Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 25-03-2014, 07:36   #31
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Massachussetts
Boat: Cheoy Lee 47 CC
Posts: 700
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jbingham View Post
We are now the proud owners of a beautiful 53' little harbor!!! Thanks for all the wonderful input everyone!! Time to start a new thread!
Congratulations, hope she's all you wanted, please let everyone know how you get on with the boat and what upgrades you decide to do. It's always interesting to hear how people personalize their own boats.
Good Luck.
__________________

__________________
lifeofreilly57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 07:54   #32
Registered User
 
typhoon's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Toronto Canada
Boat: Bristol 45.5
Posts: 945
Images: 1
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

We have a Ted Hood designed boat a Bristol 45.5 and love it, never looked back and I would buy another in a heartbeat.

You are going to love her, Good luck, keep us updated.

Regards
__________________

__________________
typhoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 09:40   #33
mrm
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Poland, EU
Boat: crew on Bavaria 38 Cruiser
Posts: 651
Question Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by deluxe68 View Post
[...]The PSC 37 would work [..]. The deck-stepped mast design in this boat has been used for decades without any problems that I know of.
At a risk of a thread drift... I am frequently wondering why there are so many sailors insisting on a keel-stepped mast. I mean, when a mast is deck-stepped, there is a compression post directly underneath, which transfers all vertical forces to the keel anyway, so forces acting on hull seem to be the same in both cases. What am I missing here? What benefits of a keel-stepped mast outweigh the additional maintenance of a deck seal boot and wet bilges, plus an added cost of several feet of mast length?
__________________
mrm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 11:05   #34
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Newport, RI
Boat: Little Harbor 53'
Posts: 161
Images: 4
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by typhoon View Post
We have a Ted Hood designed boat a Bristol 45.5 and love it, never looked back and I would buy another in a heartbeat.

You are going to love her, Good luck, keep us updated.

Regards

I look at 2 of huge Bristol 45.5s. Gorgeous boats!! Survey on the hard happens this week! Then we dunk her in for sea trial as soon as they can get her out of the warehouse and commissioned. Likely late next week!!
__________________
Jbingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 11:09   #35
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Newport, RI
Boat: Little Harbor 53'
Posts: 161
Images: 4
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrm View Post
At a risk of a thread drift... I am frequently wondering why there are so many sailors insisting on a keel-stepped mast. I mean, when a mast is deck-stepped, there is a compression post directly underneath, which transfers all vertical forces to the keel anyway, so forces acting on hull seem to be the same in both cases. What am I missing here? What benefits of a keel-stepped mast outweigh the additional maintenance of a deck seal boot and wet bilges, plus an added cost of several feet of mast length?


Y might be able to resurrect this post that ponders your very same question or just find the answers already contained in the posts to date.


What is the Advantage of a Keel Stepped Mast?
__________________
Jbingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 11:49   #36
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,737
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CR38 View Post
The larger the boat the more true this statement. It is actually relatively easy to buy amazing boats in the 30'-38' range at great prices.
Indeed. There is no buyer's market for really good boats, especially really good and expensive ones, especially larger ones.

Hylas 49 is a pretty good and pretty expensive boat, so I would not expect there is any hope of "stealing" one.
__________________
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 11:51   #37
mrm
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Poland, EU
Boat: crew on Bavaria 38 Cruiser
Posts: 651
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jbingham View Post
Y might be able to resurrect this post that ponders your very same question or just find the answers already contained in the posts to date.


What is the Advantage of a Keel Stepped Mast?
Thank you, somehow I missed that thread.
__________________
mrm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 12:10   #38
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Newport, RI
Boat: Little Harbor 53'
Posts: 161
Images: 4
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
Indeed. There is no buyer's market for really good boats, especially really good and expensive ones, especially larger ones.

Hylas 49 is a pretty good and pretty expensive boat, so I would not expect there is any hope of "stealing" one.

Totally disagree. You just need to be patient. I bought my J100 last year and sold it in October for 1k more than I paid. My seller was at the end of his cycle. The original J100 I offered on is still for sale 25k more than I paid and in less pristine condition.

The little harbor we just bought was also discounted in our favor. You have to do your homework. And I don't mean combing yachtworld. If you zero in on a boat, understand the sellers situation, some will work and some will not.

We start with a fixed not to exceed number and are prepared to walk. Another key point is a buying broker for us. The crew in Portsmouth RI we have used several times now knows the market, the price points and situations.

I can tell you this, no one pays list. Or at least no one typing this post right now....
__________________
Jbingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 12:46   #39
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 19,737
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jbingham View Post
Totally disagree. You just need to be patient. I bought my J100 last year and sold it in October for 1k more than I paid. My seller was at the end of his cycle. The original J100 I offered on is still for sale 25k more than I paid and in less pristine condition.

The little harbor we just bought was also discounted in our favor. You have to do your homework. And I don't mean combing yachtworld. If you zero in on a boat, understand the sellers situation, some will work and some will not.

We start with a fixed not to exceed number and are prepared to walk. Another key point is a buying broker for us. The crew in Portsmouth RI we have used several times now knows the market, the price points and situations.

I can tell you this, no one pays list. Or at least no one typing this post right now....
It depends of course on what market you are in and what boat and the specific situation of the seller.

However, I think that most people in the market would agree that larger, non-production, newer boats, say, boats not needing much work and costing more than half a million dollars, are nearly impossible to buy at a bargain price. Try to buy a 5 to 8 year old Oyster, for example, as I did, and you may be in for a rude surprise. I was in the market with cash in 2009 soon after the crisis, hoping very much for a bargain in what should have been a buyer's market for just about any kind of asset. But it was not to be had. The better examples were being sold for above the asking price, and the more shopworn examples with many defects could not be bought for much less than the asking price. Which I judged too high, which is why I never bought an Oyster.

It's also not right to talk about "list price" -- there is no such thing with used boats. Different sellers price their boats differently. Sometimes too high, sometimes ridiculously so, sometimes reasonably. You can't just say you'll only pay x% less than the asking price -- what if the asking price is 50% too high? Or 10% too low? And sometimes the price is negotiable, and sometimes it really is not. Sometimes the sellers need to sell and are more flexible, sometimes they are willing to wait to get their price. With expensive boats, the sellers are often willing and able to wait. I even tried to buy an Oyster from an estate, which you would think would be the most flexible kind of seller, since there is no emotional attachment to the boat and no fixed idea about its worth other than what the brokers say. Didn't work; with great difficulty I negotiated the price down by the symbolic amount of about 10,000 pounds (for a half million dollar plus boat), then got a horror movie back from the survey, and had to walk.

I spent a couple of months trying to negotiate the price on the Moody I finally bought. No way; firm price. I confess that I was negotiating on principle -- the asking price was actually more than fair, as I knew from the beginning. The boat was seven years old and in wonderful condition, and was priced lower than boats in much worse condition. I eventually paid that price, and just in the nick of time, too, as another buyer appeared with a full price offer almost the same day I signed the contract (the other buyer was someone I got acquainted with, coincidentally, later, and he was very sorry he didn't move faster). The boat was on the market for less than two months total.

And all this took place in 2009, when the economy was much worse than it is now.

These experiences are quite typical in this market segment, where buyers generally outnumber sellers. Boats under 50 feet, production boats, or any boats more than 10 years old, especially boats more than 20 years old, are a very different market, where different rules apply.
__________________
Dockhead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25-03-2014, 12:57   #40
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Newport, RI
Boat: Little Harbor 53'
Posts: 161
Images: 4
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dockhead View Post
It depends of course on what market you are in and what boat and the specific situation of the seller.

However, I think that most people in the market would agree that larger, non-production, newer boats, say, boats not needing much work and costing more than half a million dollars, are nearly impossible to buy at a bargain price. Try to buy a 5 to 8 year old Oyster, for example, as I did, and you may be in for a rude surprise. I was in the market with cash in 2009 soon after the crisis, hoping very much for a bargain in what should have been a buyer's market for just about any kind of asset. But it was not to be had. The better examples were being sold for above the asking price, and the more shopworn examples with many defects could not be bought for much less than the asking price. Which I judged too high, which is why I never bought an Oyster.

It's also not right to talk about "list price" -- there is no such thing with used boats. Different sellers price their boats differently. Sometimes too high, sometimes ridiculously so, sometimes reasonably. You can't just say you'll only pay x% less than the asking price -- what if the asking price is 50% too high? Or 10% too low? And sometimes the price is negotiable, and sometimes it really is not. Sometimes the sellers need to sell and are more flexible, sometimes they are willing to wait to get their price. With expensive boats, the sellers are often willing and able to wait. I even tried to buy an Oyster from an estate, which you would think would be the most flexible kind of seller, since there is no emotional attachment to the boat and no fixed idea about its worth other than what the brokers say. Didn't work; with great difficulty I negotiated the price down by the symbolic amount of about 10,000 pounds (for a half million dollar plus boat), then got a horror movie back from the survey, and had to walk.

I spent a couple of months trying to negotiate the price on the Moody I finally bought. No way; firm price. I confess that I was negotiating on principle -- the asking price was actually more than fair, as I knew from the beginning. The boat was seven years old and in wonderful condition, and was priced lower than boats in much worse condition. I eventually paid that price, and just in the nick of time, too, as another buyer appeared with a full price offer almost the same day I signed the contract (the other buyer was someone I got acquainted with, coincidentally, later, and he was very sorry he didn't move faster). The boat was on the market for less than two months total.

And all this took place in 2009, when the economy was much worse than it is now.

These experiences are quite typical in this market segment, where buyers generally outnumber sellers. Boats under 50 feet, production boats, or any boats more than 10 years old, especially boats more than 20 years old, are a very different market, where different rules apply.

Like I said. Some people can sit on a boat 3-4 years to get their price. Brokers help. If folks don't need to sell in the 500k plus range they won't. For years. But every seller has a cycle. It's up to you to find the right boat AND the right seller. Then it's the right boat. At least for me.
__________________
Jbingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 31-03-2014, 17:57   #41
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Newport, RI
Boat: Little Harbor 53'
Posts: 161
Images: 4
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Day 1 of survey complete. Minor maintenance items so far. No major gotchas. Friday we finish off the inspection on the hard, get our concerns addressed then commission for sea trial.
__________________
Jbingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2014, 20:38   #42
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Newport, RI
Boat: Little Harbor 53'
Posts: 161
Images: 4
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByCruisers Sailing Forum1397183888.359418.jpg
Views:	203
Size:	216.1 KB
ID:	79129

Prepare to splash
__________________
Jbingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2014, 07:09   #43
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Home port is San Diego, California but currently cruising the East Coast of the USA.
Boat: Contest 48
Posts: 636
Images: 1
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

That is a gorgeous boats. Congratulations. May you always find fair winds and calm seas.
__________________
nhschneider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2014, 07:17   #44
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Newport, RI
Boat: Little Harbor 53'
Posts: 161
Images: 4
Re: Hylas 49 - Any owners or folks that have first hand knowledge out there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by nhschneider View Post
That is a gorgeous boats. Congratulations. May you always find fair winds and calm seas.

Thank you sir!!! A dream come true for us. If you're ever in New England and see us floating about we'll meet you at the hook for a dark and stormy!
__________________

__________________
Jbingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
Hylas

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 13:28.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.