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Old 13-08-2010, 20:23   #46
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There are a dozen boatyards within a 20 minute drive from my mooring in Narragansett Bay. If I get screwed by one, I'll find another. My experience has been good so far. The work has been competent.

And I guarantee that my boat is turnkey right now. Will full tanks and sufficient provisions she could sail anywhere in the world without spending a dime on maintenance or replacement items. The only thing lacking is the renewal FCC license for the SSB, which I don't need for the coastal sailing I'm doing now.
But if and when it breaks down who's gonna fix it if you aren't 20 minutes from the boatyard? If you don't learn how to fix things yourself, you will always be tied to fancy boatyards.
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Old 14-08-2010, 00:47   #47
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I put a good auxiliary engine under the category of safety equipment



Just as an aside: I was wondering the other day about the term "auxiliary engine". I'm stuffed if many peoples boats engine really is auxiliary. Unless an old timer on an old timers boat I think the engine is a main form of power.

Friend of our has an 18hp donk on a 20 ton full keeler that moves it about 3 kts on a flat sea, no wind. Thats an auxiliary.

A modern boat needs, and usually has, an engine that can heave to a boat in a storm in an emergency (i.e. without sails), is reliable enough to enter ports in strong winds and is capable of docking, approaching lee shores etc.
And perhaps, most importantly being able to do continuous duty for a few days to power though calms, canals and doldrums.

In buying an old fixer-upper I would be wondering what sort of engine is onboard: Auxiliary or main.


Just food for thought.


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Old 14-08-2010, 01:45   #48
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I have an engine big enough (33hp 4cly Diesel w/ 16" 3-bladed prop) to push me into 40kt headwinds w/15ft waves or tow a boat bigger than my own at a reasonable clip or push me along at hull speed with out using too much fuel.
As sails are the primary source of power on a sailboat that would make engines secondary or auxiliary. When engines become primary the type of vessel becomes a motorsailer
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Old 14-08-2010, 02:39   #49
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As sails are the primary source of power on a sailboat that would make engines secondary or auxiliary. When engines become primary the type of vessel becomes a motorsailer
I think that's about right. We have 28hp with a 2-blade and it gets the job done. Sure there are times when you like a little more but its a two-edge sword. If you have so much power you think you can push through whatever the ocean throws at you then you're more likely to put yourself in harms way. Safety can be measured in many ways. At least that's the way I've always look at it.

I wish I had the skills to go engine-less, but I don't. I still think its possible. Obviously, there are people doing it and doing it well.
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Old 14-08-2010, 06:35   #50
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But if and when it breaks down who's gonna fix it if you aren't 20 minutes from the boatyard? If you don't learn how to fix things yourself, you will always be tied to fancy boatyards.
If it's electrical or electronic, it's going to stay broken unless it's something simple (e.g. it isn't plugged in). Could you fix your radar if it stopped working? Do you keep spare parts (e.g. extra circuit boards, switches, etc.) for your radar and your chartplotter?

The notion that you can fix everything yourself is bogus. Most people can't. And even if they could, they'd rather be doing something else.
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Old 14-08-2010, 07:05   #51
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When I bought my Columbia 41 there was a Morgan 41 on the hard nearby. The asking price on the Morgan was $35k. On my boat it was $25k; the lower price was due to the previous owner living two hours away. No time for maintenance or to enjoy the boat. So, you can find good deals on big older boats. Just look around at local marinas. When you see something of interest on the hard stand ask to contact the owner. It's hard to sell any boat over 10 years old regardless of condition because it is so hard to obtain financing. The asking price will be much depressed.
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Old 14-08-2010, 08:32   #52
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The notion that you can fix everything yourself is bogus. Most people can't. And even if they could, they'd rather be doing something else.
Not true, Everything on our boat, I've built or rebuilt, including the radar, And there is a saying amoungest cruisers, Its not called cruising, Its called "repairing your boat in exoitic ports"..
If anyone has the notion that they are going outbound with the boat not needing repairs in the next port, they are fooling themselves. There is always something that needs attention, either from breaking or something needing service...
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Old 14-08-2010, 08:42   #53
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If it's electrical or electronic, it's going to stay broken unless it's something simple (e.g. it isn't plugged in). Could you fix your radar if it stopped working? Do you keep spare parts (e.g. extra circuit boards, switches, etc.) for your radar and your chartplotter?

The notion that you can fix everything yourself is bogus. Most people can't. And even if they could, they'd rather be doing something else.
And if its not electrical, what are you going to do? Let's say your engine starts overheating for some reason. Can you figure out why? Can you fix it? If not, what would you do?

No I can not fix everything, but I can fix a lot of things. I carry a lot of spares, manuals and the tools to install them. I can't replace a circuit board in the radar, but if an connection or plug needs replacing I've got a soldering gun and the equipment to make the repair.

Do you carry any spares? If not, why not? If you do, who will install them? From a safety standpoint alone, if you're going to be cruising you need to be able to make basic repairs like replacing a raw water impeller or bleeding a fuel line. I might rather be doing something else, but at least I won't be stuck in some remote area waiting for a repairman from the closest boatyard if there even is such a person.
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Old 14-08-2010, 09:10   #54
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I have spares for everything, including the engine (Yanmar sells a kit, and I always carry spare belts, filters, etc.) I can replace an impeller and bleed the engine because I went to a course on diesel engines. I carry a sailmaker's kit, spare sails, spare halyards and sheets, spare fasteners, blocks, and hardware of every description, a full set of tools, etc. etc. I have a complete operating manual for everything on my boat.

That being said, I have no interest in learing how to fix a radar or gps. If the radar goes, I'll buy a new one and pay someone like you to install it.

I have better things to do on weekends and after work than repairing my boat. I don't enjoy it.
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Old 14-08-2010, 12:01   #55
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And I guarantee that my boat is turnkey right now.
Sure. I dramaticized my post a bit. I know there are places with great boatyards that will do great job. I have been to such places. Far and apart, but they do exist.

If you are in such an area and you can afford the service then a good boatyard is a better solution than doing things one little knows about.

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Old 14-08-2010, 12:17   #56
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I have not had any difficulty finding boatyards that do good work. The challenge is to find one that will do the work for a fair price.
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Old 14-08-2010, 12:27   #57
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Here's an Alberg 37 in my area.

Sailboat-37ft Classic Alberg Yawl

kind regards,
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