Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 17-11-2010, 13:22   #61
Registered User
 
storyinframes's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mumbai
Boat: Westsail32
Posts: 256
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to storyinframes
Sail Calculator Pro v3.53 - 2000+ boats

thanks for the link dingoman. its very helpful site
__________________

__________________
storyinframes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2010, 14:22   #62
Registered User
 
silverp40's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Usually where the boat is...
Boat: Pearson 40
Posts: 514
Images: 7
What are the possible enhancements/structural additions and alterations one can do for modern light displacement boats to make them passageworthy?

Main things are to keep the boat upright and the sea out. So, thru hulls have to all be good quality, preferably bronze with closing seacocks and good hoses, bulkheads properly glassed/tabbed to the hull, mast in good condition and the stays/terminals also in great shape. Some boats have poor hull to deck connections (example Columbia 45) which should be remedied, less the joint opens up in a seaway. Pumps good quality and properly installed. Diesel should also be dependable.

Cheers
__________________

__________________
silverp40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2010, 14:47   #63
cruiser

Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,167
Quote:
Originally Posted by goboatingnow View Post
Its a falacy that you can take a knockdown wooden boat and repair it cheaply, you can bodge it up thats it, but the proper materials can cost a fortune and thats not counting your time.

Equally with a old GRP, take a look at the replacement costs of engines sails, deck gear etc etc etc. sometime you could get the boat for zero and it would still cost a fortune, and that assumes you don't have " hidden " problems like core delamination etc. In my experience for every 1 dirt cheap boat that usuable theres 50 that are just junk.

Dave
You are assuming someone with a used boat, will buy everything new. We are awash in used gear, in nearly new condition, for a fraction the new cost,or sails for a fraction the cost of the materials in them.
Used engines , in good condition, can be had for $1,000
There are plenty of solid core fibreglass, hulls available for a fraction the cost of the materials in them.
One can get cruising with a fraction the equipment some consider essential today , equipment which was unavailable, or not yet invented, not so long ago. Not having it didn't stop anyone from cruising then.
__________________
Brent Swain is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2010, 14:49   #64
Registered User
 
silverp40's Avatar

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Usually where the boat is...
Boat: Pearson 40
Posts: 514
Images: 7

I fully agree with Brent...
__________________
silverp40 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2010, 15:14   #65
Freelance Delivery Skipper..
 
boatman61's Avatar

Community Sponsor
Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: UK/Portugal
Posts: 20,210
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to boatman61
pirate

Aaaaaarrrrrr...... Swing that lantern... Jimlad ye scurvy knave...... wheres me damn parrot.....
Nice one Brent....
__________________


Born To Be Wild
boatman61 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2010, 12:17   #66
Registered User
 
storyinframes's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mumbai
Boat: Westsail32
Posts: 256
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to storyinframes
<object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/GvkWjQYzuCM?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/GvkWjQYzuCM?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390"></object>

I guess this is a video of Sydney-Hobart race. Amazed at the skill with which the skipper is riding. Awesome!
__________________
storyinframes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2010, 12:39   #67
Registered User
 
bruce smith's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: puget sound/ caribbean
Boat: never wrecked a boat while awake or sober
Posts: 330
Were we to take away todays weather forecasting technology, fewer "performance" boats would be successfully making ocean passages.
Boats are crossing oceans without even hitting a squal, much less a gale. The speed is part of the survival equasion .
__________________
bruce smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2010, 12:57   #68
Registered User
 
storyinframes's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mumbai
Boat: Westsail32
Posts: 256
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to storyinframes
what i intended with that video was the "skill" of the skipper.
Average sailors would face severe consequences.
@Bruce Smith : weather reports are crucial for ocean crossing. Imagine getting stuck in a storm like this. After all how many yachties would have that kind of skill and stamina to "race" through that storm.

Can you ride out that kind of storm with sails down and may be trailing a drogue in water?
__________________
storyinframes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2010, 15:07   #69
Registered User
 
bruce smith's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: puget sound/ caribbean
Boat: never wrecked a boat while awake or sober
Posts: 330
Been hit by hurricanes at sea twice. Most recent was Sergio 18/nov/ 06, 200 miles west of Acapulco. ( and Nana 95? north of Beermuda) So, yea, my boat rides em. out bare poles, no drogue or sea anchor.
Weather reports ARE crucial, for modern boats. For a true bluewater boat, they are a convenience.
Conditions in that video, I'd be going about 1/3 the speed, but reading or asleep in my bunk.
__________________
bruce smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21-11-2010, 17:59   #70
Registered User
 
NotQuiteLost's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Paradise (better known to most people as: Philippines)
Boat: 65' Custom Steel Ketch
Posts: 322
Images: 4
Totally agree with the thought on this page thus far. Frequent (and accurate) weather reports, GPS accurate to the meter, electronic chart packages detailing underwater topography for every nook and cranny and immediate communications via sat-phone or the ever-improving SSB/HAM technology makes 'modern' boats viable, whereas fifty years ago they would have been (and WERE) considered deathtraps for cruisers.

Caught in a typhoon for four days, my big ol' steel job hove to and rode out the worst of it with nary a scratch. Never even threatened a knockdown in 60knots plus and 25-30 foot seas. I must say, it was comfortable and stable enough that I watched movies and played computer games until the winds came back down to a reasonable 40knots or so sustained, at which point the sails went back out and I was on my way once again.

edit to add: it is pretty shocking the first time a 30' wave crests and smashes into the side of your steel hull. I was sure I'd hit something solid, and was checking everything under the sole for incoming water. Turns out, water makes quite a racket when it hits metal with that much power behind it. I just smiled every other time it happened afterwards.
NotQuiteLost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 08:53   #71
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 2
Proper Bluewater Boat

Re a good 'bluewater boat' for short money, a few thoughts come to mind after a review of this thread.
One can go to sea in anything. Webb Chiles went in an open canoe. Thor Heyerdahl crossed the Pacific in a balsa raft. People have sailed in Cal 25's, Ranger 23's, Catalinas and Bendy boats. If you want to takes your chances have at it. However there has been a lot of thought and research put out there which outlines pretty convincingly to me , that the safer, more comfortable alternatives lie in heavier, longer keeled vessels, capable of being set up to steer themselves, and carry a reasonable amount of provisions, fuel, and water, and get there with a good turn of speed.
Lighter vessels heavily laden do not perform well.
I have often given the example of imagining setting to sea as a mouse in small vessel. How would I feel / survive in a plastic milk carton versus a glass wine bottle. The milk carton would skitter and bounce hither and yon
at the whim of the winds and seas. The wine bottle would be a much more comfortable craft in which to spend the crossing.
Think Contessa 32, Bristol Channel Cutter (or any Lyle Hess design), Cape Dory 31, 33, 36, or my own boat a Nicholson 31. None of them race winners ( except the Contessa in the 79 Fastnet ) but they will get you there comfortably and safely.
__________________
blueprintbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 09:05   #72
Registered User
 
ReMetau's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Marathon, FL
Boat: Hans Christian 33
Posts: 648
Here you go. This guy sailed this boat down from Miami to Key West on the way to Ft. Myers. He sleeps and eats on this thing. Notice the pan hanging in the cockpit.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2010 Fantasy Fest Last Night 193.JPG
Views:	179
Size:	57.9 KB
ID:	21398   Click image for larger version

Name:	2010 Fantasy Fest Last Night 192.JPG
Views:	193
Size:	73.8 KB
ID:	21399  

__________________
Don & Diana
s/v ReMetau - a Hans Christian 33
http://www.remetau.com
ReMetau is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 10:25   #73
Senior Cruiser
 
sneuman's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: May 2003
Location: Jamaica
Boat: Tayana 37 Cutter
Posts: 3,167
Images: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by NotQuiteLost View Post
Totally agree with the thought on this page thus far. Frequent (and accurate) weather reports, GPS accurate to the meter, electronic chart packages detailing underwater topography for every nook and cranny and immediate communications via sat-phone or the ever-improving SSB/HAM technology makes 'modern' boats viable, whereas fifty years ago they would have been (and WERE) considered deathtraps for cruisers.

Caught in a typhoon for four days, my big ol' steel job hove to and rode out the worst of it with nary a scratch. Never even threatened a knockdown in 60knots plus and 25-30 foot seas. I must say, it was comfortable and stable enough that I watched movies and played computer games until the winds came back down to a reasonable 40knots or so sustained, at which point the sails went back out and I was on my way once again.

edit to add: it is pretty shocking the first time a 30' wave crests and smashes into the side of your steel hull. I was sure I'd hit something solid, and was checking everything under the sole for incoming water. Turns out, water makes quite a racket when it hits metal with that much power behind it. I just smiled every other time it happened afterwards.
What you said brings back some memories. Let me tell you, a 30' wall of water makes quite a racket on fiberglass, too! I went through one of those beasts that forms off the Philippines, in a 28' sloop. I wish I'd had a proper sea anchor at the time, because next time (I hope not) I'd do what you did instead of running with the storm.
__________________
Voyage of Symbiosis: http://svsymbiosis.blogspot.com/
sneuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 11:36   #74
Registered User

Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Bellingham WA
Boat: 17' faering Ironblood, building 34' schooner Javelin
Posts: 305
80k? Check this: I have built/owned 15 sailboats, and am building one now. The 15 include: 34' aluminum Colvin schooner, 26' plywood Colvin sharpie, 2 Viking designed 17' faerings, 8 skiffs, 3 prams. Total cost of all of those 36k. I am building a 33' DE hard chined gaff cutter. I have most of the materials on hand already, and the cost at launch will be right around 10k. I have looked at perhaps five sail away [or close] FRP sloops, built in the 60s or 3arly 70s, all ocean capable and all for under 15k. Now it is true that I do not need a master stateroom big enough to sleep 6 women with me. I do not need more than one place to poop. I can cook quite well on a very small cook stove. I do not need an engine to sail a boat wherever I want. I do not need most of the stuff which drives boat 'costs' thru the roof. I absolutely love the building process, and I sneer at the Madison Avenue boat layouts. If you want to go cruising, buy a Pearson 30' full keel Alberg design for 10k and go. Quit talking about it. Or a Columbia 29. Sell the engine and use the space for cruising gear. A Pearson Triton. If you need two staterooms and a shower for three and you absolutely NEED to spend 100k, buy a condo. Look, if you buy a 40' boat you will probably NEED an engine. Buy a Triton or a Pearson 30, and you can SELL the engine for a third of what you paid for the boat. Pack it up with cruising gear [NO, not 5000 dollars worth of toys] and [if you are on the West Coast] do the Mexico-Hawaii-home circuit. Then you know some stuff and can make up your mind, and your total outlay has been 1/4 of that 80k. Just do it.
__________________
MichaelC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22-11-2010, 12:42   #75
Registered User
 
storyinframes's Avatar

Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Mumbai
Boat: Westsail32
Posts: 256
Images: 2
Send a message via Skype™ to storyinframes
80k? Check this: I have built/owned 15 sailboats, and am building one now. The 15 include: 34' aluminum Colvin schooner, 26' plywood Colvin sharpie, 2 Viking designed 17' faerings, 8 skiffs, 3 prams. Total cost of all of those 36k. I am building a 33' DE hard chined gaff cutter. I have most of the materials on hand already, and the cost at launch will be right around 10k.

Hello MichaelC, thanks for the input. do you have a site where I can see some of your work?
what do you think of Southern cross 35/39s?
And, do you think Aluminium hulls are expensive to maintain compared to fibreglass?
and how cheap would it be to get a custom made aluminium32/35 footer?

quite a lot of questions for you? :-)
__________________

__________________
storyinframes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I Really Need a Bluewater Boat ? scm007 Monohull Sailboats 108 15-09-2010 06:58
Bluewater Boat for Under $40k camcam Monohull Sailboats 56 14-08-2010 12:27
I Don't Want a Bluewater Boat unbusted67 Monohull Sailboats 63 19-09-2009 19:02
Preference for Bluewater Boat? 3333feet General Sailing Forum 6 10-06-2009 13:58
How much of a bluewater/open ocean boat do I actually need? Crossett Monohull Sailboats 36 21-05-2007 10:24



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:14.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.