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Old 19-10-2010, 19:52   #16
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large cockpit

I can't speak for FSmith, but the primary reason that I would consider a large cockpit as undesirable on a blue water/long distance cruiser is because a larger cockpit, if filled with water, will have a greater impact on the boat. If a breaking wave were to fill the cockpit of this boat for instance:

Bluenose 24 sailboat for sale

while the boat was simultaneously in very large/demanding conditions it could spell disaster for boat and crew.

As with everything on a boat it's a compromise and there is no single right answer. I would also prefer a smaller cockpit for the above reason so that I could have more room below decks. You will notice that some relatively large, off-shore focused boats have little more than a footwell for a cockpit.

On a similar topic, a smaller companionway with a high threshold (there may be a nautical term for this) would also be an asset for an off-shore focused boat since it reduces the risk of flooding through the companionway. Many modern cruisers will have a larger companionway that is easy to step into though for obvious reasons.

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Old 19-10-2010, 20:06   #17
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Just need a open stern......water gone

or

Add 3" drains
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Old 20-10-2010, 04:36   #18
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Makes sense and thanks for the answers!
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Old 20-10-2010, 06:17   #19
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a large cockpit is perfect for sailing to the Bahamas

1. You will spend most of your time there
2. Since there is virtually no open ocean sailing required to get there, all of the downsides cited above don't apply but if they worry you anyway, install bigger cockpit drains
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Old 20-10-2010, 06:23   #20
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Just put the drains straight out thru the stern, if there's interior transom wall just use a 3" hose to connect two flanges.

Have them exit just below the cockpit floor above the waterline .....U get the idea

It's really easy to do.
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Old 20-10-2010, 06:42   #21
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Originally Posted by scevrog View Post
My wife and I have been taking sailing for two summers now.

We want to buy a boat for coastal crusing.

We are not interested in crossing oceans, winning races, or anything like that.

However, we are at least potentially interested in coastal crusing from Canada to the Caribean. We may never venture out this far, but would at least like to have a buy a boat that could potentially do this.

We don't have the money for a top quality boat like Island Pacific.

The Catalina's seem to be up our alley for price, comfort and ease of use.

However, are they OK for longer trips hugging the coatline down to the Caribean? I know they are not the best for that, but, are they sufficiently safe and well equipped for that?

Cheers.
Let's not lose sight of the OP's question.

Based on what he's said, he's looking at motoring down the ICW, maybe some inlet hopping outside in good weather, and island hopping east when the weather permits. I don't see why he needs to be the least concerned about a large cockpit filling up with seawater. It'd take winds at Force 10 or higher to produce the waves needed to do that. Based on his cruising plans, chances of being out in that are nil.

A large cockpit is an asset when you're in a tropical anchorage having sundowners with fellow cruisers. He'll definitely need to add some fuel and water capacity, though. Can the shallow bilges handle bladder tankage? Lashing jerry jugs on deck works, but is a bit clumsy.

I don't see any reason a Catalina wouldn't be OK for this sort of cruising.
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Old 20-10-2010, 06:54   #22
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I sailed a Catalina 30 for 10 years in the Great Lakes, mostly Lake Erie, and in winds up to 50 knots and waves over 9 feet. I have also sailed fin keeled boats in the Caribbean and short stints in the open Atlantic. My wife and I are getting ready to do extended cruising along the east coast, Bahamas, and Eastern Caribbean; and we are looking for a full keeled, heavy displacement boat like Island Packet. I would not want to sail in the Catalina for more than a couple of hours in 10-12 ocean waves with 25-30 knot winds like we have seen...and I would want to have a boat that could take more weather than that, especially some of the conditions that you can encounter in the Mona Passage or the Anagada Passage. I am sure that there are many people on this site that can share their experience with those passages, both good and bad.

Just my opinion/experience...hope it helps!
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Old 20-10-2010, 07:36   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonathanSail View Post
... As with everything on a boat it's a compromise and there is no single right answer. I would also prefer a smaller cockpit for the above reason so that I could have more room below decks. You will notice that some relatively large, off-shore focused boats have little more than a footwell for a cockpit.

On a similar topic, a smaller companionway with a high threshold (there may be a nautical term for this*) would also be an asset for an off-shore focused boat since it reduces the risk of flooding through the companionway ...
As sck5 indicates, the offshore “footwell” cockpit isn’t very livable, tho’ obviously seaworthy.
For coastal & semi-protected waters (Bahamas & Caribbean), I’d opt for a more livable compromise.

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* companionway with a high threshold = bridgedeck
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Old 20-10-2010, 07:58   #24
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The Cat 320 has an open ~ 2.5' transom. If the bridge deck is not high enough then one or two of the three boards can be kept in place.

The guy will not be venturing out in 20-30 knt winds.
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Old 20-10-2010, 09:15   #25
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I think they're fine for what you're trying to do, especially if you don't push it in bigger weather.
Quite the numbers from Gords link look very similar to our Moody 31. Given a good weather forecast we have no concerns about going offshore for a passage.

This is going to be your home for several months, if its light and airy and you have sufficient room for everything, you will be fine. Huds comments about fuel and water quantities will need some thought and I would suggest you think about the heat and need for shade both whilst sailing and at anchor.

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Old 20-10-2010, 09:39   #26
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Why is it a con to have a large cockpit?
some people feel more secure in a small cockpit when the boat heels, especially if they're able to brace themselves on one sead by putting their legs against another seat. The argument has been made that a small cockpit will drain faster if the boat is pooped, but in reality large modern cockpits, especial where walk-through transomes are concerned, drain much more quickly than old-fashioned small cockpits. Look at virtually any modern offshore racer, and you'll see far larger and far more open cockpits than you'll see on something like a Catalina 32. And those are on boats specifically designed to race in offshore conditions.

there is an ever-diminishing constituency within the cruising world who feel that a proper cruiser should resemble a lifeboat with a stick stuck in it. they want narrow-hulled, full-keeled survival capsules that can be driven up on rocky reefs by Force 10 winds, pounded by storm surge for a week or two, and then be floated off the reef unscathed. The Catalina 32 is not such a boat, which means, therefore, that they don't approve of it.

The reality is that a Catalina 32 is a less able cruiser than a Catalina 34, which in turn is less able than a Catalina 36, which in turn is less able than a Catilina 42. The smaller boats won't have enough tankage or storage space to support longer voyages, which means you'll probably end up harbor hopping up and down the coast. If that's the sort of sailing you want to do, and if you're able to wait out unfavorable conditions, and if your navigation abilities are well honed, you'll be fine with Catalina 32.

But better off with a 34.
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Old 25-10-2010, 05:59   #27
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The right tool for the right job

I've also been wondering about "is our boat the right one?" We have a Pearson 34 and hope to do the intercoastal waterway in the US and the islands. I hope to never be offshore more than 24 hours, ever.


But reading on many forums I need a blue water boat. I've had the boat out in 25+ knots on the Pamlico Sound and it feels like my fillings are going to get knocked out because the boat does pound! So last weekend I got to talk to a long term cruiser, one that has done the east coast of the US and the south Pacific. She said to get a blue water boat because you never know where you'll end up. Buy your last boat to cruise so you will never have to upgrade.

I'd love to get that big heavy expensive boat but the extra money it will take to buy and equip it will let me sail for at least one to two years on the cost to upgrade alone.

So I looked on the internet, found some possible big boats and then thought about it all night. Thought about how much it will cost, how much work it will take to fix up, the two years of working on the boat at every opportunity to get it ready.

Then this morning my head cleared and I remembered similar situations where I did what was right for me, not the the common opinion.

So here are other times when the herd and I parted ways:

Buy the biggest house you can afford. Don't pay off your house, the tax deduction will hurt you. ( I paid off our starter home and hope to rent it for income to cruise!)

Buy your car by borrowing against the home so you can deduct the interest. (Finally learned to pay cash, wish I'd done that sooner!)

Invest in the stock market for the long term. ( Done that some but wised up!)

Don't buy gold it never makes money. ( I wished I'd bought all I could 9 years ago.)

Don't buy those junky Harbour Freight tools. ( Some times a throw away tool is the best.)

Don' buy that really high priced tool. (Somtiems the good stuff is worth the price.)

Keep that %$# job for the security. (What security? )

Don't pay off all your debt, it will ruin your credit score. ( Debt free means I may be able to cruise someday.)

You've got a big boat, you can go out in this. (I've also got a wife that won't go with me if I beat her up due to macho attitude.)

So I started writing this to clear my head some more. And then I remembered what an old sailor told me years ago that is very important and that I didn't want to hear, "What happens to old sailors? Why they sell their sailboats and buy trawlers and motor up and down the intercoastal. "

I don't think they make bluewater trawlers. If some retiree can go where I want to go, on a boat the will roll with every wave, then surely I can make it on the Pearson!

Sorry if I rambled but I needed to write this out to put my thoughts in order.

Dale
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Old 25-10-2010, 07:04   #28
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look at an Islander 32 (1977-1978). Robert Perry design - many excellent reviews.

Have had one for 20 years. Another option is the 36ft.
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Old 25-10-2010, 07:04   #29
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LOL... all small boats pound going upwind in the Pamlico Sound.
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Old 25-10-2010, 08:22   #30
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While not our choice, we did have a friend who made a circumnavigation in a Catalina 36 (S/V Patriot) a few years ago. He was pleased with his boat.
Also, large cockpits hold a LOT of water if they get pooped!
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