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Old 31-07-2010, 14:33   #16
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I disagree on watermakers, I think they are a great item to have. Upkeep isn't bad if you actually use it regularly. And that doesn't mean in a grungy port!
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Old 31-07-2010, 15:04   #17
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Back to the boat query --

As I recall, the main design difference between the Catalina and Yankee Yacht versions was changing from a typical S&S skeg moounted rudder to a free standing spade rudder on the C-38. Not a good change IMO. One might also wonder about differences in layup schedules, but that info is likely pretty hard to come by.

FWIW, I owned a Yankee-30 years ago, and its layup and structure (especially the hull to deck joint) was more robust than the Catalinas of its size and era.

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Manly Qld Oz
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Old 31-07-2010, 18:30   #18
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Does anyone know why Catalina 36 or 38 were not on the Mahina list? Is it perhaps the storage and skeg issues?

Yankee 28 and 30 are on the Mahina list.
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Old 31-07-2010, 18:53   #19
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Sounds like you have most of the key bases covered, Feral Cat. A good offshore liferaft, well provisioned might be a sound investment. A soft case would suffice. Good idea to have it serviced just prior to pushing off. There used to be a great little provisioning shop that specialized liferaft maintenance and repair about 4-5 kilometers north of Marina Coral in Ensenada (close to a hardware store, I recall) on the water side of the highway. It was run by off duty firemen (Bomberos) and they serviced commercial as well recreational rafts. It is also smart to have them inflate it while you are there so you know its configuration and what is in it. They used to take you down to the beach in front of their place and set off the outdated flares, a little practice is a good thing! Remember, the time to board your raft is when you have to step UP into it... cheers, Capt Phil
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Old 01-08-2010, 10:15   #20
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Catalina 38

Saltmonkey- sounds like your estimates are spot on...

I agree on a wind vane, darn, better add an additional $5,000 to to refit estimates...

Regarding a life-raft, hum, I will need to ponder this one... I really appreciate the feedback and hopefully Dennisail is adding these costs to a potential boat prior to jumping in... I for sure wish I had... Saw a perfect ocean boat yesterday while out in the harbor... Completely different from mine but appeared to have all should haves covered in boat design and stuff visible from another boat... Sure looked nice, a big (40') ketch with all the bells and whistles...Oh my!

Watermaker issues, I tend to agree with use only in clean water areas and if not able due to murky/dirty harbor type scenario then shuttle water old school...5-10 gals at a time but yes for only a couple of days max due to need of use for watermaker... but heck 40 gals is enough for at least 3-4 days use.

With the whole rudder issue, any way to overcome the lack of solid protection for the spade rudder scenario?

Many boats of this era IOR build have been refitted with some type of folding prop to facilitate a little more speed under sail... With the spade rudder fin keel situation are we better off with a fixed 3 blade prop especially in the cruiser scenario? meaning; benefits of loosing sailing speed for more efficiency under motor? Sounds like about 50% of the time will be under motor if I have listened to those who have gone forth prior...
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:04   #21
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[QUOTE=Feral Cat;495192]

With the whole rudder issue, any way to overcome the lack of solid protection for the spade rudder scenario?

QUOTE]


If you're in the camp of spade rudders suck, find another boat. Many good cruising boats have spade rudders. If this point bothers you move on.

John
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:13   #22
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Yes, the whole rudder issue is a difficult choice. There are benefits such as the "power steering" effect. There are also semi-spade rudders where part of the base is protected - not a full skeg, and not a full spade. There is a school of thought that its better to have a spade than a skeg, as a skeg ripping out of the boat will create a manhole rather than just a loss of a rudder.

In any case, whatever the rudder design - fully attached to spade - you should consider an emergency backup for a rudder.

I'm having a difficult time deciding for myself as well.
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Old 01-08-2010, 12:27   #23
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Catalina 38

Spade rudder... it is what it is...

Love my Catalina 38 and she sails well...

Just looking for ways to improve and make her MORE sea-worthy is all...

Thinking many boats of this era/IOR design might be able to use some minor tweaks to make them MORE sea-worthy... Just keeping in line with the thread.

Had given some thought to a thick stainless strap bolted/fiberglassed to the keel and then reaching to the spade rudder pivot point an attachment that allows pivoting... Basically creating a "Ghost" keel? Kinda put that one in the trash but had considered some type of an arrangement... Just to keep the safety of the leading edge of the rudder a little more safe?

Will deal with an emergency rudder when and if needed...

Sounds like there is not too much to do to these older designed boats other than storage modifications, beefing up the bulkheads, modernizing, and basic upgrades of older rigging and they should be ready to go?

Sailmonkey's estimate of $45,000 to $50,000 to do so is spot on with my experience!
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Old 01-08-2010, 12:28   #24
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If you like the Catalina 38 but not the spade rudder then look at the Hughes 38,a superior offshore design.I saw one listed recently for very a good price.I bought 79' Hughes 38, 3 yrs. ago and am reasonably happy with it.It's by no means perfect but it does the job.Almost 20k in upgrades & gear got it to the point where I felt comfortable with heading to South.
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Old 01-08-2010, 12:46   #25
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Catalina 38

Curious; with refitting seemingly a part of getting these boats ready for the big oceans, has anyone looked into modifying the sail plan to compensate for some of the IOR design builds of the era?

Ie: longer boom for the main, more broach in the current sized main or any thing like these to make them more well rounded and ocean capable and eliminate some of the previously identified problem areas like downwind on a chute?
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Old 01-08-2010, 12:57   #26
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My new North full batten main has substantial roach and the foot runs back on boom more than the old one did.Boat is fast!Wish I had put the watermaker money towards a Hydrovane though.
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Old 01-08-2010, 13:13   #27
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Catalinas are notorious for weak chainplates. This is somewhat dependent on the year , but I would check with a good rigger. whos opinion you trust , and have him check them out and reenforce them if he deems it necessary. The engine you have , if it's the rhree cylinder mitisubishi it is a nice smooth running engine but the parts are verry expenstve.You might think about boubling up on some of the spare parts that you carry.
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Old 01-08-2010, 15:12   #28
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G'Day all,

Another point about the old early IOR hull shapes...

Insatiable I is a Palmer Johnson Standfast 36, an IOR one-tonner of 1974 vintage, and very similar to the Yankee /Catalina 38 in hull shape. We cruised in her for 17 years and 86K miles, and found little problem with hull shape induced handling problems. We did add a home built auxillary rudder wind vane, and that helped with directional stability when near or above hull speed.

But, we did find that the exaggerated tumblehome was a PITA for a couple of reasons. First, it seemed to encourage boarding seas from abeam, and more importantly, it made keeping fenders in place difficult. Once away from the friendly confines of ones American marina, one sometimes must lie against rough wharves or walls, and the fenders just will not stay in place! Not life threatening, but bloody hard on the gel coat. Obviously, this isn't a deal breaker, but something we were surprised (and aggravated) by.

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Manly, Qld, Oz
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