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Old 28-01-2006, 18:29   #31
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Back... with pictures.









Thoughts:

It is small inside for a 30 foot boat, the cockpit is simply huge. When you hop down where the companionway used to be, from there to the next bulkhead is 6-7 feet.

There doesnt appear to be quite enough room to do a micro sized galley, as well as two bunks in the main cabin, without moving the cockpit further back.

Every piece of plywood is gone, the cockpit is barely together, in one picture you might see the bridgedeck let a foot through.

Almost all the teak is in good shape. Except for a few bits that appear dry rotted, none took a knifeblade more than an 1/8th.

I was impressed with how the cabin top was put together, all the joints were doved. The deck "beams" are in the 1x1 territory and that suprizes me, they look undersized.

Final assesment: I think that it is possible to ressurect this boat, but I question if the hull design is the right one for my purposes.

I havent completely given up on the idea, but it didnt strike me as "the one."

---

Technical questions:

The bottom paint has flaked off in some places, from the inside of the boat you can see right through the glass. What effect will UV have on polyester resin?

On the port side every chainplate has a crack in the gelcoat running down to the waterline. The port is the side exposed to sun, do you think this a probable cause?

The rudder appears to be a solid piece of mahogany, the paint below the waterline was sanded off the rudder. The rudder has dried out and the grain has seperated. How bad of news is that? I'm betting it wont swell back up to "like new."

Thanks guys,

Zach

P.S. The only boat I could poke around in out of the list was the Nor' Sea 27. Interesting boat, oddball cutaway keel!

Stopped by the rest of the yards/brokers but by a stroke of bad luck, either couldnt find them in the yard... or the key holder was out of state!
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Old 28-01-2006, 19:11   #32
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A Nor' Sea 27 could be an interesting boat for a single person or a couple. I've looked at two locally, and the asking prices can be quite high. It's also interesting that it can be trailered, if you have a capable rig.

I just read another letter in Latitude 38 about a couple who cruised for two years in Mexico in one, and now plan to do part of the East coast:

http://www.latitude38.com/letters/200601.htm

Previous letters in Latitude 38 also note it's Mexico cruising capabilities for couples who don't mind the small size.

Jim H
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Old 29-01-2006, 18:08   #33
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It appeared to be quite a stout boat. No deck flex, super thick rudder/tiller.

I'm not quite sure if I like the hull with the fake planks...

Zach
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Old 29-01-2006, 19:59   #34
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So how much will the owner of the Cheoy Lee pay you to have you haul the boat away for them?

Seriously, that looks like a traditional wooden deck structure on top of a fiberglass hull, which is something I think you should probably steer away from. They are notoriously difficult to maintain and keep leak free. Ideally, you would really want to mold a whole new deck and house in fiberglass (not just covering over the existing structure with glass). And despite that, you really would be starting with just a bare hull, as all of the existing interior (what there is of it) would have to go, and you have no deck hardware, rigging, etc...

Just my first reactions...

Regards,

Tim
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Old 29-01-2006, 23:54   #35
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A couple dollars and a few days and she'll be right as rain, yeah sure!!!!

This is not a boat that should be soldl but one that should be given away. There are thousands of hours work for a competent woodworker, rigger and mechanic to get this boat ready for see. That's not including the tens of thousands of dollars in materials and new equipment that are going to be needed.

You can rebuild the deck and cabin top and then glass over it. It will be a solid structure and, if done right, just as good as a FRP sandwich deck. The problem is the time involved. Seriously, you are looking at a year or more of full time work to bring this boat back to life. We built a Westsail from a hull and deck and it took a year of full time work and another year of nights and weekends before we could leave on our cruise. You are looking at at least as much time on this boat.

As far as the hull. FRP is translucent. You cannot judge the thickness of the hull by the amount of light coming through it. Sued Morgan over an improperly laid up hull. The areas with the most light coming through turned out to be the thickest part of the hull. Other areas that were less translucent were way thinner. The thinnest parts were opaque largely because the factory had put in a dark pigment under the gelcoat to hide the thickness.

If the underlying glass is not fractured and delaminated where the cracks are, it's probably just a gel coat problem. The fact that it is all three chain plates is a little disconcerting, however. Cheoy Lee used chopper guns in their lay up. Hull thickness could vary significantly depending on the mood and skill of the Chopper gun operator.

As far as costs, I'd expect to have way more money in this boat, by the time it's finished, than you could buy a comparable seaworthy boat. On our Westsail, we had more money in the boat within six months of starting than we could have bought a similarly equipped factory boat. When finished, we had a much better built and finished boat than a factory built boat. We also had at least $10,000 more than we could have had a factory boat for. That does not take into account our labor, btw.

If you want to build a boat, build a boat. If you want to go sailing, go sailing. Under no circumstance mix the two as you'll likely not accomplish either.

As far as a suitable boat, these are good traditional boats with all the pluses and minuses that that entails. I love them, others hate them.

Have you looked at the Allied Seawind I or II. These boats are quite inexpensive and more than adequate for long distance voyages. the Seawind I was the first FRP boat to circumnavigate, I believe. Lose the ketch rig and they are even pretty good sailors.

Aloha
Peter O.
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Old 30-01-2006, 09:30   #36
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Run away!

"If you want to build a boat, build a boat. If you want to go sailing, go sailing. Under no circumstance mix the two as you'll likely not accomplish either."

That is about as wise a bit of advice as you'll ever hear.

This boat will require an absolutely massive amount of work and probably far more $$ than you have budgeted. When you're done (as if you could ever really be DONE), you'll have a mediocre cruiser worth far less than you put into it.

I would strongly recommend you find something in good shape structurally but with cosmetic issues and perhaps needing some systems and/or rigging refreshed. There are tons of boats like that out there for well under $10K. I bought a solid Bristol 27 about 5 years ago for $4500 that I repainted and did a couple other minor jobs on and sold for $6500 a couple years later (got the racing bug and she was too slow). You COULD get a well found Alberg 30 or Tartan 30 for $15K, requiring minimal improvement, but that probably wouldn't meet your needs for a project to learn on. In any case, you really shouldn't consider a boat like this one if you ever want to actually get on the water (and have two cents to rub together)...there are just too many solid but unloved boats out there looking for a new home.

Dan
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Old 01-02-2006, 14:38   #37
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Thanks guys, passing on this one.
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Old 12-03-2006, 13:57   #38
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Hi Zach:

Been following your posts throught the different boards and thought i'd throw in my two cents.

My history. Started sailing when I was 16Whenb I turned 18 I got really serious. I raced five days a week in the summer. Lots of fun. did Sf to SD race, Sf to Catalina, Transpac, after college I did A few Cabo races and deliveries and while in Mexico met people and then sailed to Tahiti and on To Aus and NZ. This was all twnety years ago. Could never figure out why anyone would want to buy a boat when there were so many rich people who wanted there boats sailed for them.

Then all of a sudden i wanted my own boat. My Aunt was selling a Freya 39 very good blue water boat. She was going to carry the contract and give it to me for a good price. I talked to a friend and we had a partnership. then he went home and told his girlfriend that him and Charlie were going to sail around the world . >>> Never bought the boat. He has a wonderful wife and two kids >>>Mark said "It's better to work and save money then buy the boat." I've done it. With a little luck by the end of the year I'll have enough $$$ to buy a nice cruisning boat and a steady income from the rentals that I own to cruise as long as my family would want to > >> key is how long will the family want to. Before I married Beth she was all for cruising. We just wanted to have enough $$ so that we woudln't have to start over when we got back. So how long does the family (two kids 8and 9 and Beth) want to go cruising for? A week in Florida in May (a start) and they've agreed to an extended cruise of some sort (a few months) depending on where we buy the boat Baja -- Carribean -- NZ. Won't commit to a day yet though.

Anyway if I had to do it all over here's what a fellow English Major would do. Learn a trade -- Electrical is a good one. You can work on boats or work on land and there is a world wide shortage of tradesman. That way you can work your way around the world. Sail on other people's boats for awhile. Latitude 38 crew parties etc. are a good way to meet people. Decide if you still want a boat after that.

This whole time save money. If you live frugally and know a trade you can earn enough money in a couple of years to buy a decent boat. (where I live an electrician charges $35 an hour and no one bats an eye. A licecensed electrical contractor charges $75) At $50 an hour with 2000 hours a year you could have earned $100k take out taxes and living expenses (live with your parents) and you can have $50k a year in savings. Two years of this plus doing side jobs and you could have over a $100k. enough to buy a decent boat and cruise frugally for a couple of years. Knowing electrical you can probably make enough in three months to cruise for 9 months. Make sure that you put money away to start over should you get tired of sailing. Learn as much as you can about boats and then go on. By the sounds of your posts you are learning alot.

Good luck

Charlie
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Old 13-03-2006, 13:37   #39
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Thought I'd throw this into the mix...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1964-...QQcmdZViewItem
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Old 13-03-2006, 20:36   #40
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Now that boat is a bargain!!
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Old 15-03-2006, 19:12   #41
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Sure is!

I'll be watching that one... I like the idea of a boat on the west coast and bringing it around. (No time/ money for that at the moment though!)

Charlie, that is a great idea. Start doing what you plan on doing on land before you move aboard. Trial by fire approach, but certantly better to figure it out before you start.

Thanks guys,

Zach
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Old 15-03-2006, 22:02   #42
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Zach:
Before you get serious about bidding make sure that the yard bill is to be paid by the seller. If it has been sitting there for a few months or years that could be alot of money. I dont know any of the legality but I imagine there is the possibility of a mechanics lean on the boat. But it looks like a real bargain.

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Old 22-03-2006, 07:28   #43
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Zach

Did you get it?

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Old 23-03-2006, 21:06   #44
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Nope...

Decided against thinking buying anything for a while. I've been pondering it, and I think you guys are right... save save save and buy something that someone else has spent a lot of money on.

Not a very exciting plan, but a plan none the less.
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Old 23-03-2006, 21:22   #45
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Don't feel too bad, Zach.

I have been in the same boat you're in now!! It'll come to pass. And before you know it. You'll be out there buying that boat, that some else has put alot of work into. And gave up?

Just keep your head up. Time will tell?
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