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Old 30-12-2012, 08:44   #1
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Compression Post Hunter 336

Can anyone tell me where I might find the weep or drain holes at the bottom of my compression post on a Hunter 336? There is a thru bolt that is pretty much corroded in place but other than that I can find no place for the water to drain. When it really rains the post fills with water and then overflows at the top where the mast electronic wires exit. Thanks-Rod, a new member living aboard in SW FL
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Old 30-12-2012, 08:52   #2
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Re: Compression post Hunter 336

I don't know your boat, but the deck stepped boats I've seen have the weep hole at the bottom of the mast on the deck. The hole in the deck for the wires is caulked or dammed to keep the water from coming into the cabin.

I'd start by looking for a blocked weep hole in the mast on deck.

John
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Old 30-12-2012, 13:44   #3
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Re: Compression post Hunter 336

Thanks John. I have looked and looked again but can find no drain holes at the bottom of mast. It seems from what I read on here that the design is made to drain down inside the compression post and then into the bilge. But as noted I can't find any drain holes there either. I'm stymied.
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Old 30-12-2012, 14:09   #4
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Re: Compression post Hunter 336

Any ideas here seem to match your problem?

336--Leaks after Irene - SailboatOwners.com
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Old 30-12-2012, 14:32   #5
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Re: Compression Post Hunter 336

In the deck stepped boats that I am familiar with there is no (intended) means for water to get from the bottom of the mast to the compression post. There is a mast step (usually metal) and the (hopefully reinforced) deck in between mast and post. Thus there is no drain hole in the post because there is never supposed to be water there!

So, I wonder how the water is getting into the post? I would be concerned about the integrity of the deck in way of the step.

Cheers,

JIm
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Old 30-12-2012, 14:51   #6
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pirate Re: Compression Post Hunter 336

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
In the deck stepped boats that I am familiar with there is no (intended) means for water to get from the bottom of the mast to the compression post. There is a mast step (usually metal) and the (hopefully reinforced) deck in between mast and post. Thus there is no drain hole in the post because there is never supposed to be water there!

So, I wonder how the water is getting into the post? I would be concerned about the integrity of the deck in way of the step.

Cheers,

JIm
I'll second that... drop your mast and check the step and deck..
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Old 30-12-2012, 16:06   #7
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Re: Compression Post Hunter 336

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cate View Post
In the deck stepped boats that I am familiar with there is no (intended) means for water to get from the bottom of the mast to the compression post. There is a mast step (usually metal) and the (hopefully reinforced) deck in between mast and post. Thus there is no drain hole in the post because there is never supposed to be water there!

So, I wonder how the water is getting into the post? I would be concerned about the integrity of the deck in way of the step.

Cheers,

JIm
Yes..If the cabin top is in-dented at the step and there is a hole for a wire to exit(that has been drilled out)around the step this (obvious)would allow water to acummulate..I mention this because I saw it on a boat once..mine!..good luck
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Old 18-01-2013, 13:55   #8
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Re: Compression Post Hunter 336

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Originally Posted by Rod T View Post
Can anyone tell me where I might find the weep or drain holes at the bottom of my compression post on a Hunter 336? There is a thru bolt that is pretty much corroded in place but other than that I can find no place for the water to drain. When it really rains the post fills with water and then overflows at the top where the mast electronic wires exit. Thanks-Rod, a new member living aboard in SW FL
There isn't one. Water isn't supposed to get into the compression post, and so they didn't design a way for it to drain. In fact, the H336 originally came with a cast iron counterweight inside the post that was attached via a pulley at the top of the compression post to the dinette table, in theory making it easier to adjust the height of the table by offsetting its weight. But water does get into the post, and almost all of those iron counterweights rusted and swelled and stopped working and were most likely removed. Water enters the mast through the various line fairleads and wiring penetrations, and there's nothing you can do to stop it. Once in the mast, it's supposed to collect in the mast step and drain out a weep hole in the front of the step. Most people don't think about keeping this hole cleaned out or don't know it's there, and so water backs up inside the mast. Look at the front of your mast step and you'll see it. The wiring inside the mast passes through a vertical stub of 1" PVC pipe about an inch and a half tall. Their thinking was that this would prevent water from entering the compression post, because the weep hole in the step would keep the water in the mast from getting this deep. Once the water level in the mast step is high enough, it overtops the stub of pipe and flows into the compression post. It makes things worse if there's no loose overhand knot in the wiring before it passes through the pipe to act as a drip loop. If it's not there, the water in the mast can just ride the wiring right through the cabin top.

Things you can do:
1. Take a pipe cleaner and clean out the mast step weep hole.
2. Drill another weep hole on either side of the mast. You'll have to drill through both the mast and the collar of the step.
3. Drill a weep hole in the base of the compression post (a PITA to do on a curved stainless steel surface).
4. Make sure you have a drip loop in your mast wiring. Hard to do without pulling the mast, but I've seen where some people have cut an oval access hole in the side of their mast to access the wiring. Not sure that's something I'd be comfortable with though.
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Old 18-01-2013, 15:10   #9
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Re: Compression Post Hunter 336

Quote:
Originally Posted by robertsapp View Post
There isn't one. Water isn't supposed to get into the compression post, and so they didn't design a way for it to drain. In fact, the H336 originally came with a cast iron counterweight inside the post that was attached via a pulley at the top of the compression post to the dinette table, in theory making it easier to adjust the height of the table by offsetting its weight. But water does get into the post, and almost all of those iron counterweights rusted and swelled and stopped working and were most likely removed. Water enters the mast through the various line fairleads and wiring penetrations, and there's nothing you can do to stop it. Once in the mast, it's supposed to collect in the mast step and drain out a weep hole in the front of the step. Most people don't think about keeping this hole cleaned out or don't know it's there, and so water backs up inside the mast. Look at the front of your mast step and you'll see it. The wiring inside the mast passes through a vertical stub of 1" PVC pipe about an inch and a half tall. Their thinking was that this would prevent water from entering the compression post, because the weep hole in the step would keep the water in the mast from getting this deep. Once the water level in the mast step is high enough, it overtops the stub of pipe and flows into the compression post. It makes things worse if there's no loose overhand knot in the wiring before it passes through the pipe to act as a drip loop. If it's not there, the water in the mast can just ride the wiring right through the cabin top.

Things you can do:
1. Take a pipe cleaner and clean out the mast step weep hole.
2. Drill another weep hole on either side of the mast. You'll have to drill through both the mast and the collar of the step.
3. Drill a weep hole in the base of the compression post (a PITA to do on a curved stainless steel surface).
4. Make sure you have a drip loop in your mast wiring. Hard to do without pulling the mast, but I've seen where some people have cut an oval access hole in the side of their mast to access the wiring. Not sure that's something I'd be comfortable with though.
G'Day all,

Robert, thanks for posting some real info here! Your description shows just how the water can get where no water should ever be. What a bad design! I suspect that this is one of those cases where a desire to look good has overcome normal shipwrights practices for getting mast wiring below decks.

Shame on Hunter...

Cheers,

Jim
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