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Old 17-10-2010, 13:55   #16
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Mark
Interesting terminology.
One reason you have bolt cutters on the foredeck is that your rig has disappeared over the side.
Larry
Thats standing rigging.
I thought you said running rigging.

Anyway, doesnt matter, Sheets in props shouldnt happen. Its the crews fault when it happens.

I'll check out of the thread.


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Old 17-10-2010, 15:41   #17
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here's the answer: NO. you can't cross the Pacific in a Hunter. Or a Beneteau. Or a Catalina. Or a Juneau. Or a Bavaria. Or a Hanse. Their keels fall off, their rudders break, they tend to bend in a seaway. The fact that only an idiot would purchase such a boat is evidenced in the fact that so many of them are sold to people who obviously know no better.

Please don't allow the fact that such boats routinely cross the Pacific, not to mention other oceans, confuse the facts. And fact number one is this: when it comes to cruising, nothing is more important than brand.

That goes double for catamarans.
...and triple for catamarans I suppose?

How come this isn't a sticky?
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Old 17-10-2010, 21:31   #18
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thanks everyone for the opinions
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Old 17-10-2010, 21:50   #19
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Sorry trevordean,
it seems we ran away with that one! I hope you can still pick out some answers from the posts that were given. I certainly enjoyed it!
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Old 17-10-2010, 23:42   #20
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bolt cutters

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Originally Posted by Larry View Post
Mark
Interesting terminology.
One reason you have bolt cutters on the foredeck is that your rig has disappeared over the side. Perhaps it was too light for conditions as in hunter production boats offshore. Weather is not something that one cannot control when covering large distances. Rigs often have lines attached and while I myself try to sail as much as possible it is not at all unusual to motor with sails up. I am surprised you don't?
I always have wondered about this. I see a bunches of gente talking about bolt cutters aboard. Firstly, my foredeck is a rather wet place, and based on the condition of the garden shears I left out in the rain, I can't imagine that bolt cutters would last a month up there. And I have no idea where I'd put them.

Secondly, I use bolt cutters rather frequently in my work, often under what are "emergency conditions." We carry a set of 18" and 36" cutters, and the 18" are worthless. It takes the 36" to cut anything of substance, and that's a big set of scissors to lug around a boat. While I've never had to cut away my sailing rig, I have had to cut a non stationary item where another life depended on my performance. It was a real bear, and that was on dry land, sans rolling. Two glances at my standing rigging tells me that it would be a tough cut, times four. I have a small boat.

We recently went and looked at a 45 footer, and there is *no way* anyone less than Lou Ferrigno is cutting that standing rigging with bolt cutters. Not in a timely manner.

Not to thread jack, but how would one jettison the rig in the real world? Pop the clevis pins? As I think about it more, it might be more reasonable to attack the shaft of the turnbuckle rods rather than the running rigging? Is that what the bolt cutters are for?

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Old 19-10-2010, 17:49   #21
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You could always just bring a stihl saw on board. Now you have options such as a new hatch.
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Old 19-10-2010, 17:50   #22
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Thanks yes i did get some useful info outa this.
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Old 19-10-2010, 18:24   #23
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I met four Dutch guys back in '05'... about 400 miles West of Land's End who were rowing from New York to Rotterdam.... they'd crossed faster than I had in my Hunter37...
As a matter of fact they overtook me again 18hrs later as I wallowed in the calms... lasted four bloody days...
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Old 19-10-2010, 18:34   #24
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oh im going to post here then to create a new one.

I have been told that a Morgan is a good boat if i wanted to get one.... my ideal boat is one that would cross oceans. thus i am new on sailing and has never sailed, but i know how i am when i get a vehicle that lets me travel far and wide. i know my self. so do most recommend a morgan? my first boat honestly would be $10,000 tops... any idea, advice or opinions? thanks
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Old 19-10-2010, 20:08   #25
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wow. we almost went a week before yet another person who had just joined the forum asked about whether a given brand of production boat would be reliable.

here's the answer: NO. you can't cross the Pacific in a Hunter. Or a Beneteau. Or a Catalina. Or a Juneau. Or a Bavaria. Or a Hanse. Their keels fall off, their rudders break, they tend to bend in a seaway. The fact that only an idiot would purchase such a boat is evidenced in the fact that so many of them are sold to people who obviously know no better.

Please don't allow the fact that such boats routinely cross the Pacific, not to mention other oceans, confuse the facts. And fact number one is this: when it comes to cruising, nothing is more important than brand.

That goes double for catamarans.
FACT: hunters dissolve in water. This way people have to keep replacing them...like razer blades.
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Old 19-10-2010, 20:08   #26
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Ironic because i was just looking at them a minute ago and was eventually going to put that into a list of boats and ask about them all. To add to atomicphil is a morgan 384 approperiate for ocean corssings?
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Old 19-10-2010, 20:37   #27
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Ironic because i was just looking at them a minute ago and was eventually going to put that into a list of boats and ask about them all. To add to atomicphil is a morgan 384 approperiate for ocean corssings?

Try sailing on several different designs of boats, see what you like, see what moves the way you like..................hunter, beneteau, catalina..........all will hang together longer than you will (with few exceptions). If you have sailed on a westsail,hunter,island packet, you'll have the tools you need to make your desicion.

opc orn:
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Old 19-10-2010, 21:21   #28
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Sailboats are generally designed to outlast their captains and crews. They're tough, and while they don't enjoy rolling with the sails up, they can usually survive the process without suffering catastrophic damage.

The part of this that nobody really thinks of when they ask the question: "Is xxxxxxxx designed boat suitable for ocean passages?" is that the biggest variable in boat performance is the captain. The boat is designed to go way past your quitting point, but the trick is to never let it get that far. If your boat is light and fast, then you have to plan your trip to include running from weather systems, rather than through them. If your boat's a crusher like mine, or one of those ferro-cement types, then you're more likely to go looking for the wind so you can plow through it, rather than running from it.

In all things safety-related for sailing, the captain is at least 2/3s of the entire equation. The boat is what it is, and will perform as it's designed. It's the captain's job to keep it out of situations that are unsuitable for it. And that, unfortunately, is the hardest part to gauge.
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Old 19-10-2010, 21:49   #29
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You are absolutely correct.
Cheers
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Old 19-10-2010, 21:57   #30
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I have sailed the morgan 38 it is a great boat and quite sturdy. The five foot draft is particularly good around south Florida and the Bahamas. For the price I don't think you can beat it. People that have owned morgans are quite loyal to them. It is sturdy and well designed by Ted Brewer. Thick rudder stock and prop shaft. Big chain plates.
The 384 is probably the best as it has the larger hurth transmission and the bigger rudder. Can't beat the perkins 4-108.
Intend use is everything but if you not sure what to buy you will not go too far wrong with a morgan 38 provided you buy well.
Cheers
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