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Old 23-04-2016, 04:58   #16
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

The Cav 32 looks like a great boat. Designed by Bob Salthouse, a very respected name in boats.
If the bunks are long enough for you to sleep well, then I would just be very sure to buy one that doesn't have big osmosis problems. Do some research to see if owners are having problems. I have just finished putting an epoxy/fibreglass skin on my S&S34. Big job, beautiful boat though. A well built boat like the Cavaliers & S&S34 should only have minor osmosis blisters, just make sure you don't buy a lemon & remember it's a buyers market at the moment. Buying an old & cheap boat, you should expect to spend lots on doing it up. If it's a good solid boat I would just look at the rudder very critically, and probably rebuild it if you are going offshore. I am hoping to use the original mould to knock out a new one for my boat.
When you find one you want to buy, consider getting a shipwright to survey it. Beware of regular surveyors, too many are just interested in the bucks instead of your welfare.
40k is not a lot for a cruising boat these days, but they are out there. Have a look at the S&S34 Assoc web site.
I hope you find a gem.
Dave
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Old 23-04-2016, 05:01   #17
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

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Originally Posted by ozskipper View Post
Duncansons are also very well respected. There would be nothing shameful or dangerous taking one of those across "the pond". Though, I would suspect that you would pay more for a blue water ready Dunc compared to the same Cav32.

You could also consider a Swanson 32. The down/up side is the full keel. Most people want a fin keel these days, so re-sell may take a little longer. But they are very well respected and possibly in your 40k range. The down side of the full keel is lessened maneuverability. The upside is no keel bolts and more directional stability.
+1 :thumbup::thumbup: the cavs are balsa core hull I think, not sure if its an issue or not. Much less chance of water in the hull, if its done right I guess. Also look at the Jouberts ie the brolga's

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Old 23-04-2016, 05:02   #18
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

Sorry, edit Double Post...
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Old 23-04-2016, 05:03   #19
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

Triple post... not sure what happened!
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Old 23-04-2016, 07:26   #20
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

$10k seems very low as a budget for upgrades. Just a windvane and a watermaker for all those showers blows straight through that. Dingy? Outboard? Canvas? Heat? All adds up fast.
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Old 23-04-2016, 21:21   #21
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

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Hi Ann thanks for your tip on S&S 34. I have heard good reports on them and they are on my list. I have not yet been on/in one. In Melbourne I hear there are people on waitlists for them. They are legends. I will keep a lookout and may have to lift my budget but likely worth the extra. I am expecting to add $10k+ for extras for blue water cruising. slanyon
If you find a boat that is ALREADY fully -- I mean FULLY -- equipped for bluewater cruising, you can expect to spend about your budget in upkeep over the first year or so. That's upkeep -- repairs, replacement parts, maybe one or two new items that fail -- not buying much new kit. There is just not way you can equip a boat for safe, let alone comfortable, bluewater cruising for that much money. Many have done it and survived, but I don't recommend it unless you are a risk taker. This is one of the biggest financial miscalculations that people make. There's an obscene initial investment involved in equipping a cruising sailboat. This is one reason that boat prices vary so much. A fully equipped boat is easily worth an extra US$50K. A good surveyor will tote this stuff up and add it to the estimated value. If this is hard to believe, just go online and add up a few prices, say for a new liferaft, foulweather gear, a couple new life vests (do you really want to use those grimy 5-year-old things that have expired auto inflators?...), a chart plotter (if it's over five years old, it's waiting to die -- could last another ten years or another ten minutes), a sea anchor, even some spare parts or whatever. It adds up fast fast fast.

I have a Pacific Seacraft 37 (great bluewater boat, by the way). Here's a website that has some good pictures of this kind of boat fully equipped for bluewater cruising:

https://pacificseacraft37.com/

Now here's a lovely version of the same kind of boat that doesn't appear to be ready to go very far due to lack of equipment. I think it'll need a huge chunk of money and some work done to be ready to go bluewater (at least for me to feel safe):

1988 Pacific Seacraft Crealock 37 Sail New and Used Boats for Sale
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Old 24-04-2016, 07:36   #22
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

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Originally Posted by Lantau View Post

(...)

There's an obscene initial investment involved in equipping a cruising sailboat.

(...)
(the bold font is mine)

This is true.

As I see it, it is related to the Western concept of cruising.

It is way less expensive to go sailing, even extensively, than it is to go cruising. The most expensive proposition is to buy a boat, keep her at the dock and keep on adding items.

Avoid cruising, at all costs ;-) pun intended.

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Old 24-04-2016, 07:51   #23
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

In my experience, these are the most common major money eaters in getting a boat ready to sail offshore:

- hull repairs (serious osmosis, ballast bolts, etc),
- structure repairs (a new rudder /and or fittings, soggy mast steps, etc.),
- re-powering (the engine very old or very worn),
- standing rigging (complete renewal, with new chain-plates, mast plates, etc.),
- new sails,
- new systems (if required).

A sound boat (updated as above) may need only a minimal outlay to go offshore.

As I voted before, the list of possible upgrades and improvements is unlimited. The opposite take: getting a strong and safe boat and going sailing is the other option. It takes good judgement and anyone new to the game is not likely to know the difference.

Any prospective owner would be well advised to introspect ahead of any financial commitment. Owning a boat can be a very expensive adventure or not, depending on how we use the boat and how we sort our 'must have' lists.

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Old 24-04-2016, 17:28   #24
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

Maybe it's just me but the only major difference I saw between the two PS37s was the one for sale needed a windvane, and maybe a staysail, to head out.
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Old 25-04-2016, 07:51   #25
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

It may be next to impossible to guess the actual condition of the boat from looking at broker's or seller's information.

The broker and seller will want to show ONLY the good things. The buyer (esp the prospective offshore sailor) is interested in the WORST things.

One must see the boat with the buyer's eyes and the buyer must do their own survey to arrive at their own judgement.

This assumes knowledge on the side of the buyer, which is only the case when it is our second or third boat. Hence a newcomer to the offshore boat field is exposed to plenty of extra risk.

Solution: hire an experienced offshore sailor as your aide or hire a well respected boat surveyor and tell them specifically that you want to take the boat far offshore.

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Old 25-04-2016, 08:35   #26
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

Westsail or Pacific Seacraft hard to beat for displacement, solid cruisers.
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Old 26-04-2016, 05:25   #27
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

Has anyone spotted a S&S 34 for sale which looks like a good deal? I am in Melbourne Australia. thanks
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Old 26-04-2016, 18:53   #28
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

http://m.yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-monohulls/sparkman-stephens-34/183710

This boat has the lot and was recently prepared for a major voyage. Eucalypt. It's very good buying. It's in WA but these boats are all about passage making.
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Old 26-04-2016, 19:05   #29
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

Well the link didn't work, so just have a look on yachthub, it has a solid dodger in the style of Jessica Watsons. The dodger is new but doesn't help the looks of what was a very beautiful yacht.
There is others advertised on the Australian association website.
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Old 28-04-2016, 19:51   #30
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Re: Getting into blue water Cruising

I am wondering about a Phantom 32. How do they compare to a Cavalier 32 for coastal cruising (Australia). They look similar but how will they compare when I am south of Gabo island at 3am, enroute to Eden?
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