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Old 24-08-2010, 00:09   #76
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A leading cause of cancer in men and you need to have it checked annually. Its called a PGA test I think.
Is that in the manual?
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Old 24-08-2010, 00:14   #77
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I'm not convinced that you need to be Joe Mechanic to cruise, especially if you can afford to hire a mechanic once a year to completely service the engine. You should be able to bleed your lines, change your fluids and filters, change the impeller and alternator, and service the packing gland. You can hire a good mechanic to walk you through all those tasks on your particular engine in a day. It will be an expensive day, but at the end of the day you'll probably feel better about cruising.
Thats exactly what I do. But could never afford the whole day - at $100 per hour!

I have used a mechanic a couple of times to change the impellor. Mine is the Yanmar series where its bahing the water pump and its a pain to change.
It takes the Yanmar man 30 minuts to do. The other 30 minutes of the hour I pay is all my questions and general check of the engine

I think its a little like a 1960's car where every owner had to know a bit about cars and the engine would splutter to a stop once per year. A new car can be run just with oil changes for 100,000kms without missing a beat.

**Touch wood!**
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Old 24-08-2010, 07:09   #78
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The age of the boat is only one factor. The other is how well maintained it has been since it was new. A 25 year old boat that has been refit and upgraded with quality equipment will almost always be in better condition than a 5 year-old boat that has been neglected, especially a "southern" boat where the UV damage to sails and rigging can occur rapidly.

And, old or new, the boat's condition will be reflected in the price unless the broker is incompetent.
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Old 24-08-2010, 07:32   #79
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Fixing things

I think if you can't fix it, or at least construct a work around, you shouldn't be out there. An event can be a minor annoyance if you can fix it or life threatening if you can't. That said, fixing it on an older simpler boat is not rocket science. If you can handle a screw driver, a big and small wrench, WD 40 and minimal epoxy, you can probably get back. And constantly think about work arounds: what would I do if the rudder fell off, the steering cable failed, a shroud gave way, a through hull popped, the fuel filter clogged? The answers to those questions are all at hand even on the most minimally supplied boat and none of them takes skill to accomplish.

That said, I also believe every member of the crew should be able to answer those questions as well.

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Old 24-08-2010, 08:01   #80
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Not if you choice a Cape Dory.

Problem is, there are no new Cape Dory's anymore...

Not if you are a competent mechanic.

New is for the rich, suckers, and/or folks you can't turn a wrench...
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Old 25-08-2010, 08:55   #81
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I don't think boat and economy belong in the same sentence. Buy a new boat and you spend your initial bit of money outfitting her. Yes, you get to skip a lot of the bigger maintenence issues up front but you will hit them eventually.

Buy an older boat and you might inherit some handy equipment but you will have more maintenence costs up front. You will also get a chance to really know the systems on your boat.

Bottom line- buy a boat because it is fit for your purposes, fits your budget and you love it. New, used YMMV.
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Old 25-08-2010, 09:29   #82
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If you want new or like-new, I've found;

Buying new is most expensive
Buying used and restoring to like-new is next expensive
Buying used and already restored to like-new is least expensive

The benefit of the middle choice is if you can enjoy the boat during restoration. The initial purchase price is lower, but the end cost is higher (but spread over more years).

Used but in like-new is the most cost-effective. Many cruisers sit virtually unused, but well maintained for decades.
I'd buy that! To me, the best choice was 4) used; restored to far-better-than-new

Bought an over-the-top restored 1968 Ohlson 38 last year. Best decision we made. Told the wife, she can look at any boat she wants, but we will be buying this one!

phpAlbum.net

phpAlbum.net

I wanted something turnkey, pretty, durable, and did I say pretty!

After seeing this boat, then going to the boat shows, I knew this was the right boat!







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Old 25-08-2010, 10:06   #83
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Phantom, that is indeed a beautiful boat. Congrats!
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Old 25-08-2010, 11:04   #84
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Phantom, if I owned 'Mildred Rose', that GORGEOUS Olson 30, then I too could die a happy man! Congratulations on your find and purchase she is trully a Bristol looking YACHT worthy of a dock space at any Yacht Club or marina. Yes, I now know what 'yacht envy' feels like,LOL!
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Old 25-08-2010, 11:11   #85
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@phantomracer - spectacular boat! Teak decks, brightwork, and a sweet hull color. Congrats on a rare find!

My mantra has always been "I want a boat I can sail and work on, not a boat I have to work on before I can sail."

You can buy some lovingly maintained vessels and some totally ignored ones. I'm of the opinion that an older, well maintained vessel is less expensive than a derelict and a big bank account.

The early years of plastic boats generally meant overbuilt, heavy, and solid thick hulls. It produced a vessel with poorer sailing performance, harder to find parts, and in some cases, lots of carpentry work. IMO, it also produced a vessel with more storage, a bit more room, and better construction. A well maintained and loved vessel will generally have fewer problems.

If you love her, then money's not a problem. If you like her, then money can be tight. If you hate her, then it's time to sell her.
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Old 25-08-2010, 11:53   #86
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@phantomracer - spectacular boat! Teak decks, brightwork, and a sweet hull color. Congrats on a rare find!

My mantra has always been "I want a boat I can sail and work on, not a boat I have to work on before I can sail."

You can buy some lovingly maintained vessels and some totally ignored ones. I'm of the opinion that an older, well maintained vessel is less expensive than a derelict and a big bank account.

The early years of plastic boats generally meant overbuilt, heavy, and solid thick hulls. It produced a vessel with poorer sailing performance, harder to find parts, and in some cases, lots of carpentry work. IMO, it also produced a vessel with more storage, a bit more room, and better construction. A well maintained and loved vessel will generally have fewer problems.

If you love her, then money's not a problem. If you like her, then money can be tight. If you hate her, then it's time to sell her.
That was pretty much my philosophy. I didn't have the time, money, or skill to restore a boat. One properly maintained/restored, IMO, is a better buy. This boat is way extreme of both (maintained and restored)! The previous owner is my MG mechanic who can make any British car dead on balls reliable. This is his (and Jamestown boat yard) workmanship.

And I liked older boats, which as you mention are generally overbuilt. The Ohlson 38 even has logitudinal stringers glassed in to make it even more sturdy!



To me it was the right boat, moderate beam, just the right length, all systsms restored/replaced. Even has a Baby Blake head! Teak Decking Systems teak deck glued down without screws/plugs.

I am somewhat handy, but the thought of buying an used boat and bringing her up to a good reliable standard was more than what I wanted to take on.
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Old 25-08-2010, 12:12   #87
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Just as an interesting aside (and it's not meant as my taking a "side"): I have talked to two delivery skippers over the years and each one said the same thing - deliveries of new boats typically present the most problems and breakdowns.
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Old 25-08-2010, 12:39   #88
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Just as an interesting aside (and it's not meant as my taking a "side"): I have talked to two delivery skippers over the years and each one said the same thing - deliveries of new boats typically present the most problems and breakdowns.

I would buy that!

Took delivery of our (please don't laugh) our Macgregor 26M in 2004. I swear it was built by drunken monkeys...we almost named the boat that!

half were dealer mishaps, other was from the factory.

motor overheated on the maiden launch! Steering linkage failed after a few trips, pin holding the spreader in fell to the deck on day! Now it is sorted, it is an awesome, even somewhat reliable, boat, but took a while to get there..

we thought buying new would rid ourselves of problems.. Nope. heard owners of other makes reporting similar issues when bought new.
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