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Old 02-01-2007, 16:49   #16
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I was always taught that you pick the size of the pump based on the size of the hole you intended to make in the hull ... not the size of the boat In this case, bigger is better ... bigger & more is better yet!
Bob
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Old 03-01-2007, 02:24   #17
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To amplify Bob’s statement - since potential hole size is in no way* dependant upon boat size, it could be (and has been) argued that smaller boats require larger pumps.
The smaller the boat, the less inflooding it can accept, and stay afloat.

* The obvious exceptions are existing through-hull sizes; being generally smaller on smaller boats.

See:

“Choosing and Installing Bilge Pumps” by Terry Johnson
University of Alaska Sea Grant, Marine Advisory Program
(From Pacific Fishing, April 2001)

http://seagrant.uaf.edu/bookstore/bo...ilge-pumps.pdf

See also:
”Bilge Water Blues” ~ by David Pascoe
Solving the Problem of Leftover Bilge Water
Bilge Water Blues: Boat Maintenance/Repairs

And:
“A Water Pump Primer” ~ By Terry Johnson
University of Alaska Sea Grant (From Pacific Fishing, March 2001)
http://seagrant.uaf.edu/bookstore/bo...ater-pumps.pdf
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Old 09-01-2007, 13:54   #18
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Bilge Pump

Be sure that when you install your pump that you will be easily able to access it for servicing, clearing filter etc.

The deepest part of my bilge is below my engine and is impossible for me to reach by hand. My pump and float switch is mounted on a piece of anodised aluminium plate, and a long handle fixed to the plate to enable me to lift it from the bilge area periodically to check.

Fair winds

Steve
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Old 09-01-2007, 15:05   #19
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Get a diagraph pump, sump pickup with check valve, an electronic water sensor. Mount the pump high above the water line. Those drop in all in one bilge pumps are crap. They are displacement pumps and the smallest amount of debris will plug em up. I have a Rule 500 that you can have. On the pumps, I recommend Jabsco. Don't buy a pump based on it's rated capacity only. Once you put 6 feet or so of head on a pump it's capacity can take a dive.
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Old 09-01-2007, 20:42   #20
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Thanks again for such informative replies. To date we have managed to repair one of our whale gushes (required being taken to bits and cleaned - heaps of dirt etc then put back together). Works very well but obviously would be tiring for a long period. Progress people, progress.....
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Old 09-01-2007, 22:37   #21
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Lesse,

The original cheap, I think "Rule" pump that came with the boat from the factory back in '92. Removed the float switch so its only manual. Still works wonderful today. Just used it this last weekend to pump out the rainwater from these last storms.

That and a manual one that can be run from the cockpit.

This system has worked wonderful for years of daysailing. Going offshore? Make sure you have at least one of them 5 gallon white paint buckets. Perfect backup bilge pump. Also works as a dish washer, clothes washer, bait bucket, sea water grabber, repair parts holder.. You know.

-jim lee
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Old 15-01-2007, 17:09   #22
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I, too, prefer diaphram pumps. This winter we are pulling and shipping off our pumps for routine servicing. If you go with a Rule type submersible - buy a spare at the same time.
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Old 15-01-2007, 17:48   #23
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I subscribe to the large pump in a small bilge and average pump in a large bilge theroy.
My Cheoy Lee had a 750 GPM pump. My Hunter 30 and a 1000GPM pump.
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Old 15-01-2007, 18:47   #24
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The boat I'm on tonight "Sew Good" has a diaphragm pump mounted a couple of feet above the bilge proper. I had to put a screen on the bottom of the intake hose, not to keep debris out, but to keep the hose from sucking itself solid to the bottom!!! My new boat, "Night Wind" has a rule 1000GPH (on a removable aluminum arm) ... but with one of the new solid state water detectors (as opposed to a tradional float switch) .... the best arrangement? A combination of all of the above. A diaphragm pump mounted up out of the bilge, but with a solid state sensor.
Bob
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Old 15-01-2007, 19:13   #25
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Solid state is a great idea. Next issue is do the two pumps share a thru-hull or are they separate.
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Old 15-01-2007, 19:47   #26
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Pat, them's some humungus pumps...

Deep
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Old 16-01-2007, 11:18   #27
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The last I'd heard of solid state was some years ago when PS (I think) ran a test on them and found things like oil in the bilge water could "break" those too. I think those were capacitive sensing devices back then...maybe by now they've figured out a better way? (Send the mate below barefoot in the dark, if they shriek it's time to pump the bilge.<G>)
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Old 16-01-2007, 11:40   #28
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Automatic Bilge pump is a good idea, a small Weep over a long period can let in a lot of water, and if you have one with a switch on yer dash with a light (and buzzer?) when it operates it will serve as a warning of something "going on" down below.........before it reachers yer cornflakes.

As aged fittings and split hoses are a source of unexpected water - consider having a bag of wooden bungs and some gaffa tape onboard.
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Old 16-01-2007, 19:28   #29
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We have wooden bungs attached to every outlet. There was a situation a few years back here when a solo sailor sailing back to Napier lost his yacht when his speedlog somehow dislogged. In the confusion and the water he lost his bung and whilst abandoning ship he lost his liferaft /inflatable (or whatever it was he had. Fortunately there was a trawler near by. The guy has not sailed since. So I have decided 2 attached bungs to each outlet might be a good idea.
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Old 16-01-2007, 19:39   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DeepFrz
Pat, them's some humungus pumps...

Deep
Yeah, it was probably overkill on the Cheoy. BUt the engine lived in the bilge. I could take on about 50Gal before getting water in the trans of engine.
The Hunter had a bilge of about 6 cubic feet.
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