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Old 19-11-2012, 19:11   #16
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

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No, I actually misquoted him. This is about servicing of the engine (changing the filters etc.), not rebuilding it.
Ok, that makes perfect sense.

One of the first things I did to our new to us boat was to do the oil/fuel filters, change the oil, belt, impeller, and all the hoses. I bought three of everything to also build up the spares stock to keep on hand while I was doing this.

Your looking at roughly 3-4 hours labor if you have oil, impeller, belts, hoses, filters changed. Add to that the cost of antifreeze, oil, and all the other pieces.....I'd venture to guess you'd be around $600. 300-400 labor, and the hoses and filters add up more quickly than you'd expect.
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Old 19-11-2012, 19:16   #17
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

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Ok, that makes perfect sense.

Your looking at roughly 3-4 hours labor if you have oil, impeller, belts, hoses, filters changed. Add to that the cost of antifreeze, oil, and all the other pieces.....I'd venture to guess you'd be around $600. 300-400 labor, and the hoses and filters add up more quickly than you'd expect.
Thanks, so this is $600+$400 = $1000 in total? Is there any way to get the engine surveyed and serviced at the same time, meaning to be more cost effective?
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Old 19-11-2012, 19:21   #18
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

I would expect the total to be around $600 if you tell them exactally what you want done and the engine model and serial number. Otherwise the time would go up as the mechanic would need to go to the boat, get some information, do some part chasing, then come back.

It might save a little bit of money to have it done during the survey, but not much other than travel time.
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Old 19-11-2012, 19:24   #19
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

Tenedos... suggest your first step along with survey before you purchase is to have an oil analysis done on the engine. Quick, relatively inexpensive and can turn up problems without having to tear the engine down. Cheers, Phil
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Old 19-11-2012, 19:39   #20
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

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You should check out a west coast chart and talk to a few folks who have made the trip. There are a number of spot to hide out if the weather kicks up beyond your comfort level. There is a small little bay sheltered from the crappy weather you usually find around Point Conception where you can wait out bad weather just before you turn north around the Point. Once you make the rounding which might be at night, Morro Bay is just a short jaunt north but entrance can be problematic due to fog. Another little spot to hide out from NW wind and swell is the Bay off San Simeon. These are just a few examples if you want to sneak up the coast. From there up to Monterey is only about 150 miles as I recall.
I've made delivery trips north from SoCal many times at all times of year as well as south from the PNW and as long as you watch and wait for the weather window, no drama.
You should have a good radar, a couple of serviceable GPS units, a chart plotter or paper charts with the ability to do dead reckoning and chart a course, preferably both, a knot log that works reliably and the time to sit out poor weather.
Your boat should be in good nick as well as the engine and sail inventory. A respected marine surveyor should help you with that. Make certain you have lots of extra fuel filters as well. Don't trust the PO to tell you the tanks are clean. Would be a good idea to fill your tanks and polish the fuel before setting out.
Don Lucas' suggestion is a good one if you are a little short on experience offshore. A licensed skipper can teach you a lot on the trip north and add to your sea needed for further sailing qualification. Sorry, I'm retired...
On another post thread, I related a tale about a late 70's/early 80's Catalina 30 or 32 that was not up to the trip north of San Francisco and ended up in Humbolt Bay after a rather terrifying trip around Cape Mendocino. The vessel was not up to an offshore passage and had delaminated along the starboard hull/deck joint for about 8 feet forward of the mast. Took on a fair bit of water but the made it into port. Make sure your surveyor knows where you plan on taking her if you indeed plan to exercise the sail option... cheers, Phil
Ventura, Santa Barbara, Gov't Point, Morro Bay, San Simeon, Pt Sur, Monterey, Santa Cruz, Half Moon Bay, SF Bay.

Typically it is best to round Pt Conception late night/early morning. The longest stretch is San Simeon to Monterey as the holes are minimal. Make sure you have good weather windows for each stretch otherwise get safe and go to a safe anchorage.
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Old 19-11-2012, 19:51   #21
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

I vote for sailing it up.
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Old 19-11-2012, 20:38   #22
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

We experienced sailors tend to advise sailing purchase to her new home port, because we have the confidence of a good knowledge base to correct most problems on the delivery.

However, for a new, cautious owner like yourself, who is buying a 25 year old boat, it may not be the best advice.

The key questions for you to consider in choosing Truck vs Sail delivery are:
  1. Survey report on whether vessel is ready for Sea? (and what it will take)
  2. Your Time Management if adverse weather or repairs cause numerous delays.
  3. Compare the technical support you have at home versus what you can find in LA, to make your yacht seaworthy.
Just remember, a delivery captain may or may not have the technical expertise to solve major equipment failures, so if on a daily rate, you can be exposed to expensive delays.

Also, it is not a big deal, removing/replacing the mast rigging and does give you the opportunity to inspect in detail the condition of 25 year old mast fittings.

At the end of the day it is a gut feeling based on which feels most practical at this stage of your learning process and acquisition.
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Old 19-11-2012, 20:40   #23
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

Great suggestions, Lojanica... I was just trying to hit a few spots close to PC which can always be a bit of a test to round. Your correct in my experience, dark 0100 or a bit later is the best time to round north or south. Easy to spot the oil rigs if there isn't any fog... cheers, Phil
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Old 19-11-2012, 20:46   #24
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

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We experienced sailors tend to advise sailing new purchase to her new home port, because we have the confidence of a good knowledge base to correct most problems on the delivery.

However, for a new, cautious owner like yourself, who is buying a 25 year old boat, it may not be the best advice.

The key questions for you to consider in choosing Truck vs Sail delivery are:
Survey report on whether vessel is ready for Sea? (and what it will take)
Your Time Management if adverse weather or repairs cause numerous delays.
Compare the technical support you have at home versus what you can find in LA, to make your yacht seaworthy.

Just remember, a delivery captain may or may not have the technical expertise to solve major equipment failures, so if on a daily rate, you can be exposed to expensive delays.

Also, it is not a big deal, removing/replacing the mast rigging and does give you the opportunity to inspect in detail the condition of 25 year old mast fittings.

At the end of the day it is a gut feeling based on which feels most practical at this stage of your learning process.
Thanks Pelagic, great points. I indeed agree with you, what is described as straight-forward here by many experienced sailors is far from straight-forward for me and might even be lethal if Murphy decides to intervene. I do know this very well from my other life experiences where I happen to be the subject matter expert. What is trivial to you might be the most complex for another.

Assuming, I get a good survey and engine report attesting to boat's capability to make a coastal passage to SF Bay, plus hiring an experienced captain and experienced crew, the idea of sailing sounds more appealing to me. I think I can end up learning a lot more from this trip, which makes it worth the extra effort. But much will depend boat's actual state to be in real good shape (and my offer being accepted for it). Keeping fingers crossed!
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Old 19-11-2012, 21:01   #25
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

Tenedos, Good luck on your purchase. WIth a good survey, an experienced delivery captain can handle many of the issues that may arise while sailing her home. I think this would be a great investment. With the right skipper, you could learn a lot about your boat in short order. Everything has to be in place, but you have a ready made adventure here and crash course in coastal passagemaking. Of course, you only want this 34 if it is the right boat... Plenty of good boats out there. Keep us posted on your progress-
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Old 20-11-2012, 10:39   #26
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

I delivered a number of boats, both up and down the California coast in the 80s and 90s. The winter deliveries were not bad at all except for the cold. I would recommend that you have a third hand ,so that the night watches can be reasonably short. Also if you or the Captain get seasick, you dont end up being single handed. There is much less fog in the winter and the winds are generally lighter. Make sure your ground tackle is up to snuff and enjoy the trip. There are several places to anchor between Cojo ( just below Conception) and Monterey. Port San Louis, Morro Bay(go to Yacht Club or marina) San Simion(anchorage) Pfeiffer Cove(just below Point Sur). They are all good places if the wind is out of the NW. I would also recommend strapping enough fuel jugs on deck to make the trip nonstop if conditions are just right, although I always liked to get a good nights sleep somewhere on the trip. Buy a paper chart and a Coast pilot and do some planning. Even if the delivery costs you as much as trucking, you will gain invaluable experience from the trip.____Best of Luck____Grant.
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Old 20-11-2012, 11:09   #27
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

+1, gjordan... great advice. not having a chart handy and age working its wonders on my memory, Coho was the bay just below Point Conception I was trying to recall. Also, good suggestion about ground tackle which I has neglected to include in my suggestions. Phil
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Old 20-11-2012, 21:47   #28
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

I learned the little used anchorages on the Calif coast from talking to commercial fishermen. I anchored at one other place on the Big Sur Coast, and I believe it was just under Piedras Blancas, but I am not sure. The Coast Pilot would say if it is good or not. Pfeiffer Cove became a regular stop if the timing was right. It was always better than getting the stuffings beat out of you by Point Sur in the afternoon. Just for reference, I got beat up by Point Sur more times than Point Conception. My mention of ground tackle was in my remembering a beautiful 38 foot wood boat almost going on the rocks becouse no one had safety wired the anchor shackle. Luckley it was just before dark and one of the crew noticed they were way to close to the rocks and they picked up their nylon and chain and no anchor! They motored around for a while and put another anchor down much further out. Little things can be costly._____Grant.
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Old 20-11-2012, 21:52   #29
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

There are so many Catalina 34s in SF Bay I can't imagine why you'd want to buy one in LA. Seriously. Get a copy of Latitude 38, and check the classified section. If there's not one available this month, there will certainly be one soon.
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Old 20-11-2012, 22:15   #30
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Re: Cost and Intricacies of Boat Transport

Note to the newbie: The California hideouts that posters mention are indeed popular and reasonably good. However without exception they are for hiding from the prevailing NW'lys. All (Cojo, Pt. Arguello, San Simeon, Port San Luis, Morro Bay, Wreck Beach, even Santa Cruz) can become dangerous or useless in a winter storm (hurricane force SW'lys). I think Monterey and Half Moon Bay are the only all-weather ports of refuge between Santa Barbara and SF. Fortunately winter SW'lys are easy to predict, forecast well in advance, thus easy to avoid on such a short trip.
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