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Old 21-03-2015, 14:20   #1
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Cheoy Lee Perry 41 Sloop Pros & Cons

Hello there, I am looking at a number of boats at the moment with a view to buying and there are a few Cheoy Lee Perry 41 Sloop's on the market around the world.
Is anyone able to give me the lowdown on it's pros and cons on what to look out for with the 1980 builds?
I was looking at ROC 129, which seemed to have chain plate rusting and soft deck sandwich issues.

I used to have a Pacific Seacraft Ericson 380 offshore which took me all around the UK, Europe, North Africa and across to the Caribbean. A great sailing performance and a strong safe boat. How does sailing a 1980 Cheoy Lee Perry 41 Sloop match up?

Best wishes Gee
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Old 21-03-2015, 16:49   #2
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Re: Cheoy Lee Perry 41 Sloop Pros & Cons

I have a 1981 Cheoy Lee 41 Ketch. It is not a Perry 41 or an Offshore 41.

There is a bit of mystery regarding the different Cheoy Lee 41s and info is at this link: 41 Mystery

With regards to the build of the boat, mine is a 1981 made at their yard in Kowloon, Hong Kong. The structure of the hull is thick and strong. The keel and bilge is deep and the ballast is completely encapsulated. The fiberglass tabbing of the bulkheads are still strongly attached, but the floorboards do creak, expecially while underway. The chainplates on my boat may have been replaced and are stainless steel.

Problems I have encountered: Wooden mast rot at the base of the main. It was relatively inexpensive and easy to repair in the yard with a master carpenter fixing the spruce box and penetrating it with epoxy. The original tanks are integral fiberglass and had a bit of sediment and a small access port with baffles so the entire tank cannot be cleaned. To get around this issue we have particle and activated charcoal filter so the water is potable and tastes good. Mechanical issues the previous owner encountered were the original transmission failing and not being able to replace the failed components because they are no longer available.
The electrical installation was good, but did not use tinned wire throughout. The electrical panel does not have an adequate maintenance loop to add new circuits or easy access from the back.

The deck. Yes, it's a 30 year old build. I looked at a perfectly maintained deck on a Cheoy Lee 41, Miles of View in Santa Barbara. The owner had full canvas covering and the teak caulk meticulously maintained. The deck was so perfect. Now there's my Cheoy Lee 41 where the teak caulk was dried, separated and missing. It required teak replacement or nonskid. The process of replacing damaged teak decks is very expensive and labor intensive. The deck is cored sandwich (at least on my boat) and very strong without the teak planking.
If you have specific questions please email me or comment on our boat blog at Aboard Astraea | Invest in experiences, not things
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Old 22-03-2015, 02:51   #3
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Re: Cheoy Lee Perry 41 Sloop Pros & Cons

Quote:
Originally Posted by n8kraft View Post
I have a 1981 Cheoy Lee 41 Ketch. It is not a Perry 41 or an Offshore 41.

There is a bit of mystery regarding the different Cheoy Lee 41s and info is at this link: 41 Mystery

With regards to the build of the boat, mine is a 1981 made at their yard in Kowloon, Hong Kong. The structure of the hull is thick and strong. The keel and bilge is deep and the ballast is completely encapsulated. The fiberglass tabbing of the bulkheads are still strongly attached, but the floorboards do creak, expecially while underway. The chainplates on my boat may have been replaced and are stainless steel.

Problems I have encountered: Wooden mast rot at the base of the main. It was relatively inexpensive and easy to repair in the yard with a master carpenter fixing the spruce box and penetrating it with epoxy. The original tanks are integral fiberglass and had a bit of sediment and a small access port with baffles so the entire tank cannot be cleaned. To get around this issue we have particle and activated charcoal filter so the water is potable and tastes good. Mechanical issues the previous owner encountered were the original transmission failing and not being able to replace the failed components because they are no longer available.
The electrical installation was good, but did not use tinned wire throughout. The electrical panel does not have an adequate maintenance loop to add new circuits or easy access from the back.

The deck. Yes, it's a 30 year old build. I looked at a perfectly maintained deck on a Cheoy Lee 41, Miles of View in Santa Barbara. The owner had full canvas covering and the teak caulk meticulously maintained. The deck was so perfect. Now there's my Cheoy Lee 41 where the teak caulk was dried, separated and missing. It required teak replacement or nonskid. The process of replacing damaged teak decks is very expensive and labor intensive. The deck is cored sandwich (at least on my boat) and very strong without the teak planking.
If you have specific questions please email me or comment on our boat blog at Aboard Astraea | Invest in experiences, not things
Thank you for all that concise and helpful information and the links are very helpful too.
You mentioned that your chain plates had been replaced, did you do that or had it been done before you bought her?
Is your main mast deck stepped or keel stepped?
I have come across some deck stepped masts with completely shot chain plates where they have rusted so badly that they had blown the glass resin they had been encased in. Not a good combination for putting to the test in the middle of an ocean.
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Old 22-03-2015, 08:00   #4
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Re: Cheoy Lee Perry 41 Sloop Pros & Cons

The chainplates may have been done before I purchased. The masts are deck stepped. An interesting thing about the Cheoy Lee 41 mold is that there is a fiberglass deck step area for either a ketch or a sloop, it's just the placement of the chainplates and compression post. The compression post is very solid. When we were removing the teak decks I found that on one side of the boat they cut away for sloop chainplates and then put in ketch chainplates.

On these older boats it's definitely worth a thorough personal inspection and survey to really know what is going on.

Another thing is since the bilge is so deep bilge pump access is problematic. Ours have a mechanical float switch that I found was jammed off once. Luckily there are newer switches that sense water without a traditional float switch for deep bilge pumping.
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Old 22-03-2015, 09:35   #5
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Re: Cheoy Lee Perry 41 Sloop Pros & Cons

That's really useful, thank you.
I had a feeling that the ones I had seen picture of were deck stepped, but the broker had though otherwise. This for me again puts the emphasis on the condition of the chain plates for older vessels.

Does your bilge drop into the keel itself? I know you can get sonic level sensors that eliminate the moving parts that get clogged.
Again all this things can be sorted if you know abouth them. : )
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Old 23-03-2015, 09:27   #6
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Re: Cheoy Lee Perry 41 Sloop Pros & Cons

Yes, the aft part of the bilge goes all the way down to the bottom of the keel. I suspect there is ballast down there under there and it's not the bare fiberglass.
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