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Old 05-05-2007, 20:43   #16
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Yo 3813,

very handsome craft. A seaworthy design well-chosen for those latitudes. Thanks for showing us, and good luck with your plans.

best, andy
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Old 05-05-2007, 21:09   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike d.
i would think rolly would come about with the amount of ballast and the depth of the keel as in more modern designs, which is more or less an appendage attached to the hull. the hanna really doesn't have much keel appendage if at all. i under stand that a chine would reduce roll, but multi chine would not in my opinion make much dif. compared to round bilge wood or glass as far as this design goes.
Yo Mike,

good observations. The multi-chine construction allows the boats made of flat panels (steel, aluminum, plywood) to more closely approximate the rounded shape of one made of planks or fiberglass. Other design factors, such as amount, density and location of ballast and location of center-of-gravity have a much greater influence on a boat's rolling tendencies, but a hard chine can add some stiffness. Even changing a wood mast to an aluminum one can make a big difference.

best, andy
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Old 08-05-2007, 01:39   #18
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Hey Jim,Yep they sure are pretty.some good buys down tassie also.And berths can be had real cheap.I lived down on the west coast for 2 four yr terms(work and play).Savage River for work,Sisters beach for play.Saved ya pic's in my folder.Mudnut.
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Old 21-05-2007, 19:46   #19
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Tassie fun

Yeah Mudnut, it's a beautiful coastline: Angie and I went for a drive up the north-west coast sort of just looking at boats, I reckon Wynyard (Inglis River) would be a great place to keep a boat. Going for a bit of a look down Savage River way soon. Where do you live now? Cheers, Jim.
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Old 21-05-2007, 20:58   #20
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To throw a little water on the fire. The Tahiti Ketch was designed for a sailing magazine in the last century. It was designed so that it was buildable by an amatuer with no experience. To make it easy to build by an unskilled amateur, the sailing performance was severely compromised.

There was an FRP version of the boat built called the Dreadnought 32. It had a superficial resemblance to the Westsail 32 but was a much inferior boat. The W32 is not known for it's superior boat speed but against the Dreadnought, the W32 looked like a lightweight hotrod. In light air, gave up at least a knot of boatspeed and more when the wind piped up.

Dreadnought also had significantly less interior volume than a W32. IIRC, the Dreadnought had a foot less beam and less displacement than the W32. As designed, the Hanna Ketch also had way less sail area with a painfully low aspect which would have made light air performance abysmal. The dreadnought had a cutter rig with a taller stick and carried more sail than Hannah's original but still think it had a lower sail area/displacement ratio than the W32.

If you like this type of boat, I'd reccomend looking at the W32 or an Atkins design. It's a whole lot more boat and a lot better sailor.

FWIW, any boat with slack bilges will be rolly dead downwind. The slack bilges reduce wetted surface helping light air performance and give the boat an easy motion on all other points of sail, however. Our solution was not to sail dead downwind. Reaching off gives an easy motion and superior boat speed both over the bottom and through the water.

Aloha
Peter O.
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Old 22-05-2007, 01:41   #21
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G'day Jim,

Ipswich Brisbane,Savage River!!!!!,I have a few stories about SR.Open cut iron ore mine.(WAS)Turn right at the Fingerpost cross-road,a bit after coming out of the Hellyer Gorge (SP?)If ya like fishing, between Waratah and Luina there is the Heazlewood R. Ya can only pull off to the left and park,fish the run to the rapids.Better still,cross the rapids and follow the stream down a bit.Fistie little brook trout.Savage should be just about non existant now and ya keep driving straight thru Savage River township on the same road that leads into it.The road to the river it's self is Quartz and rough.There used to be a boat down the river called the Arcacia II that serviced tours and run by the local ranger.Some parts of the river run 600 plus ft.Blah,blah, blah Savage River.....Tassie rules.Mudnut
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Old 04-03-2008, 08:44   #22
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extra heavy hanna

talking about how slow the hanna tahiti is check this one out.

1939 Hanna Tahiti Ketch Tahiti double ended Ketch Boat For Sale=

Its a 36000 lb 37' wood boat glassed below the water line. I can only guess that this boat is quite slow. Has anyone here ever seen a boat that heavy at 37 feet? The engine is big enough (if it runs). I hope someone restores it, its a great looking boat. I
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Old 04-03-2008, 09:13   #23
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Well it appears to have tile on the sole... and a cast iron stove.

Thats got to account for a few thousand pounds right there.
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Old 04-03-2008, 09:36   #24
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Great thread… when I was a kid I had a magazine (Popular Mechanics, Science and Mechanic or some such, can’t recall…) that had the plans for one of these in it… that version was strip-planked as I recall and beyond anything I could afford from my paper-route revenues… well before the Westsails had begun to populate the planet… Then along came Mete’ and his book and I immediately started dreaming Westsail dreams, which were equally beyond my buck sergeant’s pay, but they kept the dream-machine going… Didn’t Weston Farmer draw up a steel version of Hanna’s design… well, in any case, they both serve the purpose… maybe neither is quite up to the turn of speed of the low D/L speedsters, but they were out there well before the techno-gizmo brigade and like most point-men, trustworthiness is most important… I think they succeeded wonderfully…

Love that pic of the wood-stove; I’m still conniving how to sneak a Lunenburg (now Navigator, as I recall) Sardine aboard mine…
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Old 04-03-2008, 12:04   #25
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One of those was in Moorea when we were there. An Oz boat finishing up one of the fastest circumnavigations in history, just over 10 years. The boat was home built with an aft cabin which the diesel mechanic owner had turned into a workshop complete with lathe.

We talked sailing experience and they were amazed that we were able to average 118nm per day on our W32. They celebrated when they broke 100nmpd and averaged well below the century mark.
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Old 05-03-2008, 06:10   #26
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<They celebrated when they broke 100nmpd…>

Still, that’s a reasonably quick machine-shop… but your point is well taken; many of those more contemporary renderings, if classic appearing, of higher D/L designs may not have the ultimate turn of speed of the fast boats, but they can do what they do day after day, with little or no fanfare… Crealock, Bingham, Benford and others who continued to dabble with more full keels come to mind… let alone the somewhat more distinctive designers like Farmer, Whitholz, Colvin (was always fascinated with his Gazelle), etc., etc…
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Old 09-07-2008, 14:14   #27
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My father is selling his steel chine hull John Hanna designed Tahiti ketch. Its the bare hull and deck with cabin. It was built in FL buy a boatyard a few years ago and has been in storage ever since. It has the primer coat on it already from the boatyard, and is ready to be sandblasted and painted.
After he retired my mother became ill and he has to take care of her and can no longer start to work on it.

He is asking $32k for it. Its in perfect condition and sitting on its trailer ready to be towed away. It would save someone a lot of money due to the high cost of steel these days, and of course time. saturnbremen@yahoo.com
Its located in Massachusetts usa.
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Old 30-04-2009, 05:19   #28
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18K for sale tahitiana / Tahiti ketch hull and deck

WE REDUCED THE PRICE FOR A QUICK SALE 18K
For sale: Steel Tahiti Ketch--Bare Hull . Weston Farmer's updated steel
version of John Hanna's famous Tahiti Ketch. 32' on deck, 37' LOA, 10' 2" beam,
4'4' draft. All steel work expertly fabricated at Ron Barnes steel boatyard in
St Augustine, Fl. The naval architect Phil Bolger praised Barnes as "one of the
most expert and efficient builders of steel boats in the country." See also the
book "Steel Away" for his craftmanship. The vessel was built in 1993, always
kept under cover. --hull,deckhouse, bulwarks, bowsprit --keel with built in
engine cooler --rudder, shaft log, engine bed, ss chain locker--ss top rails,
cabin handrails, and stanchions--companionway hatch and deck hatch. The vessel
can be ketch or cutter rigged. This sailing vessel is specifically designed for
strength and heavy weather safety; it is capable of carrying stores, fuel, and
water for extended bluewater cruising or live aboard in the tropic islands. It
is on a steel frame trailer, located in north central Massachusetts. 18K firm.
my email is saturnbremen@ yahoo.com
I posted a picture of her in the photo section under "tahiti for sale"
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Old 16-06-2010, 07:45   #29
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My last boat was a Tahiti, she did great off the wind and ok on the wind though not a SantaCruise 27.. Sailed right through a Newport 30 race LOL and boy were they all quiet... 20,000 lbs carries a lot of way in fitful wind. Rolly? Aren't all sailboats? Actually she was a bit too stiff when I bought her. Sails herself for hours or days. My Aries was only occaisionally needed. Absolutely bulletproof boat!
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Old 25-04-2011, 00:45   #30
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Re: Hanna Tahitian Ketch Knowledge

I realize that this is an old post but, what the heck I'd like to defend my Dreadnaught Hull # 7 a flat-top cutter.

Quoting roverhi:

There was an FRP version of the boat built called the Dreadnought 32. It had a superficial resemblance to the Westsail 32 but was a much inferior boat. The W32 is not known for it's superior boat speed but against the Dreadnought, the W32 looked like a lightweight hotrod. In light air, gave up at least a knot of boatspeed and more when the wind piped up.

This is just wrong. Check the numbers at Carls Sail Calculator and consider my own experience where I have clocked Molly B at 7.2 on a fairly close reach in force 4-5. In light air with my cruising spin up I havent been aware of issues with speed over the one time I've crewed on a Westsail up in Seattle in light conditions.

Dreadnought also had significantly less interior volume than a W32.
I haven't been in a cabin top model so maybe given the beam but my flat-top has plenty of space.
Dreadnought had a foot less beam and less displacement than the W32.

By 28 lbs.

As designed, the Hanna Ketch also had way less sail area with a painfully low aspect which would have made light air performance abysmal.
Thats why the sail plan was adjusted by Bill Crealock and the boat was lengthened and has deeper draft.
The dreadnought had a cutter rig with a taller stick and carried more sail than Hannah's original
by 250 sq ft if I remember right.

but still think it had a lower sail area/displacement ratio than the W32.

Wrong...greater actually

Bud Taplin, who worked on these boats told me that they are very good sailors and my experience has borne this out. She has excellent motion the large rudder makes her more manuverable than you might think and she does not have excessive weather helm. Nor have I found her to be exssesive in her rolling downwind but maybe this is because I try to avoid taking the seas strait on the stern. I can attest to the robustness of the construction.
Dreadnoughts were done in transverse lay-up and from a hull core sample I have are 1 and one eigths inch thick above the waterline with good cloth saturation etc.

Harry Heckle who now holds the record for oldest circumnavigator went 'round in his Idle Queen twice and didn't seem to have a problem.

Props for your great posts and much greater open water experience roverhi but you missed the mark on this boat...
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