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Old 29-11-2008, 04:16   #106
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Originally Posted by CaptForce View Post
When it comes to safety, I would suggest that people are giving to much emphasis to size. A far greater factor are the choices made by the captain and crew. What inlets to avoid in what weather choice; do you wait for better weather; do you choose a daylight landfall? If the vessel is sound; then, prudent navigation far exceeds the importance of vessel size! 'take care and joy, Aythya crew
Well said, my friend!

P.S And welcome to the forum.
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Old 01-12-2008, 12:35   #107
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This makes no sense to me. Why would the size of the boat make a difference in the time required to raise anchor? Or the time required to set reefed sails? .....
Judy
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currently in New Zealand

It makes sense to me and is consistent with my experiences. Larger boats, tend to have larger forces involved in almost all aspects of operating them due to the increased surface area of the boat and sails as well as weight. Boat items which are heavier or larger are likely going to take more effort to manage, especially in adverse condtions.

It takes more effort for example to raise a 45 lb anchor and heavier chain rode than a 22 lb. anchor and lighter chain rode. This difference in required effort could make all the difference in adverse conditions. Larger boats also tend to have to anchor in deeper water meaning there is likely more rode out and they are more exposed to conditions.

On my previous pocket cruiser, I could often pull in the sheets quickly by hand. The tension of a twang on the sheet of a 50-foot maxi provided enough force to break my finger without even pinching or crushing it. That spiral fracture not only really hurt, but made it nearly impossible for me perform many tasks. (It also looks really goofey when one finger goes off at a 45 degree angle to all the others.)

As far as reefing, my expereince has been that I can reasonably reef or lower a sail myself on my own 33-foot boat, but can remember three of us doing so with difficulty when being flailed by the sail of a 50-footer in 30 knots.

I'll admit, the systems one has can make an enormous difference in how easy certain tasks are to accomplish.

Again, I'm not arguing smaller boats are the best choice for everyone, I'm just pointing out that larger boats are not necessarily safer in all respects. Someone who has a better understanding of all the advantages and disadvantages of differnet boats as they begin to shop is more likely to end up with a boat that best suits their needs.
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Old 01-12-2008, 14:11   #108
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Yes, My 47 footer with brand new lewmar #52 (54?) winches almost had me in Dfib several times trying to get the jib in in a blow. (release the sheet, winch in the furler , trim the sheet etc) Raising the main on my 42 ft Cat took several minutes due to the weight of the huge full battened main with Harken cars. My 30 footer... I just grabbed the halyard at the mast and pulled it up in 6 ft chunks!
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Old 01-12-2008, 14:40   #109
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Yes, My 47 footer with brand new lewmar #52 (54?) winches almost had me in Dfib several times trying to get the jib in in a blow. (release the sheet, winch in the furler , trim the sheet etc) Raising the main on my 42 ft Cat took several minutes due to the weight of the huge full battened main with Harken cars. My 30 footer... I just grabbed the halyard at the mast and pulled it up in 6 ft chunks!
HUMMMMMMM?,

But would you go back to the 30ftr?
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Old 01-12-2008, 14:57   #110
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Just been thro' two gales in our Tayana 55...Gusts to 55 knots and 20 ft seas did not faze her...But the cost of fixing her certaily fazes my check book.

Get the biggest boat you can handle and pay for...
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Old 01-12-2008, 15:05   #111
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Nah, I went to 32 ft early this year! But then again, I'm not sailing around the world. ;>) My current thinking for a couple world cruising would be 37-40 ft Medium to Light displacement with a long waterline. I have some French Canadien friends who are still out there and nearing their circumnavigation (Thailand?) in a quite stock Dufour 34. They would haul out in the boatyard after we did, be done in a couple of days, and be back on the hook, while we still were working on our big boat. They seemed to always enjoy doing things wherever they were located while the rest of us slaved to maintain our complicated systems, teak or whatever..... It's a mindset I guess. They were not young either!
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Old 01-12-2008, 17:20   #112
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Welcome aboard upsidedown...tell us more..sounds fun to me..
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Old 01-12-2008, 20:17   #113
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Ok so I'll kick in my $.02.........

I OWN my boat, a 1978 Pacific Seacraft 25 outright and I do ALL the repairs from stem to stern except sails and I may take a crack at that some day. I'm 50 and some of my systems are starting to fail but I have no problems single handing Turtle wherever I go.

She survived hurricane IKE but was grounded 50ft from shore and had some serious damage. She had a winch torn out of the coaming, her bobstay fitting and the stem area badly mangled and a 36" by 2" gash pounded in her side from slamming against her now grounded dock.

She was the only boat to go back in the water without having to pay the outrageous fees the salvors were charging. Several of my stronger friends and I got together and muscled her back to the water, 6000lbs x 46ft of ground. Some of the bigger boats had to pay better than $20000.

My small boat has been all over the western pacific starting with Hawaii as her first trip as a new boat. Sailed back to the US by way of Japan and the Allutians(sp?) passed down through the Sea of Cortez, through the canal and around the caribbean up to Florida and now to me a few years ago in Texas. She has shown herself to be more than able to stand up to pretty much anything the weather can dish out.

Her cost to me since her purchase including new sails, a major restoration, new electronics, wind and solar chargers, dock fees and her recent after IKE repairs AND her initial cost less than $25k.

I don't have extras because I find I don't need them and am quite happy without.

Ok so to my point.

If you got it spend it. If you feel you NEED to have all the bells and whistles and can afford it, do it. What you don't need however is to fall into the trap of being fed the crap that you MUST have an X size boat or its dangerous. Or you must have this or that gadget or you aren't getting it or are somehow short changing yourself or your family. Big boats cost BIGGER money.

I am very happy with my small boat. Would I like to have a larger boat? Of course. A Dana 24 would be right up my alley, actually a foot smaller than my current boat but with standing headroom and some other nice stuff. Or if I won the lotto a Crealock 34. Would I go into debt to get either of them? Not a chance. There is no stronger tie to the dock than a mortgage.

Go small, Go now is a regularly heard mantra that I dearly wish I had paid more attention to when I was younger. Instead I did the newer faster bigger better thing for far to long.

Whatever you decide enjoy it for YOU and let everyone else pi$$ off.........m
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Old 29-12-2008, 21:55   #114
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In surveys of liveabords, most owners of larger yachts would trade down gladly, while most smaller boats were happy where they were.
If I had unlimited money, I would go up to 70'.
But I don't, so 40 ' is great for my family. One day it will be just me and my mate.
40' might seem a bit large then.
One good head, 100 gal of water, 600-800 miles under power, no real complicated s ystems that I can't repair or do without, 1 inch more headroom that I stand (6'1") and bunks that are 6'6", a dry cockpit, and ... most important of all... turning around to see her, as I walk away, to check her lines, and admire the beauty of her...
That is most important.

Would I trade my 40 footer for a bigger boat ? No
Would I go down in size ? No

For us, we have found what works. Took a long while.

Bob
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Old 02-01-2009, 16:11   #115
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The bigger the boat the smaller the waves.
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Old 02-01-2009, 17:16   #116
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The bigger the boat the smaller the waves.
Not if a bigger boat means you end up going thru them , rather than over them.
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Old 02-01-2009, 21:01   #117
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Interesting discussion.

If I had the $$ I'd have a boat for every occasion. A kayak, a canoe, a 50 foot Viking Sportfisher, a 90 sailing yacht, a hobie cat. If it gets me out on the water
I'm a happy camper. Whatever floats our boats is what's best for us imho.

As I recall the post analysis of the '79 fastnet race; All of the skippers that employed the tactic of heaving-to came through the storm in good stead, albeit some bumps and bruises. Other tactics had mixed results. It would seem that sans size technique matters.

Is it Spring yet?

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Old 03-01-2009, 07:44   #118
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Great topic!
my 0.02
You buy the boat that fits your needs- including the budget. If you are long term cruising, and if thats what we are talking about, the boat needs to be large enough to accomodate all your stuff. The Pardeys can go quite small for many reasons, no engine means they do not have to carry spares etc etc. within any size range there are different configurations that allow for different types of sailing. I went for a 38 foot center cockpit ketch. The smaller rig of the ketch allows easier handling of the sails, the aft cabin provides real privacy if I have guests or crew. I also chose a boat that has a lot of storage and is an offshore capable seaworthy vessel. Friends of mine with the same size boat have far less storage ( its much narrower) and consequently moved up in size in order to maintain the pretty-ness of their boat, which was important to them- they like the long overhangs etc.
You can cruise on just about any boat, you have to pick whats important to you and go from there. Bigger boats do not HAVE to be more complex, there are quite a few people on 40+ vessels with very simple systems.
I chose not to have pressure water, or propane on board- but then I mostly single hand and ther is no admiral to tell me thats what they want, If ever I find a cruising companion who wants hot running water coz thats whats important to her then I shall install said system. If I had the money would I go bigger? perhaps, would I go smaller? absolutely not.
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Old 04-01-2009, 00:50   #119
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I was once told that your not a seasoned cruiser untill the Pardeys have hit you up for a tow...I have rephrased that for myself...I wont consider myself a seasoned cruiser untill I have turned them down for one....
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Old 04-01-2009, 10:41   #120
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Pardeys

Well, StillRaining, I think you missed your chance. The Pardeys were sailing Desolation Sound and out through Yuculta Rapids on their engine-less boat the year I was going 'round Vancouver Island. Since the time before that they'd been on Serrafyn, I expect they won't be in the area and in need of a tow for while.
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