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Old 10-12-2017, 22:27   #76
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

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Originally Posted by straydog4612 View Post
You seem unhappy. :
Me unhappy? Hilarious.
I am the one living the dream on a boat remember.

You are the one stuck on land making the senility comments
THAT sounds like someone who is unhappy.

But thanks for the laugh. :-)


Add: you are right, I am unhappy.
I just realized I only have 8 anchovy stuffed olives left for afternoon martinis and we are at least 14 olives away from a new supply.
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Old 11-12-2017, 01:58   #77
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

I'm OK with being critical of engine usage if it's from a Green POV, but then the one casting stones better be walking a low-footprint walk themselves.

Just imposing a "sailing good motoring bad" personal preference on others for no rational reason, makes no sense to me.

And I see no reason for getting personal about each others' psychological states.
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Old 11-12-2017, 02:45   #78
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

I have not seen mention of a cockpit enclosure. For protection from the elements, a complete enclosure is essential far as I am concerned. And it must have full standing headroom if possible. This makes easier access to the deck and you can stand up at the helm in full protection. It also gives you a nice extra deck level living space with a view. In a monohull, this can usually be obtained gracefully in a boat over 44feet or so. Having this big soft cover on our center cockpit ketch does make access to the boom difficult for furling our main, but its a tradeoff I live with.
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Old 11-12-2017, 03:52   #79
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

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Originally Posted by straydog4612 View Post
My locale is Queensland Australia. Budget 50K - 80K. Quite a few of us do know the Swansons, but I am asking a more pertinent question as to what would suit our age, racing and fast boats are not suitable to our advancing years. All our sailing will be the east coast of Australia, just really wanting to change my backyard from dirt to sea.
We would be interested in what other people may recommend, probably because they can identify with the change of tack. Thanks for responding.
Hi! I just turned 71. When I was 66, I bought my 5th sailboat, a 5.9 metric tons Ericson 34' that I sailed alone for a 11 day offshore passage. Sundance size (Displacement & sail area) is perfect for me alone & the question is what size can you handle ALONE, when your crew is sleeping or off duty below ??? When the weather gets rough, can you walk/crawl forward to unstuck your furling genoa & remember that you'll need some extra money to get your baby offshore ready: Life raft, spares etc...
Cheers
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Old 11-12-2017, 07:33   #80
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

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Originally Posted by Simi 60 View Post
We come from a sailing background, have had them all our life until recently, but see so many people cruising on sail boats but motoring up and down the coast that we wonder why people buy them if they don't actually sail.
Cruisers without time constraints seem to wait for calm weather not conducive to making miles under sail.

Perhaps a relatively economical trawler would be a better choice?
I suppose that an argument can be made for trawlers but I understand why many people seem to prefer a sailboat even if they motor a lot.

For example, my best friend has a 38' lobster yacht that he cruises in along the Maine coast during the summer. His cruising speed is between 8-10 knots and he is feeding a 350hp diesel at a little above half throttle (not good for the engine) to make that happen. If he pushes the power up more than that it gets loud and vibrates noticeably and he only gains a few (literally) more knots. My 47' sailboat cruises under power at 7 knots and uses an 88hp turbodiesel that is WAY more fuel efficient and you can barely hear from the cockpit. He has much more deck space and a fly bridge but my sailboat has much nicer accommodations below. His boat is wider forward and bashes into head seas where my boat seems to mostly slip through them, at least by comparison. His boat seems to be almost constantly rolling if there are any waves present. His motorboat lacks having even something close to the ultimate stability that almost any sailboat has, so in offshore conditions I think I'd be constantly fearing for my life and certainly wouldn't be as comfortable as on a sailboat. When conditions are right for sailing, I can shut off the small amount of noise my engine makes and still make progress towards my destination, and have fun doing it. He's stuck with the noise and vibration for 100% of the time he's moving. Yes, sails and rigging cost money but if you're going to spend most of your time motoring and only sail while reaching or running, you don't exactly need the latest and greatest high tech rigging and sails so those costs can be quite moderate.

Trawlers make pretty good mobile condo's but unless they are quite large and you have a correspondingly large fuel budget, I think a slightly longer sailboat is a better choice, even if you plan to motor a big portion of the time you'll be underway. If you're mostly going to sit at a dock, the fuel costs and comfort/safety while underway aren't a factor so you're probably better off with the additional room in a shorter/wider trawler, which will also help keep slip rental costs low.

Now that my friends son is about to graduate from high school and thinks he's outgrown hanging out with mom and dad, they soon will be able to spend longer continuous periods of time aboard, so they have been making noises about trading "up" to a cruising sailboat.
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Old 11-12-2017, 09:45   #81
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

I'm 60 my wife is 51. We moved up from a 38 C&C racer/ cruiser when adopted two young boys a fee years ago. I didn't want to go from the performance of my previous boat to a tank. We bought a Cheoy Lee 47 Pedrick Center Cockpit. We love the boat, it has all the comfort we like with the performance I like. Granted the loads are bigger but with lazy Jacks for the main and roller furler for the headsail and Yankee we find it quite manageable. Manual winches but all properly sized makes it doable. Anchor windlass for sure. Keeping it simple from a rigging standpoint is also a key point. I am replacing most of the blocks and sheives to reduce the friction loads, and also making the reefing system as simple and easy to use as possible is key to making the boat as easy to use as possible. There are many "performace cruisers" from the 80's on up available for a fair price that should fit the bill for what you want. A modified full keel or even better a conservative fin keel with a skeg hung rudder will give you the speed you need with the stability you'll like in a seaway.
Center cockpits are nice for the aft cabin space but don't work as well under 40 feet. If it were just my wife and I we would probably go about in the 38 to 40 foot range.
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Old 02-02-2018, 06:54   #82
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

Thank you Sue for all your input. We did go to contract today on a southcoast 36, not what I originally was looking for by a long shot, but have come to understand that it will suit us perfectly and the comfort will have to offset our speed freak nature. It is in very good conditional, exceptional condition really, and I am satisfied with her and am happy with the tradeoff. The other good news was we took a deposit on our business yesterday, so we may be in the blue sooner than we thing, and it will be goodbye to the pub business that we have been doing 24/7 for over 10 years. I'm a happy chappie. I had to buy what I could afford, and more particularly what I could afford to maintain and something I know I personally will be able tohandle for quite a few years to come. The worst that can happen is if we really want a faster boat, we should be able to sell her quite quickly due to its exceptional condition. Cheers.
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Old 02-02-2018, 07:04   #83
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

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Originally Posted by straydog4612 View Post
We did go to contract today on a southcoast 36. The other good news was we took a deposit on our business yesterday, so we may be in the blue sooner than we thing, and it will be goodbye to the pub business that we have been doing 24/7 for over 10 years. I'm a happy chappie.
That's outstanding news! Congratulations on both.
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Old 02-02-2018, 07:09   #84
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

Thank you Sue for all your input. We did go to contract today on a southcoast 36, not what I originally was looking for by a long shot, but have come to understand that it will suit us perfectly and the comfort will have to offset our speed freak nature. It is in very good conditional, exceptional condition really, and I am satisfied with her and am happy with the tradeoff. The other good news was we took a deposit on our business yesterday, so we may be in the blue sooner than we thing, and it will be goodbye to the pub business that we have been doing 24/7 for over 10 years. I'm a happy chappie. I had to buy what I could afford, and more particularly what I could afford to maintain and something I know I personally will be able tohandle for quite a few years to come. The worst that can happen is if we really want a faster boat, we should be able to sell her quite quickly due to its exceptional condition. Cheers.
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Old 02-02-2018, 07:10   #85
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

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Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

Definitely, Cornish Crabber Pilot Cutter 30.
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Old 02-02-2018, 13:02   #86
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

Has your South Coast 36 got a bow thruster? A fair few that I survey have bow thrusters to help them overcome that long keel when manoeuvring in tight places.
They are nice yachts with plenty of room.
Cheers
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Old 02-02-2018, 14:30   #87
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

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Originally Posted by straydog4612 View Post
Thank you Sue for all your input. We did go to contract today on a southcoast 36, not what I originally was looking for by a long shot, but have come to understand that it will suit us perfectly and the comfort will have to offset our speed freak nature. It is in very good conditional, exceptional condition really, and I am satisfied with her and am happy with the tradeoff. The other good news was we took a deposit on our business yesterday, so we may be in the blue sooner than we thing, and it will be goodbye to the pub business that we have been doing 24/7 for over 10 years. I'm a happy chappie. I had to buy what I could afford, and more particularly what I could afford to maintain and something I know I personally will be able tohandle for quite a few years to come. The worst that can happen is if we really want a faster boat, we should be able to sell her quite quickly due to its exceptional condition. Cheers.
The one on Lake Macquarie?
Spotted it other day, looked like a good deal.
Hope the survey goes well for you, who do you plan to use?
We have a good surveyor in Sydney we have used a few times, even flew him to Melbourne to do our last boat.
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Old 02-02-2018, 16:29   #88
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

It is the one in Lake Macquarie, and it doesnt have a bow thruster, but neither did our first boat which was a folk boat. You can't have everything, but this little beauty has everything I need, everything on my wish list except watermaker. She was a compromise, but hey, today is the beginning of the rest of my life and am chomping at the bit to get back to the blue where we belong. Selling the business at the same time was mind blowing, so we are doing it sooner rather than later.
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Old 03-02-2018, 12:21   #89
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

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Originally Posted by jtsailjt View Post
I suppose that an argument can be made for trawlers but I understand why many people seem to prefer a sailboat even if they motor a lot.

For example, my best friend has a 38' lobster yacht that he cruises in along the Maine coast during the summer. His cruising speed is between 8-10 knots and he is feeding a 350hp diesel at a little above half throttle (not good for the engine) to make that happen. If he pushes the power up more than that it gets loud and vibrates noticeably and he only gains a few (literally) more knots. My 47' sailboat cruises under power at 7 knots and uses an 88hp turbodiesel that is WAY more fuel efficient and you can barely hear from the cockpit. :
I will counter with this snippet

Quote:
To me, the easiest way to gage whether slow speed running is detrimental over years and years of operation is to look at commercial fishing vessels with older designed engines from Detroit, Cat, Cummins, etc… Revisiting the “Detroit” mystique again, its longevity was built on engines rated to run at 1900-2100 RPM and above, but could only last for 30+ yrs when operated continuously at 1100-1600 RPM (again, well under 50% of rated HP)..These same engines in a “crew” boat used in the off-shore oil industry, would go through “top-ends” (or worse) just about yearly when run at close to their governor settings..The longest-lived engines that I’ve been involved with (hrs and yrs wise), have been engines in commercial or recreational trawler type applications run at 50% of rated HP or less..Yes, there are many other parts of the equation that leads to the life of a diesel engine, but I know from experience that running them slow (i.e. cruising for days on end at hull speeds or less) is NOT a cause for concern. But some obvious things to watch out for (when running slow) are being sure your coolant temp stays up to spec. and watching for any signs of wet stacking or slobbering..Some Detroits seem to do this, but I think it’s more of the general condition of that particular engine and is sometimes related to the design of the exhaust system.. A few minutes a day at higher cruise HP levels should be all that is necessary to clean things up should it be needed..

In closing, I’ll mention that although this topic is brought up quite often and many people preach that you’ve got to use a diesel hard if you want it to last, I’m still waiting to find one that was rebuilt before its time due to low speed use..Just the opposite seems to be always the norm.

https://www.sbmar.com/articles/low-s...arine-diesels/
and fwiw we barely hear our engine (engine room door open) or feel vibration on our 60fter doing 7.5 knots using around 100hp.
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Old 03-02-2018, 19:03   #90
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Re: Cruising boat for a 62 and 63 year old?.

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I will counter with this snippet
I replace my Ford Lehman 85 hp with an Iveco 100 hp. The Iveco is made by Fiat, who make more engines than any other. The new Iveco is rated to about 2800 rpm. Even after sitting in dry storage for over a year, it started yesterday after half a turn.
I run at 1800 max and never intend go over 2000 rpm. At 1200 we move along at about 5 knots and in a hurry we go 1500 to 1800 rpm.

I have seen engines need rebuild soon when run at their rated rpm and I have seen engines in good shape after 15 years commercial use that were never taken over 1800. I concur that slow-turning is much better.
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