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Old 26-10-2009, 19:20   #1
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Do I Really Need a Bluewater Boat ?

I'm really diggin the Hunter line (cheap, lots of space). Do I truly need a boat that can take a 100kn beating? I want to sail RTW.
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Old 26-10-2009, 19:47   #2
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If you are going offshore, you need a bluewater boat. But that doesn't exclude the hunters. More than one hunter has gone RTW. The key is the route and timing. I wouldn't take em around the horn, but there are few boats I would. You may have to beef up this or that, glass in the keel (I would at least), and if it doesn't have one - add a skeg. I am excluding the 80s hunter, those were not consistanly built well.
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Old 26-10-2009, 19:58   #3
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There's been lots of discussion (debate) regarding blue water boats, Hunters, etc. If you're seriously considering offshore passage making... I'm not sure that 'cheap' and 'lots of space' would be at the top of my priority list. I'd be more interested in how the boat will react (including comfort) offshore, as well as storage (for all the spare parts and provisions), tankage (fuel and water), as well as the safety aspects of a sea going boat. Several other priorties will also need to be considered.

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Old 26-10-2009, 19:59   #4
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Yes. You need something other than a Hunter. Can it be done? Yup. But not me.
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Old 26-10-2009, 20:12   #5
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The answer is yes - you can sail a Hunter RTW, but you will not go round in the same level of comfort and safety as a bluewater boat, and it might not even work out cheaper.

Taking just one example: Your ground tackle: probably not enough chain, probably the anchor is too small, probably the windlass is too small, probably the bow roller is too flimsey.

Now you can go RTW with this, but you won't sleep very well and there is a much higher change that you will loose your boat one night when 40-50knots comes throught the not-so-great anchorage that you will stop in from time to time.

So you have the choice of replacing all this before you leave (it's not looking so cheap now..) or take a higher risk of loosing your boat.

Taking each system on your boat and assessing it's "fitness for purpose" you will quickly realise that the boat has been designed for light contitions and marina life (as most production boats are - that's the market).

Taking a production boat RTW is like taking a small towncar off road. It can be done, a few have even done it sucessfully, but it really isn't what it's designed to do.
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Old 26-10-2009, 20:25   #6
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The 2 or 3 biggest Hunters would be fine. 45, 49 and 50 footers.

No new boat comes with enough anchor chain or the best anchor. You just clip on an extra 50 meters of chain and a Rocna or Manson Suprime.

Your RTW would be via the Coconut Run keeping in the tropics and the correct season... but then who wants to freeze their butts off round the Horn anyway?

Hunters are affordable. That means you can buy a new or near new boat. You don't want an old one.

Also you need to see theres some posts where a new Hunter was badly built and or bad post sales service. I think you NEED to watch the build at the factory and have a lawyer draw up come conditions for the dealer / factory to agree to.

If you are looking at hunters there are other production boats out there too that might be competative in price.

We has seen a number of very old boats in the 28 foot to 35 foot range doing the pacific, Australia and Asia... I can only figure that a large new Hunter would be much better fun, and safer!


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Old 26-10-2009, 20:28   #7
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I find it odd that someone who has the skills and know-how to sail RTW would ask such a question...
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Old 26-10-2009, 20:29   #8
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I've done long passages on hunters, and the like. The large and roomy interior is great at the dock, and the most obnoxious place in the world to try to navigate in a seaway while heeled with a wet sole!!! The other part that makes these boats steer well and tack quickly in flat water makes misery in chop. But like any other boat they'll take a lot more than you can.
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Old 26-10-2009, 21:07   #9
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Originally Posted by Christian Van H View Post
I find it odd that someone who has the skills and know-how to sail RTW would ask such a question...
I don't have said skills, but there is no harm in looking ahead is there?
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Old 26-10-2009, 22:57   #10
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I don't have said skills, but there is no harm in looking ahead is there?
No harm at all.

If its your dream to go then do it. Buy a boat now, learn to sail it in the next year or two and them get cracking!!!!!!!!!!!

Its not rocket science!!!!!!

Even those cranky old Vikings could sail!


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Old 26-10-2009, 22:58   #11
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Thanks Mark! That is what I am hoping to do, but I want to make sure I end up with a boat I can use a year from now, rather than having to upgrade.
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Old 26-10-2009, 23:18   #12
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i'm looking to buy a boat and im a complete novice. Would you mind explaining what you are refering to when you describe a production boat? also what is rtw.

also i dont konw what a blue water boat is.. sorry for the dumb questions..
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Old 26-10-2009, 23:33   #13
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Originally Posted by goldsholl View Post
i'm looking to buy a boat and im a complete novice. Would you mind explaining what you are refering to when you describe a production boat? also what is rtw.

also i dont konw what a blue water boat is.. sorry for the dumb questions..
regards

michael
The only dumb question is one which is not asked.
Rtw is “Round the World”
“Production boat” is one which is produced in mass which has to suit the most type of people thus has the most compromises.
“Blue water” boat is purpose built boat for rtw
The hard question to answer is what constitutes a Blue water boat. I will leave that for the experts on the forum
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Old 26-10-2009, 23:36   #14
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i'm looking to buy a boat and im a complete novice. Would you mind explaining what you are refering to when you describe a production boat? also what is rtw.

also i dont konw what a blue water boat is.. sorry for the dumb questions..
regards

michael
RTW = Round the world

Production boat is a modern boat being built now using regular production lines. Very inexpensive.

Blue Water Boats means - theres a strong debate here about what it means - an old design boat hand built using old techniques. Or a modern design boat thats very heavily built also by hand. Needless to say very expensive.

Because some production boats are built so inexpensively these days they appear to be too cheap to stand up to the rigours of the ocean.

Some are clearly not designed to go to sea. Just designed for day sailing.

The debate is long and hard. I would never sail in one of some peoples opinions of a Blue Water boat... but we have sailed 17,000 nms half way around the world and love the facilities of the modern designs: large comfortable cabins, saloons, cockpits and swim platforms.

But each to their own



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Old 26-10-2009, 23:48   #15
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I'm really diggin the Hunter line (cheap, lots of space). Do I truly need a boat that can take a 100kn beating? I want to sail RTW.
Hunters have a reputation for pretty thin walls, weak keel joint, etc.
The last thing you want in a bluewater boat is a beamy interior, unless you have a ton of handholds. There are a lot of relatively cheap used boats that will take you anywhere you want to go. Are you looking new? Used? Length? Other preferences?
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