Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 15-09-2016, 20:28   #31
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cayuga Lake NY - or on the boat somewhere south of there
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,021
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Now that I am thinking about it I remember that there WAS an extra fuel tank installed under the sole. I am not sure what was there before but there is no doubt it can be done. And as for water, you could always install a water maker.
__________________

__________________
sck5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-09-2016, 20:33   #32
Registered User

Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Earth
Boat: Amel Super Maramu 53 ft
Posts: 428
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Hello John,

Welcome!! Good to see you here; I've followed your blog for some time...

My opinion.... a B40 is like having Marilyn Monroe as a spouse. Beautiful but impractical. More bluntly.... "long distance cruising? Not fit for purpose as they say in the UK.

BUT, ultimately, it is your choice. Enjoy the hunt!
__________________

__________________
Eleuthera 2014 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-09-2016, 20:36   #33
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Cayuga Lake NY - or on the boat somewhere south of there
Boat: Caliber 40
Posts: 1,021
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

just read what carlf said about the centerboard. Yes, it is a beast to crank it up and down. I know because I was the one who did it, trying to be a good guest, etc. My cousin said 132 revolutions from full up to full down. That would get old fast. But they do sell electric drills that you can put a winch bit on if you are feeling lazy .....
__________________
sck5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-09-2016, 21:25   #34
Registered User

Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Boat: 41' yawl
Posts: 558
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Celestialsailor View Post
Having owned a Yawl, I would say a Jib & Jigger is suited for a Ketch...and then marginal at that.
Curious why you feel that way - I go jib + jigger all the time on a Rhodes Reliant. It's an incredibly useful option. I understand that a yawl is not an ideal rig for a number of reasons, but don't understand folks downplaying the benefit of jib+jigger on them. Just the other night I was doing a close reach into 22kts apparent at about 7kts... The rail was in the water (~30 degree heel) and I was getting tired. I dropped the main, resumed at 6kts with less than 15 degree heel. So nice.
__________________
chris95040 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-09-2016, 21:30   #35
Registered User
 
ErikFinn's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Malaysia, Thailand
Boat: Beneteau Oceanis 430
Posts: 764
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Three pages going but no photos..??

__________________
ErikFinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-09-2016, 23:43   #36
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 10,014
Send a message via Skype™ to Jim Cate
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Quote:
Originally Posted by chris95040 View Post
Curious why you feel that way - I go jib + jigger all the time on a Rhodes Reliant. It's an incredibly useful option. I understand that a yawl is not an ideal rig for a number of reasons, but don't understand folks downplaying the benefit of jib+jigger on them. Just the other night I was doing a close reach into 22kts apparent at about 7kts... The rail was in the water (~30 degree heel) and I was getting tired. I dropped the main, resumed at 6kts with less than 15 degree heel. So nice.
I'm curious too: why is that (J&J) better than reefing the main on a sloop or cutter? At least on our current boat, and it's predecessor, at 22 apparent and close reaching, either one reef in the main and the genoa or full main and the staysail or Solent jib would be very quick and quite comfy (barring a nasty sea state). Neither of those options is difficult to apply, and will work up to a bit more wind strength, too.

Jim
__________________
Jim and Ann
s/v Insatiable II, back in Hobart for slipping and other unpleasant activities.
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 00:21   #37
Registered User
 
double u's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 452
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

"...a boat that you feel good heading back to in your dinghy..."
rarely does one find an incredibly important criteria so well put!
__________________
double u is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 00:41   #38
Senior Cruiser
 
Jim Cate's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2008
Location: cruising SW Pacific
Boat: Jon Sayer 1-off 46 ft fract rig sloop strip plank in W Red Cedar
Posts: 10,014
Send a message via Skype™ to Jim Cate
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Quote:
Originally Posted by double u View Post
"...a boat that you feel good heading back to in your dinghy..."
rarely does one find an incredibly important criteria so well put!
Finding your boat to be aesthetically pleasing is indeed a nice thing, but to me is not "incredibly important" when choosing a boat for bluewater cruising.

A truly ugly boat would be hard to live with, but the undeniable beauty of the Bermuda is of small importance to one who lives at sea and in remote anchorages.

Jim
__________________
Jim and Ann
s/v Insatiable II, back in Hobart for slipping and other unpleasant activities.
Jim Cate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 01:52   #39
Registered User
 
double u's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 452
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

I would avoid a companionway like the Rhodes Reliant's though at all cost!
and for us and others it is very lucky indeed, that we find the aesthetics of many contemporary boats very pleasing too (at least pleasing enough that we would never buy a Bermuda 40 of that age for so much money, never mind "bombproof build"...)
with the reservation that we never sailed one I'm sorry to have to say:
to me it seems aesthetics are the sole criteria, that the B40 has going for her, absolutely everything else seems terrible from my rtw-point-of-view
__________________
double u is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 02:36   #40
Moderator
 
Dockhead's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: [S]Hamble (Spring and Fall)[/S], Cowes (Winter), Baltic (Summer) (the boat!); somewhere in the air (me!)
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
Posts: 17,225
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Quote:
Originally Posted by jalmberg View Post
Actually, the long overhangs are the main negative, in my book, and possibly a deal killer. Hard to imagine hanging a windvane over that stern. I'd probably have to use a combination of sheet-to-tiller and autopilot for self-steering.

My other concern is the lack of opening portlights. Fine for Maine, I guess, but not ideal for the tropics!

Mizzens are a mystery to most modern sailors, but having sailed a wooden yawl for many years, I think they are handy things to have, for many reasons. There's a great video on OffcenterHarbor.com that illustrates some of them on a Concordia Yawl (another heart-throb of mine.)

I'm very partial to cruising on interesting and beautiful boats, because they are instant friend-makers in lonely ports. I can't tell you how many people who have rowed over to say hi, simply because they had to admire my rather unusual boat.

I've always owed heavy displacement boats with 300-ish ratings, so she *would* be fast for me!

The interior seems fairly palatial to me, but I have always sailed old-fashioned boats, and probably always will.

The boat's age is another negative, but I'm looking at Maine boats that have spent most of their lives wintering in sheds. I've never had much in the way of electronic systems on my boats, other than autopilots, so my power & gadget requirements are minimal.

It's probably a fall fling that I'll get over quickly, but they sure are pretty.

I agree with you about the mizzen, and disagree with my friends here -- it's a very good thing for a long distance cruiser, even the tiny one of a yawl, for a list of different reasons.


I will, however, agree with them on the other points. There's no reason in the world why you could not circumnavigate on a boat like that -- it will be strong enough for sure.

But almost every practical side of this boat will be inferior to almost any more modern boat. This boat is very slow compared to more modern 40 footers with much longer waterlines, there is no storage space (modern 30 footers have more interior volume), upwind performance will be poor with that underbody and keel configuration, ventilation will be poor for tropical climates.

These boats are floating works of art and best used that way, not as a practical long distance cruising boats.

IMHO, of course.

There are plenty of pretty boats which will work well for that purpose.

And you can find some of them with a ketch rig. I came close to buying an Oyster 55 (the old 53 with the transom extension) with a ketch rig for probably not much more money than a good Bermuda Yawl would have cost. Now THAT is a great long distance cruising boat, and a real beauty -- Holman & Pye design.

You will give up some upwind ability with a ketch due to windage and sails blanketing each other, but this doesn't matter much in the trade winds. And you get millions of advantages, plus lots of different sails to play with -- not just the mizzen, but fisherman, mizzen staysail; one guy on here even flies two (!) symmetrical spinnakers on his ketch. Fisherman and mizzen staysail are superlative trade winds sails.

You might have a look at boat for sale in the UK; a bit cheaper now due to the fall of the pound after Brexit.



Good luck.
__________________
Dockhead is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 04:52   #41
Registered User

Join Date: May 2014
Location: USA
Boat: 41' yawl
Posts: 558
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
I'm curious too: why is that (J&J) better than reefing the main on a sloop or cutter? At least on our current boat, and it's predecessor, at 22 apparent and close reaching, either one reef in the main and the genoa or full main and the staysail or Solent jib would be very quick and quite comfy (barring a nasty sea state). Neither of those options is difficult to apply, and will work up to a bit more wind strength, too.

Jim
Its not 'better', that's your word. I'm just quite pleased with the arrangement of a yawl.

If I'm heading out and the wind is strong, the difference in effort to go up on deck and get the main untied, raised and reefed versus going to the aft deck, behind my dodgers and surrounded in pushpit to put up the little guy, is undeniable.

We go out sailing to enjoy ourselves, and I've found j&j immensely helpful in that regard.
__________________
chris95040 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 06:15   #42
Registered User
 
DDabs's Avatar

Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Caribbean
Boat: Caliber 40LRC
Posts: 1,486
Images: 15
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ErikFinn View Post
Three pages going but no photos..??


here's one off google: mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

__________________
DDabs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 06:32   #43
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: New York
Boat: LeComte NorthEast 38
Posts: 346
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

another "poor man's version" of a Hinckley could be a LeComte.

the Northeast 38 looks quite similar to the B40 (Bill Trip for designer, comes in yawl or sloop, same lines, sturdy built, tons of brightwork; I don't think they have centerboard models though; built in Holland, many have a wood burning fireplace with traditional Dutch ceramic tiles), and they cost probably 1/3 of a Hinckley of the same vintage. then there's a bigger Fastnet 45.

LeComte boats were imported/finished out of New Rochelle, NY - so are mostly New England boats - although some have percolated around.

there's currently a Fastnet 45 in MA at under 70K, and a NE38 in RI for under 40K (both yawls). there's one in MD also - this one is a sloop, has a windvane, a fireplace, a spade rudder, and a very knowledgeable former owner.

ours is a sloop we bought in Salem MA. took delivery on the last week of October 2010, were seeing 10 foot waves, 40-50 kt winds on the Salem - Plymouth leg (we motored that day - we shouldn't have been out in the first place, but the forecast was calling for only "10-15, gusting to 25". while everyone in the cockpit was totally drenched, waves rolling over the boat throughout the day, she didn't groan once. (as another anecdote, when during a haul, a younger yard guy was trying to figure out where the bulkhead was, he knocked and knocked and finally said "I don't know about this one, it all sounds the same" - and his more seasoned colleague replied, "don't worry, poppits can go anywere on this boat".)

I am of course partial. we looked at a dozen or more boats when shopping, but no other boat tickled us the same way. it's too much work (it's a 1968), but sailing her (or even just looking at her in the harbor) is always a joy.

Anton
__________________
antoha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 06:36   #44
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Toronto area when not cruising
Boat: Bristol 45.5
Posts: 544
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Could you use a B40 for extended cruising? Of course you could. Is it the best choice in an absolute sense - no. Is it the best choice of a per dollar basis - far from it. As others have said it is very pricey, smallish, slow, initially tender boat. Looks great and that is important but there are a lot of other considerations that seem more important to me. I am a fan of Ted Hood's designs including some Bristols, Little Harbors and a few others. The hull shape and rig means they are faster, have more volume, do not heel as much and are cheaper. Most are centre boarders so you are able to get into shallow waters and still point well. Our Bristol is 5'/12'.
__________________
We are biting the bullet and selling Ainia (if anyone wants Bristol 45.5 in great shape let me know). Looking for something smaller and faster in light Lake Ontario winds, although we want to keep the new boat in the Caribbean for a few (number tbd) winters.
AiniA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-09-2016, 06:39   #45
Registered User
 
Lowcountry's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Charleston SC
Boat: 1988 Mason 44
Posts: 344
Re: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Yawl good choice for bluewater cruiser?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ErikFinn View Post
Three pages going but no photos..??

How about a Mason 44 video?

Again (IMO), every bit as pretty as the B40 and probably better suited for cruising. Willow is now named Dark Star, and will be cruising the Exumas this winter.
__________________

__________________
Lowcountry is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
Bermuda, cruise, cruiser, water

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale: Hinckley Bermuda 40 Custom Aft-Cabin Yawl Kim Petersen Classifieds Archive 46 26-04-2014 13:43
40' Bluewater Cruiser Choice Likato Monohull Sailboats 77 31-03-2011 10:55
Hinckley Bermuda 40 vs Tartan 37 endurance Monohull Sailboats 58 16-10-2010 03:33
Best Choice of Destination for this Summer - NC to Bermuda or Bahamas ? Snail's Pace Atlantic & the Caribbean 12 19-05-2010 14:17


Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 13:05.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.