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Old 21-10-2010, 18:21   #1
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Cruiser Advice for Pacific Isles Liveaboard

Hi All My husband and I are in the process of selling our place and are looking to buy our 1st yacht to live aboard for the next few years. We are Aussies based in Aus and want to spend our time cruising around meeting our neighbours in the Pacific Isles and maybe Sth Est Asia. We have no desire to go right 'round. We are not particularly experienced sailors; me- dad's wooden dinghy and several years of twilights mostly on 30's plus a couple of seasons on a pocket maxi. Him - several weeks bareboat chartering with mates in the whitsundays & some twilights. together - bareboat charter of a skanky 32' in thailand, biggest probs being lack of wind & a dead motor. Plus sailing school.

hopefully you can help answer some newbie Q's... & appologies if the answers to these Q's are burried in the forum but I did have a look

We are looking at used mono hull glass ships in the 42' to 46' range hopefully around a yr 2000 model, our budget is up to $150k - but less is better. Due to both pricing and boat choice it looks like the Americas are by far our best bet to buy.

Our first choice is the Hunter 44cc and second the Hunter 42cc - yep they look super comfy & to buy a US built boat is an incentive with the 5% import duty exemtion. However, we also are considering comperable Beneteaus & Jeanneaus. We would love any constructive feedback & advice on the pluses and minuses of these various boats from a technical & safety standpoint for our intended use. Also shoal v's deep draft?

I have noticed that most of these boats do not have 'extras' such as solar, wind gene etc... any suggestions on absolute neccessities & costs on what would bring a boat up to scratch for the pacific?

We (mainly me - yep I'm chicken little) are not jazzed about having to bring the boat across the Pacific from the States. I have looked at & talked to some specialist boat freighters with indicative pricing being around US$30k (big ouch). So the other options I have read are getting a container shipper to move the yacht if we organise a cradle - if anyone has done this can they let me know how it went & what it cost. Last resort - hire a professional skipper & crew for him to bring it across ourselves, can anyone give me a ball park figure on what this would cost? also, is it truely safe in one of these boats???

Sorry for being so long winded but am hoping to get some specific advice for our situation. Many many thanks
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Old 21-10-2010, 20:24   #2
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We kind of went through the same thoughts but from the other side of the world wondering if we should buy in Croatia, where the boats are far less expensive.

We finally just wimped out and paid the price plus 8.5% sales tax to buy a boat in the same area we wanted to cruise. Just scared us to buy in a foreign country.

We aren't ready to cross an ocean by ourselves either, but figure we will in a year or two.

As for equipment, well, you're going to need a water maker to get a boat across the ocean and a radar to watch the weather sure would be nice. Need a life raft (big chaching$$$$), some gear to hove to such as a drogue (small change tho), communications equipment, EPIRB. Hmmm. haven't done it myself yet, so don't know all that you need. Someone else should chime in that has actually made the crossings.

Anyone who speaks up and tells you which boat they think should or should not cross an ocean will probably be swatted and flamed. I think I just got flamed on a bluewater boat thread elsewhere on this forum for my opinions. Certainly got swatted, but I survived.

Seems like the cargo ships and build a cradle are your best bets. Hiring a captain and crew sounds pricey and there may be insurance issues. Plus moving a boat across the ocean puts some serious mileage on it that will wear it out, just like driving a new car across country makes it a used car.

Good luck though. It's fun to shop and even more fun to outfit your boat when you get it.

Hunter's and Jenneaus have beautiful interiors and great lines imo. I love the sugar scoops on the sterns of those boats. I've heard nothing but really good things about Beneteaus from professional boat captains who deliver the boats or charter them.
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Old 22-10-2010, 03:15   #3
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Hi, and welcome

Also remember some Beneteaus are built in the USA too so qualitfy for the 5% cut.

They are all fine for the Pacific.

The run down from the USA (either side) is fine and dandy and if you keep in the correct season there is no need to be a scardy-cat. As someone once told me about the Pacific run: Its Champagne Sailing.
Almost, anyway. The wind is a bit brisker than the pilots say, but its steady and squalls are manageable.

Just start slow.

If sailing was difficult how could the Americans have won their own cup?

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Old 22-10-2010, 03:38   #4
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I do not want to tear your choice of boats apart. Without starting any opinionated debates, the makes you have mentioned are well marketed in Australia; however, there are so many other better built American built boats in the price range you are looking at. Here are a couple of recent threads that will give you an idea of what I am talking about.

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...ats-48665.html

Hello Everyone - We'd Like Your Opinion

If you are looking for real value and all the necessary bits and pieces some of the well maintained and outfitted older boats recommended in the first thread represent real value. Likewise, if you wanted something brand spanking new, although marginally shorter, I can’t see anything wrong with the Island Packet Estero that you will find a link to in the second thread.

There’s nothing in this for me except the hope that I might get similar advice and assistance when my current boat decides to grow. Also something to do while I am sitting around bored senseless with the flu!

Opps, I forgot to mention that considering the value some of these boats represent compared to what is on the market over here the 30k transit fee seems trivial. While it might be more fun to do DIY this still seems like a rational idea. Just get in while the dollar is strong!

All the best, Shane
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Old 22-10-2010, 03:50   #5
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I do not want to tear your choice of boats apart. Without starting any opinionated debates,
Thats the thing. Many times we have had these opionated debates here and they are just opinated debates. Usually from people who have not sailed where the poster intends sailing.

In the last 2 years 3 boats I know sunk in the Pacific. None were Hunters, Jeneaus or Beneteaus.

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Old 22-10-2010, 04:16   #6
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Thats the thing. Many times we have had these opionated debates here and they are just opinated debates. Usually from people who have not sailed where the poster intends sailing.

In the last 2 years 3 boats I know sunk in the Pacific. None were Hunters, Jeneaus or Beneteaus.

Mark – I deliberately qualified my post for that exact reason. If anything the Beneteau’s seem to come out fairly unscathed in these debates. Likewise, I can’t see anything wrong with the Hunters. However, I do have a friend who is a trade qualified boat-builder who chartered a Jeaneau and loathed the thing. Even his wife was critical of it’s light displacement and motion.

Really what I am saying is that there is such a wide choice of boats in the US, why not take it slow as you advise and have a good look? If the threads poster can find a well outfitted dedicated Bluewater boat within their budget all the best to them? Seriously, the Australian coast can throw up some of the worst seas in the world.

Hopefully the Aussie dollar is only going to strengthen over the next few months so the more research they do the better? I just hope they don’t get too confused before the buck plummets.

As noted, it is also nice to look beyond the well marketed boats we Aussies are generally exposed to and see what else is out there? If I had the cash God only knows what I would end up sailing back! (no blasphemy whatsoever intended)
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Old 22-10-2010, 04:44   #7
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Opps, also forgot the keel question. I really like a traditional full length cruising keel that gives you a nice entry angle when you hit something or run aground. The other good thing is that it gives you a draught half way between. Tradition keels also trim better, so you can leave the helm to itself and also avoid broaching problems.

Yes, I went out and proved these theories. While a fisherman who witnessed my reef grounding mishap had already notified the authorities of my demise, I just simply stated, “steel hull; she’ll be right mate, no damage” and sailed off peacefully to my destination taking a bit more care to zoom in on the digital maps. I have also amused many people by turning my 28’ plus of boat into an active surfboard.

Again, each to their own!
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Old 22-10-2010, 05:06   #8
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? If the threads poster can find a well outfitted dedicated Bluewater boat within their budget all the best to them?)
Because you are preaching fear where none need exist.
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Old 22-10-2010, 05:16   #9
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As for equipment, well, you're going to need a water maker to get a boat across the ocean...
No offense, but I just can't stand it when people, well-meaning as they may be, make comments like this. You don't need a water maker to get a boat across the ocean. A water maker might be nice, but it's not a necessity.
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Old 22-10-2010, 05:38   #10
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Until I had a boat with a water maker, I agree it wasn't a necessity. Now, I would never willingly do without. It's a personal perspective.

P.
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Old 22-10-2010, 05:38   #11
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Why not kick off with something around 32 - 36 ft and spend a couple of winters in Queensland ? Maybe do a sail to Lord Howe and see how it all works out ? Can you handle 4 days in a bouncing sauna ?

Unless you plan on being at sea for 7 days plus you can get by just fine without a watermaker.

So far your thoughts are all over the place.
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Old 22-10-2010, 05:59   #12
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Hi... having read through the posts and seen things getting warm I thought I'd chime in....
Like MarkJ I'm a 'Bendy Toy Fan'... I've owned two and crossed the Atlantic West-East solo in both the 321 and 331... great boats.. and can only assume the 42+ are just as good with loads more space and pace.
The Hunters too look great, the only thing that makes me twitchy is the new rig.. no backstay.. but thats a personal thing.. owners here can tell you more as to its strength etc..
As for buying abroad.. US-Europe... yes you can ship it by sea but as shown on another thread this does not guarantee immaculate arrival... and as you say 30K is a big ouch...
Delivery Skipper and crew... that varies widely on the type of option you go for... from 3euro+/mile plus expenses, flights etc down to 1euro/mile plus expenses etc...
A Delivery Company will be high end with overheads etc, the Freelancers (Fellow Cruisers) at the low end... once again there's no guarantees... there are crap Skippers/crew in both types... and bloody marvelous ones in both..
My last delivery had been sunk by the previous delivery skipper and crew.. and that was just from France to UK.... they tied her up and walked away.. next morning the boatyard staff found her hanging from her lines with one hull barely afloat and the other submerged... go figure.
Whatever Boat and Path you choose I wish you good luck and a fun future...
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Old 22-10-2010, 06:01   #13
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Quote:
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Why not kick off with something around 32 - 36 ft and spend a couple of winters in Queensland ? Maybe do a sail to Lord Howe and see how it all works out ? Can you handle 4 days in a bouncing sauna ?

Unless you plan on being at sea for 7 days plus you can get by just fine without a watermaker.

So far your thoughts are all over the place.
Have you guys got washing machines/jacuzzis and sunken baths on board...
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Old 22-10-2010, 08:11   #14
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Until I had a boat with a water maker, I agree it wasn't a necessity. Now, I would never willingly do without. It's a personal perspective.
Exactly -- it's a personal perspective. But it's wrong to say "you're going to need a water maker to get a boat across the ocean." Because then someone who is looking for advice might think exactly that -- that you "need" one. It would have been better to say something like, "You might want to consider a water maker."

Too many times on this forum people make statements and claim things to be facts when they are only opinions. I think most people in most situations can tell when a statement is a person's opinion and not necessarily a fact. Still, it would be nice if members would make it clear if it's an opinion or fact. And, when it's a "fact," it would be nice to provide references or sources to back it up.

Just my opinion...
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Old 22-10-2010, 16:12   #15
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Because you are preaching fear where none need exist.
Seriously there are more than 3 brands of boats made in America. As above, although I do think there are better options, I really can’t see anything wrong with at least two of the ones mentioned. Then there are other “production” boats that rate.

On the keel thing I might have made a mistake of mentioning my boat is steel. The other really big factor is the gentle entry angle of the traditional cruising hulls on boats like the Island Packets (Old version pictured). Sorry, I might have been way off on the price of the Estero in the other thread. Nevertheless, these boats hold there value for a reason?

Yes, there are things called coral heads and reefs in the pacific and I would much rather hit them with a grind than a bang. People do make mistakes and not every little hazard is precisely charted. Mine did so well at a bit of coral crushing that the after the coincidental timing of a couple of incidents off Gladstone I was thinking about getting Chinese registration!

The threads posters asked about safety feature, pluses and minus and getting all those extras that usually come on well-outfitted blue water boats. All I am trying to do is provide a courteous and constructive answer. I totally admit I am an ex-fisherman who grew up around the sea and as such go for the practical before the “shiny” (as in marketed). As stated above, God only knows what I would sail home with (no blasphemy intended).
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