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Old 04-03-2014, 05:05   #1
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Comparisons

Hey, all!

We are getting ready to move up in size from a 22 foot sloop to something with a little more room to spread out in. Right now, there are two boats we are considering. One is a little step up to a 1979 27 foot Newport. Looks to be in fine condition. The other is a much larger step up, a 1980 Young Sun 35 footer.

Our sailing plans are to cruise the great lakes during the summer months for a few years and then, after retirement, cruise the eastern seaboard and beyond. Obviously, the Newport would probably be an interim boat until we could get THE boat. The Young Sun would probably be the last sailboat we would ever buy.

Financially, the Newport would be easily doable. The Young Sun would take a little budgeting.

We're leaning more towards the larger boat but I wondered what you lot would do?

Cheers,

Seadogg
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Old 04-03-2014, 06:00   #2
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Re: Comparisons

I would bet the responses will mirror the size of the boat that a poster has. Those of us with a 40'+ boat is of course going to say get the larger boat. Those with smaller will insist that the smaller boat is big enough.

So for me I say get the 35' boat, but that is still a smaller boat.
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Old 04-03-2014, 06:27   #3
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Re: Comparisons

It sounds to me that "after retirement" isn't a long way off...

Unless you want to refit 2 boats because you think you want to go bigger... And have to do this all over again... Buy the bigger one now.... Don't know the Young Son hardly at all... looks like a good seaworthy design, but LOTS... and LOTS... of wood to maintain...

There's a bazzillion affordable boats in that 33-36 foot range...
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Old 04-03-2014, 06:28   #4
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Re: Comparisons

I'd go for the bigger boat if it saved me multiple boat transactions, but not if the budget was so tight that I could not enjoy said boat for fear of financial ruin brought about by the failure of any one critical component.

I have heard people claim to have come out of the buying/selling process better off than they started but I would think they were in the minority. Mostly people seem to spend a fair bit initially getting the new boat right for them.

This, at least, was the logic we took in jumping from 20 feet to 42 feet, early days, but no regrets so far. (Aside from the rather steep learning curve, vastly assisted from time to time by CF members.)

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Old 04-03-2014, 06:50   #5
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Re: Comparisons

The 27' boat will be fine for cruising the lower Great Lakes as harbors are relatively closely spaced. The reason I bring this up is that the boat's speed is proportional to the waterline length. Longer boats = faster boats = shorter passages.
You haven't mentioned that prices of the 2 boats you are considering, but I would expect that the Newport is under $15K and the YS is quite a bit more $$.
My advice is to be conservative, learn to manage a boat bigger than your 22 footer, and then move up to an ocean going boat when your experience, time, and finances allow. The YS will be VERY expensive to own.
Other posters have mentioned that there are A LOT of well priced boats in the 30-35' range (especially in your area.) Look at a bunch before you buy.
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Old 04-03-2014, 07:25   #6
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Re: Comparisons

More info about your cruising plans might help with the advice, but unless you're driven to get the bigger boat now (have money now, but won't later), or have a need for greater creature comforts, I'd recommend getting the 27-footer now.

My reasons:
  • While a 27-footer will be small, it's still big enough to be a real cruising boat. Assuming you have standing head room, a real galley, electrical and plumbing systems, then it has everything a larger boat has, just smaller and more compact.
  • A 27-footer will be OK for the Great Lakes most of the time. Lake Superior would pose the greatest challenge, but even here it would be fine as long as you are careful.
  • Experience with this boat will teach you want you really need/want in your final cruising boat. It may turn out that you know what you want, but there's nothing like actual experience.
  • A 27' boat will be considerably cheaper to operate than a 35 footer.
My history (just so you can see where this advise is coming from):
  • I sail the Great Lakes; mostly Lake Superior and Lake Huron (North Channel).
  • I started my big-boat sailing using a friend's 22-footer, and then move onto his 26-footer. I then bought a 34-footer, and after seven years of experience bought our current, and I expect our final, boat; a 37-footer.
  • While regret is too strong, if I had to do it over I would purchase a 26 to 30 footer first; something solid, inexpensive, and simple, but one with all the standard cruising-boat systems. Smaller boats tend to be easier and cheaper operate. I believe I would have done more day-sailing with a smaller boat compared to my largish 34-footer. And I would have saved money.
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Old 06-03-2014, 15:03   #7
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Re: Comparisons

Thanks for the input! Very appreciated. The thing that is making this a little more difficult is that the price difference IS do-able. The YS would be a little more than twice the price than the Newport. Also, I have checked out marina prices and such and, really, insurance and mooring would only be about $1000.00 more for the larger boat.

Ah, decisions, decisions...
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Old 06-03-2014, 16:39   #8
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Re: Comparisons

With only a couple of years to go before planning on buying the bigger boat anyway, why not just go straight for this one? If you buy the smaller boat, any savings on expenses will be eaten up most probably in getting it configured to your needs and wants. When you buy the next boat you will need to go through the same process again. We went from a 24 to 27 footer and now have a 33 footer. I don't regret having the 27 footer, but it consumed a lot of effort and resources in the couple of years we had it that would have been better applied to our current boat. I will say however, that maintenance costs do increase rather dramatically as the size of the boat increases.
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Old 06-03-2014, 19:19   #9
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Re: Comparisons

Seadogg,

Let me give you a slightly different idea. I basically agree with Mike on this, that a 27footer will seem huge by comparison to the 22. It will teach you lots, and you will be in a better position to choose the bluewater boat of your future.

Now here's the different part. Try and find a Yankee 30 in good condition. They are bluewater capable (we took one from San Francisco to Hawaii and return in 1983). For us, it was a little too inclined to sail at more degrees of heel than we found comfortable for long passages, and not quite enough storage for our tastes, and we moved to a 36 footer from it. But we did do a lot of coastal cruising in it and it was quite all right for that.

Our lives change in unpredictable ways, and for cruising long term you need a considerable nest egg, if financial security is a major value for you. People's tolerances for that type of risk vary a lot between people, but also over time those values are subject to change. So I think an easily affordable boat in the 25-30 foot range should serve you well, and set you up well for future changes.

In another thread someone suggested that you only accept a boat with one flaw, or major failing. For instance, if the sails are shot, then it should not require cosmetic work, major changes below, or a new engine. If it needs engine work, then all the rest should be in good nick. You might try a search and see if you can find the thread, 'cause he expressed it much better than I did here.

sailorboy: Tsk, tsk, and we have a 46 ft. boat, and here I am saying stay small......go figure
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Old 11-03-2014, 11:00   #10
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Re: Comparisons

A hearty thank you to all who chimed in on this thread! Greatly appreciated.

After much thought, we decided to go for the larger boat with the idea that we'd rather get something we can grow with as opposed to having to go through the process all over again. We put in our offer and it was accepted!

We've already secured our slip and now it's a matter of getting the survey done, doing the sea trial, and finalizing the deal. THEN the real fun can begin! Maintenance, sanding teak, sealing teak, varnishing teak, oh! and maybe sailing!

Now if we can just get this interminable Michigan winter to end!
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Old 11-03-2014, 11:16   #11
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Re: Comparisons

Congrats Seadogg! I'm sure you'll love her. And who knows, we may even cross wakes this year. We're leaving Lake Superior and heading south to Lake Ontario. We may duck into Michigan for a while. Always nice to run into fellow CFers.
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