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Old 12-11-2010, 18:00   #106
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I just have trouble wrapping my mind around people paying more than I paid for my boat for an automated gizmo that is reliant on the electrical system to work, the failure of which could put their life at risk. I will be getting a manual water maker which produces 1.2gph.....Of course if you have the expensive automatic water maker you will probably have a manual back up....if your manual back up is more reliable than what it is backing up, why have the other to begin with
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Old 12-11-2010, 18:06   #107
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Originally Posted by BlueWaterSail View Post
I don't understand why watermakers are such a touchy issue in the context of living efficiently for extended periods. We use every other resource as efficiently as possible - wind to propel our boat and charge our batteries with a wind gen, sun to charge our batteries via solar, each one of these requires an initial investment, so why not make a reasonable investment in drawing a realistic amount of potable water from the ocean that carries us on our journey. It's really quite simple, and not worth all the heated discussion.

BWS
I agree it's weird. Because it's a fairly costly investment it appears that people who decide to get one are 'soft' cruisers, somehow not the real deal.

Some critics even come up with dumb stuff like "...what if it breaks down?" Well, guess what?..we'll use the water in the tanks like everyone else until we've repaired it.. or "... I'd rather build in extra tanks". Go for it. It's a solution, but do you really want all that additional weight just in case you may need it, perhaps, one day...?

If you can afford a water maker and choose not to have one, that's cool, some folk choose not to have an engine even.
But if you're knocking them because you're too lazy or dumb to earn enough to buy one, or even make one... get a life!

Much of the appeal of the cruising life is freedom and independence. I for one don't want to be forced into marinas to get water, or have to buy it, or trust it's not dodgy quality, or hump gerry cans in and out of dinghies.

I want to climb into bed and know I'm in the single bunk because I've been a mean, chauvenistic bastard, not because my partner can't stand the smell of me, or I her...

I think I've just worked out why there are so many solo sailors out there... not enough goddam watermakers
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Old 12-11-2010, 19:00   #108
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I think I've just worked out why there are so many solo sailors out there... not enough goddam watermakers
Hey! I love sailing solo and I have a water maker too. For that matter I make something that somewhat resembles water myself.
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Old 12-11-2010, 20:15   #109
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I would say a good sense of proportion and sense of humor are absolutely essential. People get hung up on the equipment a lot. When I was 9, I started my commercial fishing career in Alaska, and made my first equator crossing on the pacific side under sail for Tahiti when I was 17, and there was a lot of big water in between, and when things got scary my Father would always say "Son the boat will always take more abuse than the people on it." , he also said "There is no better bilge pump than a scared man with a 5 gallon bucket." and at 52 looking back, I have to say both of those things are true. When we sailed from Alaska to the south Pacific, we did not have much sailing experience, we learned celestial navigation on the way, by the time we got to Seattle the whole crew could get a fairly accurate fix. No water makers, no gps, we did have SSB, & VHF, the one thing we really could have used was solar panels & wind generators, just so we wouldn't have to start the engine for an hour a week to rechage the batteries. Once one becomes accostomed to the quiet of sailing, it really chafes to run the engine. Our luxuries were reading lights and a tape player in the aft cabiin with a really limited slection of music, which we quit listening to after awhile because it died. What really helps is taking good care of your equipment and keeping your wits about you and being alert and aware of your surroundings. Experience is what you gain when you survive your mistakes. And yes I grew up to be one of the long keel, sextant people, I also carry a gps, and I always back up my gps with a noon sight whenever conditions permit. I am with Wolfenzee less is more. Don't forget to look at Swans, C&Cs, or (My favorite) Skookums.
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Old 12-11-2010, 20:37   #110
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My first "blue water" cruise was in a boat that had no power (couldn't get a part for the Perkins alternator in Bermuda) so we had no power at all. But with sextant and dead reckoning we were able to keep spot-on the whole way (3 fixes from passing freighters confirmed that). My boat (designed 1949 launched 1972) came with few upgrades from the original equipment (propane cook stove vs coal cook stove etc). The Radar and high-end VHF are more safety equipment, and yes I do have electronic charts and GPS. For me I find more comfort in choosing a manual alternative over and electronically based and/or electrically powered component.
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Old 12-11-2010, 23:02   #111
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Hey! I love sailing solo and I have a water maker too. For that matter I make something that somewhat resembles water myself.
Don't ruin the theory.... well, you already have by having a watermaker.

Must be your personality... hop on the couch, close your eyes... now think back to when you were a little boy... wetting the bed...
"You wastefull little bastard... Don't you know there are solo sailors out there that would kill to have that much water to bath in...?"

I need a boat
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Old 16-11-2010, 00:20   #112
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anyone besides me notice that the person that started this thread has only made 4 posts total on this forum, yet, this is post #112 on her thread??
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Old 16-11-2010, 01:35   #113
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Originally Posted by captain58sailin View Post
I would say a good sense of proportion and sense of humor are absolutely essential. People get hung up on the equipment a lot. When I was 9, I started my commercial fishing career in Alaska, and made my first equator crossing on the pacific side under sail for Tahiti when I was 17, and there was a lot of big water in between, and when things got scary my Father would always say "Son the boat will always take more abuse than the people on it." , he also said "There is no better bilge pump than a scared man with a 5 gallon bucket." and at 52 looking back, I have to say both of those things are true. When we sailed from Alaska to the south Pacific, we did not have much sailing experience, we learned celestial navigation on the way, by the time we got to Seattle the whole crew could get a fairly accurate fix. No water makers, no gps, we did have SSB, & VHF, the one thing we really could have used was solar panels & wind generators, just so we wouldn't have to start the engine for an hour a week to rechage the batteries. Once one becomes accostomed to the quiet of sailing, it really chafes to run the engine. Our luxuries were reading lights and a tape player in the aft cabiin with a really limited slection of music, which we quit listening to after awhile because it died. What really helps is taking good care of your equipment and keeping your wits about you and being alert and aware of your surroundings. Experience is what you gain when you survive your mistakes. And yes I grew up to be one of the long keel, sextant people, I also carry a gps, and I always back up my gps with a noon sight whenever conditions permit. I am with Wolfenzee less is more. Don't forget to look at Swans, C&Cs, or (My favorite) Skookums.


Awesome post – use a few more paragraphs and it would make a fine book!
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Old 16-11-2010, 01:38   #114
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anyone besides me notice that the person that started this thread has only made 4 posts total on this forum, yet, this is post #112 on her thread??
Maybe they are too busy researching the boats they proposed @ 4 # while the rest of us continue the debate?
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