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Old 21-11-2008, 18:46   #1
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Anyone Converted a Racing Boat to Cruising ?

Ive read about a few people doing this and they are happy with the
boat after conversion. The like the idea of the boat being built strong
for racing and some have lots of room underdeck to add many things.
Ive seen some nice large race boats up for sail with large sail inventories.
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Old 22-11-2008, 09:52   #2
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No personal experience, but one of the guys in our marina has done the first steps in that way… My impression is that as a race-boat it was pretty lightly built (44-45’, don’t know the designer… never was that curious) and designed for a full crew and his first $30-40K was spend rerunning the rigging so a small crew could get to them more readily… inside it mostly amounted to a shell with pipe-berths and a portapotty, so, as you say, lots of room for innovation… and he still had a 7’ draft boat, which wouldn’t be my choice for the Bay – he had to wait for the monthly high-tide to relaunch…

But it has certainly been done, Marchaj makes the case that the traditional CCA boats of the late 50s to the start of the IOR era have many good qualities… but by modern standards, I don’t think contemporary skippers would even consider CCA boats to be race-boats…
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Old 22-11-2008, 20:54   #3
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Slow boat owners say what's the rush

I have been restoring a 1984 34' Pearson racer/cruiser for the past 2 years. I now have less than $26,000 invested including original purchase. It took a full year before I sailed it for the first time. It was sailed hard and put up wet by the previous/original owner and he didn't maintain anything and did everything cheep. After motoring back and forth to haul it out with my 16 H.P. diesel I wondered if I had made a mistake. Then I put up the sails single handed by the way, I knew I had made the right choice. Because of the high aspect ratio main, 6' deep keel and partial skeged rudder it is very fast and easy to sail. After sailing it for a year (single handed) I can engage the wheel brake and set the sail, then by walking along either rail I can alter heading. RAGGEDY MAN is a joy to sail. Like everything else in life it has pros and cons. 6' draft does require a bit of attention but as long as I am careful I stay out of trouble, not that I haven't run aground a couple of times. I roll up my jib, start the engine and back it off. Most people that come below cant believe it's a 34'. I will be moving on board in a year or so and spending my winters here in south Texas and summers on the north east coast (single handed). With a bit more potable water and some electrical upgrades it will be a great live aboard. Feel free to contact me
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Old 22-11-2008, 21:03   #4
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Yeah! There's a few of us on here. I stole a 40" OIR and have invested twice as much as I paid for it. I work a little on it and sail a little to try out the up grades.

After 5 years It's about ready for that TransPac, just a coupe more major things and she's ready to go. Deep keel is OK here in the Pacific and even better in the S.Pac. A bit more info later, the woman says it's time to eat!
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Old 22-11-2008, 21:03   #5
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There is a big difference between a racer/cruiser and a stripped down racer. Many of the racing boats are built to minimal standards and designed to be light weight with deep draft and high aspect rigging. They are basically a hull and rigging with the hull built with as little material that the builder could get away with to support the masts. These are not really the best choice for a cruising boat but to each his own. The old IOR boats are the exception.
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Old 22-11-2008, 22:11   #6
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Continued...... My story

Like Chuck said the older IOR's are the exception, for the most part. I'm sure there was some bad work done in those days.

Mine was hand built over a frame, then flipped over and the deck/cockpit attached to an over-lapped seam. Now they come out of a mold.

I'm not sure I'd consider a new racer. I've heard of too many keels falling off or rigging coming down. Even some breaking in half and sinking within a minute or so.

When I got mine is was one of those worked hard and put away wet. But the hull is strong as hell. I keep mine on the hard and when she's launched they just pick it up with a big fork truck and drop'r in. Not once has it ever shown any sign of oil-canning. Here's a picture of her first lift.



Racers don't really make good off-shore boats due to being built light to keep the wetted surface down. Rail meat was their means of ballast so any time you have full sail up in any thing over 20 knots of wind they want to heel over too far. One of the major things I need to do on mine is add a 1000# bulb to my keel. That'll bring her weight up and keep her upright better. But in 40 years out on the water I've never been sea sick (crossing my fingers ).

She started out at 14,000# and now she's up to 16,000. With another 1000# it'll giver her a little more stability. The average 40' sailer runs at about 20,000#.

But after 25 year of her being in the racing fleet she still doesn't show any stress in the hull. The deck is starting to leak at the seam a little (old sealer) but thats the other major thing left. I'm going to glass it over, add a 1" high X 3" wide Mahogany rail, glass over that and add a new T-track on top of that with another row of fasteners between the old ones.

If you want to know what your in for check out my latest refit. Cockpit Project of an Old Racer also check out my photo's in the Gallery.

It took me all summer and $3000 worth of materials to finish the cockpit, not including the dodger and bimini. But she's the way I want her and I know every little inch of this boat, good or bad.

If your not up to the labor the best thing is to pay the full price for a boat that is already built for what you want. I'm a Craftsman so I enjoy the fruits of my labor. The cost is going to be about the same in the end but at least the bank doesn't own any part of it. Save a little, sail a little & spend a little, no interest payments!

To each his own! End of story!

Oh yeah! Check out Weyalan's too.
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Old 22-11-2008, 22:20   #7
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BTW

The large sail inventories are probably trash and the insides are only set up for a crew, not convenience.

You'll find wires and holes that go nowhere and the water and fuel will be minimal. Not much for storage compartments either. That's what race boats are made of.
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Old 23-11-2008, 04:37   #8
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My boat was a semi-custom "racing" version of a production racer/cruiser. It has a totally different deck/cockpit/cabin trunk molding, and the interior arrangements are different in the bow and stern, although in the center of the boat (main salon, and head compartment) it is the same as the regular production version (except perhaps for the actual plumbing). The hull is the same, although I think they may have taken more care in the layup and stiffening of mine.

Peterson 34 GREYHAWK
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Old 23-11-2008, 07:29   #9
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The really modern race boats have keels and rudders which are high aspect ratio, and quite unforgiving--expect problems with control. The older race boats probably need new tankage to bring capacity up to minimum of 50 gal fuel and 100 gal water. They will all need need more stowage capacity, and probably better sound insulation around the motor.

The best plan would be to sail the boat over to Thailand in the race configuration and have it rebuilt there for less than you could do it yourself in the US or Canada.
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Old 23-11-2008, 14:09   #10
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I bought a 1983/84 IOR "1-tonner" - a 40' racing boat. I am slowly converting it to be more cruising orientated.

You can find lots of details of this slow process in this thread:
http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/...-mad-2654.html

As has already be pointed out, buying an older racing boat is a very cheap option to get you out on the water and crusing, but you do end up spending a lot of time and money on the conversion, so that in the longer run, it is probably not really any cheaper than buying a fitted out cruising boat. But it does allow you to get a boat and get out and enjoy it for a relatively small outlay, and allows you to set the pace of the refit according to your time and available budget. If I wanted to buy a fitted out cruising boat, I would still be saving and boatless. I have been having fun on my boat for almost 3 years now. Je ne regret rien!
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Old 23-11-2008, 15:51   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weyalan View Post
As has already be pointed out, buying an older racing boat is a very cheap option to get you out on the water and crusing, but you do end up spending a lot of time and money on the conversion, so that in the longer run, it is probably not really any cheaper than buying a fitted out cruising boat. But it does allow you to get a boat and get out and enjoy it for a relatively small outlay, and allows you to set the pace of the refit according to your time and available budget.
In addition, since a lot of racing boats are essentially "open-concept" below, with typically minimal systems, going this route allows you to customize almost everything to be exactly as YOU would like it. Buying an already fitted-out cruising boat, you're "stuck" with the choices that OTHERS have already made for you as to equipment, installation, etc... Besides, as I'm sure Delmarrey and Weyalan would probably agree, the refit process can be fun in and of itself, maybe even worth the price of admission!
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Old 23-11-2008, 16:30   #12
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Indeed; I really enjoy the refit process (even grinding fibreglass and sanding filler... honest). Doing the refit yourself, you get to know pretty much every inch of your boat and you know the quality of your work. You don't need to be a master builder, carpenter or shipwright to do a lot of the work yourself, just be prepared to take your time and lots of care and , if necessary be prepared to make mistakes and fix them.
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Old 23-11-2008, 17:40   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weyalan View Post
Indeed; You don't need to be a master builder, carpenter or shipwright to do a lot of the work yourself, just be prepared to take your time and lots of care and , if necessary be prepared to make mistakes and fix them.
One can always tell how good a craftsman is by how well their able to cover up the mistakes. Believe me, the good ones do make mistakes, just not very often.

Pre-plan everything, and do the research before hand for materials, tooling & cost. If one cheats on quality, one cheats on them self!
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Old 23-11-2008, 20:42   #14
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For example: If fabricating large panels or structures, make sure it is actually physically possible to get them into the boat.... ummm
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Old 01-12-2008, 19:15   #15
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Nice looking boat Delmarrey

Yes it looks built heavy duty. Stiff enough for the fork lift to lift and
not hurt it.
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