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Old 14-02-2011, 10:10   #16
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Originally Posted by CDunc View Post
bdurham,

These are the Categories, they tell the Designer what to design for in terms of strength, stability ect.

A. OCEAN: .............
D. SHELTERED WATERS: ............
Good luck in your venture and I hope this helps you to make a more informed decission.
Thanks for posting the list.

Is there some sort of a database or listing that shows the ratings of common models? It would be of interest to me, and likely the OP and others, to understand the catagory rating of our own boats or boats being considered for purchase.

In my own case, a 1972 Morgan OI 41, I understand some compromise was made toward living accommodations and shallow draft, but I also know that many ocean passages have been made in them and that the full length keel contributes to seakindlyness.
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Old 14-02-2011, 10:10   #17
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The 2011 Hunter 39, 45DS, 45CC and the 2011 Catalinas 387 and above are all CE rated "A".

Usually if you can find the boat specification sheet that came from the manufacture, this information is listed on it.

Catalina's home page:

Yachts and boats for sale - Catalina Yachts
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Old 14-02-2011, 10:16   #18
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Thanks for posting the list.

Is there some sort of a database or listing that shows the ratings of common models? It would be of interest to me, and likely the OP and others, to understand the catagory rating of our own boats or boats being considered for purchase.

In my own case, a 1972 Morgan OI 41, I understand some compromise was made toward living accommodations and shallow draft, but I also know that many ocean passages have been made in them and that the full length keel contributes to seakindlyness.
Understand this is just one man's opinion of the Morgan O/I:

BoatUS.com: Boat Reviews by Jack Hornor, N.A. - Morgan Out Island 41

I agree with most of what he says but the boat does have it's drawbacks.
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Old 14-02-2011, 13:40   #19
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The facts are.. just about any coastal cruiser with good stability and adequate tankage will make it over at the right time of year....
The facts are, a coastal cruiser is less adequate than an ocean cruiser.

Oceans have been crossed in all sorts of floating craft, but I would steer well clear of advising anobody to pick up any boat and go.

The other factor is that we know the stories of those who did it and wrote their books. We will never know the stories of those who perished.

b.
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Old 14-02-2011, 14:16   #20
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i realize that catalina's are generally not a bluwater boat. im guessing this is because the actual rigging is not bulky and strong enough to warrant large ocean passages. Im wondering if anyone could provide information on what it would take to prepare a catalina for a voyage east to west across the pacific on the 'milk run'.
Hi Bdurham, we have done this in a Catalina 42 (as part of a family circumnavigation) and on a Catalina 470 as a couple. They are both capable of handling rough weather (see our web site www.kekada.com - past voyages). The rigging on the 470 compares very favourably to other brands. I would also be comfortable doing it in the 38. Upgrades required are the same as any other vessel ie equipment related. Cheers, Don
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Old 14-02-2011, 14:26   #21
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bdurham,

I seem to remember some talk of the seating of rudder posts, & rudders releasing from the post inside the rudder casing. Can't remember any specific year/model. Don't know if this turned out to be negligible or significant problem: might want to do a little research.

If you find enough collaborative evidence to cause concern, I'd consider wind vane gear instead of autopilot alone, and the kind that uses its own separate steering oar, instead of the type that steers by moving the yacht's rudder. This way, you have steering backup in case of failure, a smart redundancy in any case.

In addition to providing built-in steering system redundancy, a wind vane will encourage you to spend some time becoming a better sail-trimmer than an auto pilot will, which will in turn tend to discourage the habit of compensating for bad sail trim by additional rudder deflection, which side-loads the rudder and, if it indeed is weak, contributes to the rudder releasing from the post from the high levels of torque.

Fair Winds,
Jeff
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Old 14-02-2011, 15:57   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barnakiel View Post
The facts are, a coastal cruiser is less adequate than an ocean cruiser.

Oceans have been crossed in all sorts of floating craft, but I would steer well clear of advising anobody to pick up any boat and go.

The other factor is that we know the stories of those who did it and wrote their books. We will never know the stories of those who perished.

b.
Sorry Barnie..
I consider my self chastised...
Keep forgeting not everyones an egotistical ole git with a death wishhhh
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Old 14-02-2011, 16:35   #23
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;-)

Tell no more! My own brave tub probably designed for weekend / lake use.

I just want to keep the oceans for ourselves ;-)

Hugs,
barnie
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Old 14-02-2011, 16:45   #24
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These are the Catalina yachts certified in compliance with CE categorgy "A":
Catalina 30 mkIII
Catalina 310
Catalina 320
Catalina 34 mkII
Catalina 350
Catalina 36mkII
Catalina 387
Catalina 400
Catalina 42mkII
Catalina 470

It's easy to find this info on their website at: Yachts and boats for sale - Catalina Yachts
thanks this is VERY helpful!
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Old 14-02-2011, 17:22   #25
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thanks for the advice. i had a look on that catalina website. and most of there fleet is category "A" capable. im not sure if that applies to the older models or not. ill have to check. im really fond of that 36 mkII. if there is anyone who owns that boat and has any info on it, that would be helpful.
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Old 14-02-2011, 19:29   #26
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Catalina's crossing the Pacific must not be a big deal as I have known and seen anywhere from a half dozen or more each year do it. Quite a few Aussie's buy them in the USA and then sail them back to OZ-land. And they all make it just fine.
- - If you do the Pacific during the normal "milk-run" season there are few if any challenges beyond the bureaucrats at some islands. And likewise I have seen and have friends crossing the Pacific in sailboats I wouldn't take out of sight of land, and they even make it across. So really it is not that much of a challenge to the boat so long as you are not the kind of person who seeks out storms or refuses to wait for a better weather window.
actually the plan i have is to buy a catalina in a few years and sail it to australia and sell it there. ive done a bit of research about importing a boat and changing registration. and if i play my cards right i should be able to turn the boat a make a bit of a profit as the aussie dollar has gotten better in the last few years and the price of boats is high. probably close to 25% on the US price.

i wouldnt be to worried. i would be more interested in making the crossing. planning on taking about 16 months. san diego to brisbane. with plenty of detours on the way.
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Old 14-02-2011, 19:39   #27
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actually the plan i have is to buy a catalina in a few years and sail it to australia and sell it there.

probably close to 25% on the US price.
.
Based on our experience and that of a couple of others we know who have done that, I doubt that you will make a profit, maybe break even at best. You also have the 240V vs 110V to factor in as well, so as long as the plan to enjoy the trip is the major factor then go for it.
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Old 15-02-2011, 00:37   #28
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Based on our experience and that of a couple of others we know who have done that, I doubt that you will make a profit, maybe break even at best. You also have the 240V vs 110V to factor in as well, so as long as the plan to enjoy the trip is the major factor then go for it.
are there any other factors that you can think of that would be a hinderance in this plan...
ive done a bit of sailing in my time, but have yet to cross any oceans. ive thought about that 240v issue... do you know if there are any power converters that you could plug into the boat that would just be a temporary solution rather than having to rewire everything?
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Old 15-02-2011, 00:51   #29
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. ive thought about that 240v issue... do you know if there are any power converters that you could plug into the boat that would just be a temporary solution rather than having to rewire everything?
The wiring itself is not an issue - 110 requires much thicker wire than 240 - just the 110V applicances.

You can get decent sized transformers that step up/down 240/220/120/110 for a few hundred dollars but they don't convert the frequency ie 50 vs 60Hz. For many things this is okay but for some it is not.

Another way around this is to get a battery charger than can handle both inputs then have a suitably sized 110 invertor to power existing on board appliances etc. That also assumes a decent sized battery bank. As a bonus you could also add a 240 invertor if you wanted to use appliances from both countries - just be very careful in how you wire it all up.
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Old 15-02-2011, 01:17   #30
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Yes - you will probably buy a lot of gear that will be worth a very small percentage of what you paid for it.

If we take the ISAF Special Regulations as a yardstick.

To take a boat that is fully equipped to CAT3 (coastal) to CAT1 (Offshore) costs about USD30,000 (approximate costs from 1st hand experience).

When you purchase a new production boat, it will not be CAT 3 compliant - but I don't have 1st hand experience of how much this equipment would cost
There are also all the incidentals to buy: anchors, chain, dingy, outboard, sails, electronics etc etc.

How much you spend on these "additional costs" is up to you. The point is there will be significant costs in addition to the base price of the boat and these items will be a 'give away' with the boat or sold at a fraction of their worth on the 2nd hand market

Don't get me wrong - I don't think there is anything wrong with sailing an appropriate Catalina across the Pacific. I just can't see how it could ever be a financially profitable.

PS - Catalina will put in what ever power supply you want.
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