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Old 22-10-2008, 21:31   #1
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cost no object... neither to buy or maintain - what mono would you have any why?

if you didn't have to pay for any part of it - EXCEPT the CREW.... meaning this has to be something you could sail well shorthanded (no 200' clippers, 'mkay?)

so, what would you have?
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Old 22-10-2008, 22:59   #2
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Probably something like a Shannon 42 ketch. It's pretty, solid, and about at the limit of what I'd want to shorthand.
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Old 22-10-2008, 23:46   #3
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This would be very high on my list
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The only issue is I would much prefer a smaller boat. 28'-33'.
This would be another choice, but I prefer wood
Sailboats - 1985 33' ft Hans Christian 33 cutter - Dinghy (Sail) - Cadiz, ES - UsedBoats.com
As far as I am concerned, the perfect boat for one or two people is a wooden double ender, around 28'-33', cutter rigged, minimal electronics, and systems. good midship sea berth, aft cockpit, tiller steering. I prefer teak decks. The maintenance never bothered me, I like the look, and the feel. Downside is they always seem to leak, but I can live with that. Must be carvel planked. I do not like strip planks. Too hard to make repairs in my opinion. Spliced rigging, no fittings. I prefer the Sayes wind vane in principal. (I have not cruised with one). I like the simplicity. I absolutely prefer a dedicated nav station. A forward berth with decent head room for sleeping on the hook. I could go on, but you get the idea.
If money was no object, I would build the boat I want, to fit my design requirements.
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Old 23-10-2008, 00:52   #4
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this one, San Francesco
don't know how many people it would need to sail it but i think its beautiful!
when i win lotto maybe!!
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Old 23-10-2008, 02:13   #5
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if you didn't have to pay for any part of it - EXCEPT the CREW.... meaning this has to be something you could sail well shorthanded (no 200' clippers, 'mkay?)

so, what would you have?
Ahhhh. Thursday afternoon boat dreaming. If I could cheat, I would buy the biggest thing available, sell it and pocket the cash. However what I might reasonably consider, shopping in my neighborhood.

BTW - Who pays maintenance and mooring fees?

Swan 53 - Swans are oh so pretty

Swan 68 - A bigger Swan has to be prettier, right

Warwick 60 - Anyone notice a racer/cruiser pattern here?

Benneteau 523 - Probably a more logical boat

The above may not be single handed easily but small crew could work.

And of course if money were no object I would get two monohulls
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Old 23-10-2008, 09:56   #6
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My turn:

Cost no object but slightly reasonable (in both cost and size): J/160 (53' LOA, around $600k)



The the veryveryveryvery top end of my budget, and only if I find an agressive seller: J/46 (46' LOA, $450k, though I've seen less)



And totally unrealistic, because I'd feel like a target (and I'd need a dreger in the Bahamas): J/65 (65' LOA, $1M++?)



And last, and most relistic (if i can find a way to make a scuba compressor fit!) the J/42. Stunning lines, perfect size, though from a practical standpoint I'm not a huge fan of that style transom. (42' LOA, $250k)



Yes, I know I'm a bit of a J Boat fanboi - what can I say? I think they're beautiful, well built and they sail wonderfully. I really appreciate the space on the Island Packets and the beauty of the wooden boats, but in the end, while you spend a lot of time in port/marina/hook, etc, you still need to get there, and I'd like to enjoy that process in a swift manner. To me saving a few days on a long passage means a lot.
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Old 23-10-2008, 10:02   #7
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Some of what Kai said...

A Bristol Channel Cutter-type, about 30 feet, gaff rigged and with a bowsprit of dimensions to frighten shiny plastic boat owners. (I could go on at length about the rigging bits, but the people who would understand are in the choir, and those who don't aren't interested in the sermon.) The important measurement is displacement, and I'd want this boat to tip in around 7-8k kg (16-18k pounds.)

But I still want it in fibreglass. Because even if the maintenance is all paid for, done by professionals, it's still costing me cruising time.

The size is chosen for the same reason: it's easier to manage to and from the dock. So I'm more likely to just go do something. Which important because the rig does the opposite (when I get tired of pulling strings I'd re-rig with a low-aspect bermudan with power everything, or a computer-driven chinese junk.)

Oh, external lead ballast.
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Old 23-10-2008, 10:14   #8
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this one, San Francesco
don't know how many people it would need to sail it but i think its beautiful!
when i win lotto maybe!!
Looking at her rig (staysail schooner, gaff main) she could very cautiously be managed with a crew of three, possibly two if there's a good autopilot/vane steering system. Best to have 4, so two full watches.

Surprised not to see a main topsail.
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Old 23-10-2008, 10:55   #9
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A Bristol Channel Cutter-type, about 30 feet...
Ditto, although I’d probably stay with the more familiar (to me) Marconi rig… something about around 7-9 tons… set up for two, single-handleable with easy…
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Old 23-10-2008, 11:08   #10
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Price, maintenance and cruising budget unlimited for a monohull with two people intended for crossing oceans?

An Oyster 56 or 62 or a Hylas 54.
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Old 23-10-2008, 11:18   #11
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I'm with Dave, Oyster 62. Big enough to go anywhere, small enough to single hand.
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Old 23-10-2008, 11:27   #12
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Send a message via Yahoo to gonesail
nordhavn 57

this one won't complain too much when the going gets tough

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Old 23-10-2008, 12:09   #13
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Well, I kind of like the boat I just bought, which is a "stitch and glue" rendition of the Bristol Channel Cutter: 28.5 ft, 13,000 lbs, full keel with a modified rudder to improve handling. She's pretty well equipped and ought to be able to go just about anywhere. For singlehanding I'd install a boom furler and an electric primary winch (I'm not getting any younger), and for long-term cruising I'd add a few gizmos like a wind generator, watermaker, freezer and a cockpit shower.

Now the admiral would prefer something a bit larger, maybe something along the lines of a new Valiant 42, ketch rigged. I also like the new Island Packet 460 and the Morris 46, although with a sloop or cutter of that size you become too dependent on mechanical aids for singlehanding. The more complex a system is, the more likely it is to fail.
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Old 23-10-2008, 13:14   #14
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A Nigel Irens design like the Maggie B, that sadly was destroyed in a fire at the Covey Island yard, just before a major refit was finished.
She circumnavigated the world.
Old style looks with the latest materials and underwater lines...

Alan
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Old 23-10-2008, 18:23   #15
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Known boats...

Sad to hear about the Maggie B, which I've casually lusting after since it was first cover in a boating magazine... (wooden boat?)

Curmudgeon, yours too, from the moment I first read about it. Used to live within bicycling distance of Devlin's place, and never got up the courage to go visit.


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