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Old 12-07-2010, 00:13   #31
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This is yet another reason why a steel hull makes a lot of sense. Regards, Richard.
Because you won't be going all that fast when you hit stuff?
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Old 12-07-2010, 02:37   #32
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Hitting an object while motoring or sailing

Hello sailor, since we are still on this subject, how about installing a short sighted camera or a cctv will it help?
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Old 12-07-2010, 03:25   #33
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If you can't see it - how does the camera?
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Old 12-07-2010, 08:58   #34
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One can spend a very large amount of money to see objects in the dark: Thermal Imaging - Night Vision - Pleasure Craft - Yachts
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Old 12-07-2010, 10:17   #35
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One can spend a very large amount of money to see objects in the dark: Thermal Imaging - Night Vision - Pleasure Craft - Yachts
And STILL not see items that are mostly submerged and have the same thermal signature as their surroundings. Dead heads, containers, rope, netting, in fact most things floating in the water with a low profile, just disappear into the clutter. The only thing I've found my night vision camera is really useful for, is spotting small wooden fishing boats not displaying lights. Thankfully I didn't buy the gear, it was on the boat when ownership changed hands.

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Old 13-07-2010, 05:06   #36
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I have forward scanning sonar, an Interphase SE200C. It's better than nothing, but it won't pick up very shallow floating logs, lobster pots or fishing net bouys. Sailing at night, or in nasty weather isn't for the faint of heart. We are all taking our chances.

What will it pick up? Do you think your purchase was worth it? If so, what justifies it? Will it help spot a shifting channel or shoal? (I like the idea of it, but where we sail most of the bottom hazards are well charted granite reefs, and the floating stuff (including lobster pots) is the major worry in low visibility.
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Old 13-07-2010, 07:29   #37
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My Interphase will pick up a big log that is submerged. It will also pick up schools of fish. It will definitely spot a shoal and will probably spot a container floating just below the surface (although I have never encountered one).

It will not pick up lobster pot or fishing buoys, because it can't "see" above the surface of the water.

A lobster pot line tangled around your prop is a PITA, but it is usually not a life or death matter. A reef or a container could be.
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Old 01-03-2016, 16:00   #38
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Thumbs up Re: Hitting an Object While Motoring

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Originally Posted by btrayfors View Post
Funny, only one post came close to answering the OP's reasonable question with a workable response.

Hitting things in the water is de rigour on the Potomac, especially after heavy rains. We have tons of "Potomac alligators"....everything from tree branches to telephone poles, picnic tables, tires with rims (floating vertically or horizontally), and all manner of jetsom....simply not avoidable if you travel at night which I often do.

One technique which works very well if you're traveling at a reasonable speed, say under 10 knots or so: The instant you hear a bump on the bow or hull, simultaneously pull the throttle all the way back and a split second later pull the gear into neutral. Not reverse. Your boat speed will carry you past the point of impact and the object...whatever it might be...will bounce along the bottom of your hull and will pass harmlessly behind you. Don't put the engine back into gear until you see the culprit floating in your wake.

Bill
Excelent technique. Specially with folding propellers as they may get folded and have the blades protected.
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Old 02-03-2016, 20:12   #39
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Re: Hitting an Object While Motoring

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There's lots of crap in the water around Asia. If you sail at night, you will hit things. You will even hit things during the day - I know I do.

There's really not a lot you can do about it. I've tried using night vision, but it's really just a placebo - you can't spend the whole night looking through them.

Turning off the engine quickly and whacking it into reverse (if you have a feathering prop) when you hit may restrict damage - it certainly helps with the nets

Other than that, it's really the ability of the boat to deal with the clunks.

Hitting stuff is just part of sailing in Asia i'm afraid.
I think this is sound advice. There are many floating logs and loads of other junk in SE Asian waters. If you must sail/motor at night, slowing down would at least increase the chances of minimizing damage. Having a prop that's protected by a skeg helps greatly with hard objects and sometimes with nets and ropes.

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