded chain plates that are weeping rust or a bolted on keel that is weeping, a corroding mast step, a screwed on teak deck, wood rot in the cabin structure, a damaged hull/deck joint or a misaligned shape in the hull or deck.

There's another factor too. Some people like to maintain their boats and they can do much themselves. You need to evaluate your capabilities and how much you expect to be willing to learn and attempt. I have a friend who needed my help in putting his new license plate on his car. He's a brilliant statistician, but he can't operate a screwdriver well. Know your limits!
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Old 10-03-2014, 15:16   #41
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

And know how much time you want to spend tweaking the crap out of an old boat before you splash and depart.

Time is also money
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Old 10-03-2014, 15:30   #42
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

Forget about size as being the length of the boat! Start thinking of size as SPACE being supplied as it meets your needs. A lot of "larger" boats don't have much more useable space as far as a couple living on a boat. They just have more guest room and end up with less space for the owners. I've seen 50' boats that I would never consider compared to some 40' boats, and most 45' boats from the 80s suck space compared to lots of modern 36' boats.

Nothing beats space on a boat! My current boat is 41' on deck (43' overall but those 2 extra feet are stern lockers and nothing goes in there that I would want to get to regularly), and compared to my last boat which was 39' the space is HUGE! The amount of living comfort difference is hard to believe and I would never go back.

And nothing provides space more than a modern production boat!

Get the boat that has the SPACE you want and be happy much more often than you be happy thinking of how yachty your boat is.

But if you want an older boat that should have a lot larger following for a great islands couple boat, get one of the Morgan 41 Out Island models (get a "classic" which is the Catalina updated version) and then use the savings to have a more fun in your cruising.

Remember what you want to use use your boat for. Is it to sail all the time and all conditions, or is it to cruise where you pick your weather windows and seasons to move to various places to live on your boat?

BTW - regardless of boat name, if you look at an older boat that has been cared for and used and it is in good condition, that is a good boat period!
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Old 10-03-2014, 15:41   #43
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

It is correct that the wife is luke cool to the idea. But she has very bad land allergies that being on the water might solve.

But bottom line, I want to do this. I might sail down to, say St. Thomas and she might fly down and spend time on the boat but not sail long legs of a trip, she would fly.

So living space is better than sailing speed? I kinda like the Hunter 356.

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Old 10-03-2014, 15:45   #44
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

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And know how much time you want to spend tweaking the crap out of an old boat before you splash and depart.

Time is also money
This is an important decision that a buyer of an old boat has complete control over. There are used boats that are ready to leave the dock as soon as you can load your gear and provisions and those that may take a year. Since the phrase used above, "Time is also money" is wise and true; the purchase of an older boat allows you this control. If you decide to save 10K on a purchase that takes you 10 months of your own DIY work, only you can judge the value. This is why the survey and the knowledge of skills is so important. After the survey, you can bargain your deal and judge the value of your time and work.

Your 75K can allow you a great used boat that can get you on the water in little time by your choice and skill. SaltyMonkey has posted earlier that you can buy a new boat for 100K to 150K that is a "clean slate". This may be a wise plan for some. It kind of reminds me of my statistician friend who has trouble with a screwdriver. He buys a new car every two years so that he feels secure with the reliability of his car on the highway. Back when I owned cars, I would get the most for my money buying at 50,000 miles an the odometer and running it up to 200,000.

Time is money. Knowing your skills is money. Buying a survey to help you recognizing the condition of an older boat can be huge money!
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Old 10-03-2014, 16:40   #45
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Re: I Just Fell Off the Turnip Wagon

Well lets see

< 10 years old
fully loaded
low engine miles
sound everything
adequate elect.
turn key
dink
raft
35-38 ft
US based

< 50k

Ready to go. NOW!

You know, after listening to people talk on this thread, I think they should probably upgrade their holding tanks.
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