Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 22-11-2010, 06:34   #16
Senior Cruiser
 
Vasco's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Toronto
Boat: CS36Merlin, "La Belle Aurore" Ben393 "Breathless"
Posts: 7,138
I've towed a dink on the transom like that but only in very sheltered waters. I used to tow that way through the N.Y. State canal system. Works fine and no need to worry about the painter getting caught in the prop. Also no problem when backing and filling when trying to get a good spot in the lock.
__________________

__________________
Rick I
Toronto in summer, Bahamas in winter.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beneteau393/
Vasco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 06:41   #17
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: southcoast ontario ca
Boat: Georgian 23 Whiskeyjack
Posts: 296
Images: 1
Here's a thought, if you haven't got room to store it on the foredeck or cabin top during passage:

1.Get a clever craftsman to make you a nameboard for your boat out of 1 x 6" teak or mahogany. Install nameboard on your transom. Now you have a narrow ledge to support the transom of your dinghy
2. Install a pair of padeyes on the transom of your dinghy. Pass a line through them that is long enough to reach the last eye on the stern end of your toe rails on each side of the mothership.
3. Hang a block from your backstay or boom, and extend your dinghy painter so it is long enough to feed through the block.

Now you can back your dinghy up to the transom, tie off your new sternbridle to the toerails, run your painter through the block, and heave the nose up until the dinghy is vertical, with the transom resting on your nameboard, then secure it by tightening the stern bridle and running a line across the stern rail. It ain't pretty, but it gets the dinghy out of the water with the added bonus of being quick to cut loose if you need your dinghy in the water in a hurry.
__________________

__________________
bljones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 07:16   #18
Registered User
 
JamuJoe's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Durango, CO
Boat: Leopard 42 - JAMU
Posts: 190
Images: 13
I think that any seas at all would bang up your transom and the dink. There are commercial items for doing something like you envision. I recommend that you either get some davits or tow with a long painter.
__________________
Safe Sailing,
JamuJoe - Durango, CO
S/V JAMU - Western Caribbean
JamuJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 07:19   #19
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,209
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
Here's a thought, if you haven't got room to store it on the foredeck or cabin top during passage:

1.Get a clever craftsman to make you a nameboard for your boat out of 1 x 6" teak or mahogany. Install nameboard on your transom. Now you have a narrow ledge to support the transom of your dinghy
2. Install a pair of padeyes on the transom of your dinghy. Pass a line through them that is long enough to reach the last eye on the stern end of your toe rails on each side of the mothership.
3. Hang a block from your backstay or boom, and extend your dinghy painter so it is long enough to feed through the block.

Now you can back your dinghy up to the transom, tie off your new sternbridle to the toerails, run your painter through the block, and heave the nose up until the dinghy is vertical, with the transom resting on your nameboard, then secure it by tightening the stern bridle and running a line across the stern rail. It ain't pretty, but it gets the dinghy out of the water with the added bonus of being quick to cut loose if you need your dinghy in the water in a hurry.
I was thinking along similar lines (just a timber ledge) but a careful look at your stern put me off... stern light, outboard mount etc....
If you've a masthead trilight and don't have an outboard its feasable... also gives you shelter when running downwind...
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 07:28   #20
Registered User
 
bruce smith's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: puget sound/ caribbean
Boat: never wrecked a boat while awake or sober
Posts: 330
Rimfire about to have a misfire

I do not tow a dingy across the harbor!!
__________________
bruce smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 08:25   #21
Eternal Member
 
imagine2frolic's Avatar

Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Las Brisas Panama AGAIN!
Boat: Simpson, Catamaran, 46ft. IMAGINE
Posts: 4,508
Images: 123
A disaster waiting to happen. Cut the thing in half, and make it a nesting dink, so it will fit the bow.........i2f
__________________
SAILING is not always a slick magazine cover!
BORROWED..No single one of is as smart as all of us!
http://sailingwithcancer.blogspot.com/
imagine2frolic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 09:16   #22
CF Adviser
 
Bash's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: sausalito
Boat: 14 meter sloop
Posts: 7,260
some of you seem to be alluding to Weavers davits. But it should be noted that Weavers specifically states that their "davits" are not intended for sailboats.

A proper set of davits would solve your problem instantly.
__________________
cruising is entirely about showing up--in boat shoes.
Bash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 09:41   #23
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Napa CA USA
Boat: Piver Victress
Posts: 87
I tow an 8ft grp dinghy and have learnt several lessons the hard way ...

1. Use floating line ... that means it doesn't get among your prop
2. Tow the dinghy with 2 lines ... regardless of whether or not you rig a bridle ... use 2 towing lines ... when [not if] one line fails you still have a dinghy
3. Use L-O-N-G towing lines when sailing or motoring downwind or when there is a following sea ... long towing lines keep the dinghy in the next trough behind meaning the dinghy doesn't surf downwave & ram your transome
4. Do not leave gear in or attached to the dinghy whilst under tow ... outboard, bailer, oarlocks & fuel container have all mysteriously vanished at one point or another
5. Beware dinghy filling up with water when it rains
6. Employ effective anti-chafe measures for both towing lines & check frequently for signs of chafe
__________________
svtadpole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 19:00   #24
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Boat: No boat, looking again.
Posts: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by vintageray View Post
The oddest thing I noticed in the top photo is the shark in the lower left corner coming to eat you.
You are right, it is a shark! I wasn't worried about it as I had slapped on heaps of insect repellant to keep the bities away. Oh, . . . . hang on, sharks are not insects .
__________________
troppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 19:04   #25
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Boat: No boat, looking again.
Posts: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by cfarrar View Post
I assume you've seen this: Dinghy Tow

I've never used one, myself, and I'm not sure about doing it with a hard dink....
I haven't seen that before, but I think I must have vaguely heard of it which is what gave me the idea in the first place. I don't get original ideas, in fact, I am happy if I get any idea .

I checked the details of Dinghy Tow, it can be used with hard dinghies if there is enough flotation in the bow to prevent it sinking if it got filled. I had thought if water got in it I could use it as a live-bait bucket.
__________________
troppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 19:13   #26
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Boat: No boat, looking again.
Posts: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by svtadpole View Post
I tow an 8ft grp dinghy and have learnt several lessons the hard way ...

1. Use floating line
2. Tow the dinghy with 2 lines
3. Use L-O-N-G towing lines when sailing or . . .
4. Do not leave gear in or attached to the dinghy whilst under tow ...
5. Beware dinghy filling up with water when it rains
6. Employ effective anti-chafe measures for both towing lines & check frequently for signs of chafe
This is what I do (except I have used one line so might move to two) so, sigh, I might just stick with it for now.

My concern is looking after the dinghy when a storm hits. I had thought it may be easier to handle if more strongly connected to the stern, but it seems like it wouldn't be. I'll see how it goes, I may just end up getting an inflatable.
__________________
troppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 19:27   #27
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Boat: No boat, looking again.
Posts: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bash View Post
A proper set of davits would solve your problem instantly.
Hmm, maybe davits are an option. I admit I have never been on a boat this size with them so I assumed my boat was too small for davits. Any thoughts?
__________________
troppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 19:29   #28
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Boat: No boat, looking again.
Posts: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagine2frolic View Post
Cut the thing in half, and make it a nesting dink, so it will fit the bow.........i2f
Ah, interesting thought. I just love my chainsaw. So long as I could put the bits back together, this suggestion is something to think about.
__________________
troppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 19:39   #29
Registered User

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Boat: No boat, looking again.
Posts: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by bljones View Post
Here's a thought, if you haven't got room to store it on the foredeck or cabin top during passage:

1.Get a clever craftsman to make you a nameboard for your boat out of 1 x 6" teak or mahogany . . .
I think if the transom was bigger, I might look at doing something like this. Or perhaps look at commercial systems for example this dinghy sling thing: davits, davit systems for inflatable boats.
__________________
troppo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 19:59   #30
Mooderator
 
capngeo's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Key West & Sarasota
Boat: Cal 28 "Happy Days"
Posts: 4,211
Images: 12
Send a message via Yahoo to capngeo Send a message via Skype™ to capngeo
Quote:
Originally Posted by JamuJoe View Post
I think that any seas at all would bang up your transom and the dink. There are commercial items for doing something like you envision. I recommend that you either get some davits or tow with a long painter.
+1^^^^^^

I tried something very similar once years ago... it wasn't pretty!
__________________

__________________
Any fool with a big enough checkbook can BUY a boat; it takes a SPECIAL type of fool to build his own! -Capngeo
capngeo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Finding a Tow wildshore Seamanship & Boat Handling 11 11-03-2010 09:08
Tow Your Dinghy or Leave at Anchorage? kcmarcet Auxiliary Equipment & Dinghy 17 21-11-2009 06:55
Has Anyone Tried a Dinghy-Tow? Soon2BCruiser Seamanship & Boat Handling 8 02-10-2009 18:18
Dinghy on Deck, Davits or Tow? Colorado Dreamer General Sailing Forum 11 06-01-2009 11:56
tow boat US or Sea tow . irwinsailor Dollars & Cents 3 27-04-2004 14:51



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 00:13.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.