Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 07-04-2016, 20:18   #31
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 22
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
I think its fine for Puget Sound! But I think of Puget Sound as requiring a good bit of motoring fairly often. How much gas can you store for that outboard? BTW I think 6k may be a tad high for that. That Alberg 30 is a great design, if it is in good shape and a good diesel... you can always make an offer...
Here is the Alberg 30:
https://oregoncoast.craigslist.org/boa/5520313840.html

It sounds like it is in good shape with a good diesel but hard to tell from pictures. I may make an offer but that is a fairly long drive for a boat that far out of my price range.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vjm View Post
It's not the boat. It's the sailor. If you have the skills, you can get around the world in some extremely "not fit for bluewater" designs. If you don't, the boat is not going to take care of you.

I actually think a Cumulus is an ok choice. Wouldn't be mine for a variety of reasons
(the draft is a touch too deep for me, the beam is too wide for me, the low SA/D ratio is not exciting, I am not a fan of skinny fin keel for around the world type stuff, especially when the rudder hangs lower than the keel, it's more racer than cruiser so I don't know if tankage is adequate, etc) but frankly that doesn't matter. They sail well supposedly, Norlin is a good designer, and Albin had decent construction.

Any boat of any kind that has sat unused outside for years should be approached with extreme caution. Unless you see it in the flesh (or preferably your surveyor) there is no way to offer any meaningful opinion on it. This boat seems to need some big ticket and/or labor intensive items. An outboard on a transom for a boat designed for an inboard, especially a nimble boat, is just totally silly to me. It will be a rotten experience and negatively impact performance. So that means a new engine. That's 8k on the absolute lowest and much more likely 10-12k. So now you can't sell it for what you have in it, not even close. Sails? Let's be cheap and say 3k. Rigging? If you do it? 1500 and a lot of time.

The lack of an inboard and regular maintenece make this a very undesirable boat for most people. So resale is probably not happening, or its at an extremely low give away price. Once you buy it, you are stuck with it. I think that's a poor choice for people who don't know if they like sailing, if they like racing or crusing, if they like fin keels, if they do a lot of engineless sailing, etc.

My comment about consumerism is not calling you a consumerist. It's a comment on our culture that repeatedly says the first thing you do in any situation is buy something. Not learn, not ask questions, not grow naturally into the sport, just acquire. I think that's the wrong way to go. Glad to hear you do too.

There are so many good boats out there extremely cheap that I think you can do a lot better than one that has been neglected and has major, expensive components missing.

Think about the next five years. What do you absolutely know you will do with a boat in that time period? Buy a boat to do that. It sounds like learn to sail and do some light cruising. Great. Buy that boat, in decent condition. When and if your plans change then evaluate again. Way too many people buy a boat to fulfill a "someday" plan, when it is inappropriate for the now. A Cumulus sounds fine for your near term goals (although 28' is a big learner boat), but this one probably isn't it.
Your comments about the outboard negatively impacting performance is something I will have to consider. That sounds like something where I would err on the side of performance instead of value. It seems the consensus is that this outboard setup will not work well enough offshore to be useful. That doesn't change my mind about the boat much since I can easily sell an outboard and my plan has always been to put a new inboard in the boat if I end up with it.

The inboard engine prices you quoted seem high as I've looked on craig's list and found many under $3k and ones you can rebuild for under $1k. Or do you recommend only installing a new engine and avoiding used? I was also wondering how much it will roughly cost to rent a crane for a day? By the way I am still considering an electric propulsion system which would cost under $3k if I do it myself but would obviously not be much help for resale. Though as I stated before I could probably recoup most of the money from the components for an electric propulsion system if I sell the boat without it.

I understand what you are saying about resale value and being stuck with a boat that I may not like. After listening to all of your advice and warnings I will skip a sea trial and move onto looking at another boat unless this boat shows very well when I take a look in the next few days.


In any of your opinions would there be any price at which this boat would be worth refitting for long passages?

I've also come up with a question since reading more on electric propulsion systems that I think will help evaluate whether it will work for me. How many nautical miles range and what speed would all of you consider adequate for safety reasons on long passages? I am mostly worried about avoiding storms. Please assume when answering that the boat has a full electronics package including radar and weather report access to give you early warning.

Thanks again everyone for the advice and information. I will post a list of candidates soon followed by pictures of the boat and my notes on it.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
__________________

__________________
SV Finster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2016, 20:39   #32
Marine Service Provider
 
boatpoker's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Toronto, Ontario or Bahamas
Boat: Benford 38 Fantail Cruiser
Posts: 2,593
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Albin Cumulus were selling for $6k to $7k in 2009-2010 and they all had working inboard diesels (per soldboats.com). Price for the boat you describe would be in the $1k - $2k range. To make it a $7k boat you'd have to spend $15k. To make it ready for circumnavigation, add another $20k, cause it doesn't sound like your wife is into the Pardey thing. ..... after all that you'd still end up with a $7k boat .... thats just the way the boat market works.

May I suggest a little general education on how to inspect a boat. Marine Survey 101
__________________

__________________
That hysterical laughter you hear as you sail a way in your "new" boat ..... is the seller.
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2016, 21:44   #34
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 22
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Quote:
Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
Albin Cumulus were selling for $6k to $7k in 2009-2010 and they all had working inboard diesels (per soldboats.com). Price for the boat you describe would be in the $1k - $2k range. To make it a $7k boat you'd have to spend $15k. To make it ready for circumnavigation, add another $20k, cause it doesn't sound like your wife is into the Pardey thing. ..... after all that you'd still end up with a $7k boat .... thats just the way the boat market works.

May I suggest a little general education on how to inspect a boat. Marine Survey 101
Thank you for looking that up for me as it really helps my decision making. That low resale value really scares me off. I will still take a look but unless the owner is willing to come way down or has described the boat incorrectly than I won't be interested in this boat. After this discussion it seems I will likely be spending a bit less and looking for a cheaper smaller coastal cruiser. That is unless something comes up before I find one of those I like.

I have read that page before and was planning on using the checklist when I do my own survey. I do appreciate the helpful advice from everyone even if I don't always want to hear it

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
__________________
SV Finster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2016, 21:51   #35
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 22
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

I forgot one on my list of candidates:

Cheoy Lee 31 Offshore
http://www.sailboatlistings.com/view/56742


Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
__________________
SV Finster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 04:05   #36
vjm
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 313
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

You can't avoid storms if you are offshore cruising. Get that out of your head. Speed is a function of waterline length, so any differences between two 27-30 foot boats set up for offshore sailing are pretty minimal. Once you are loaded up with stores and spares, your speed drops again. A higher SA/D ratio can certainly help, but that has its own set of compromises. Sailing is going places at walking speed. Weather overtakes you, especially big systems.

Taking at least ASA 101 and 103 will get you off on the right foot and assure you are practicing correctly and have the skills to stay safe while doing so. If you are dead set against lessons of any kind, then buy a small, cheap coastal cruiser and have at it. Make sure you figure out how much it is going to cost you and whether there is a wait list in your area. That list is a real mix of boats, so study up on what a coastal cruiser is and what you need in your area. Again, lessons provide an entree to sailors in your area and that is where the best boats are sold, not on Craigslist.
__________________
vjm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 07:14   #37
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Chesapeake Bay
Boat: Alberg #0
Posts: 268
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

That Alberg30 sure looks sweet. I paid 8k but they were asking more than the one linked to here. Dont be afraid to lowball something you can afford. All they can do is say no :-)

Sent from my SM-G925T using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
__________________
pickpaul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 07:53   #38
Registered User
 
Lizzy Belle's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Netherlands
Boat: Ohlson 29
Posts: 1,522
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Quote:
Originally Posted by SV Finster View Post
Here is a list of candidates:
//
I know that almost none of these appear an anyone's bluewater boat list but in my budget in my area this is all I have found.
Why only shop close to home?
They're boats ... they can be moved (over land or water)

There's some nice boats in there, and some not-so-nice.
Avoid ads where the seller can't be bothered to post a few pics.

As to your list: those are pretty much all boats within your budget, I assume.
Do you have a MUST HAVE and NICE TO HAVE list? Without knowing what you want, you can't select boats.

As an example, some things I had on my MUST HAVE list (and I skipped neglected boats, I only looked at boats that were cared for):
Keel stepped mast, rudder on skeg, L or U shaped galley, deep & comfy cockpit (no traveler in the middle etc), long & wide settees that are comfortable both as settee and bunk (no dinette!), well maintained engine that can be easily accessed, ready or easily adjusted for solo sailing - etc.
This is just an example, you need to think about what matters to you and yours.
I also would have liked the head to be near the entrance and not near the V-berth, but I compromised on that (it was on my 'Nice' list, not on the 'Dealbreakers' list).

I looked for reasonably fast cruisers that was designed and built to be sailed at sea. The Ohlson 29 (racer / cruiser) was on my list, but above budget. I ended up with mine for a steal due to a crappy paint job on the hull. Easy and cheap to fix, but made her even harder to sell so I offered a very low price (with a clear motivation and calculation) and had my offer accepted.

My boat would also not be on anyone's "BLUE WATER" list -- hardly anything under 40' is these days -- but she can handle it. I worry a lot more about my capabilities then hers.

I also looked at boats that had some blisters - osmosis scares the crap out of people and the value of a boat with blisters drops like a stone, even when just in the easy-to-fix early stages. That was the only type of "project boat" I was willing to consider.

The Cumulus will probably never be worth it - I wouldn't even consider her, but since you seem unable to write her off: Judging by the pics and short description only I'd offer a max of $1k, and that's only if the sails and rigging etc. are any good, which I seriously doubt - and depending on what sails are included (the owner is unclear about that for some reason).
Like boatpoker said: she'll cost you double or (more likely) triple what she's worth to get her ready. Money much better spent on another boat ...
__________________
"Il faut Ítre toujours ivre." - Charles Baudelaire
Dutch ♀ Liveaboard, sharing an Ohlson 29 with a feline.
Lizzy Belle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 09:23   #39
Moderator
 
Don C L's Avatar

Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Channel Islands, CA
Boat: 1962 Columbia 29 MK 1 #37
Posts: 4,395
Images: 34
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

The Cape Dory 28 if it has a good diesel is the one that I'd pick, but others could be good too. I agree the Alberg 30 down in Newport is a bit far to be considering. Really, take a good look at the diesels... that can make or break a boat. Even though I have an outboard, it works ok for me, but in most cases hanging one on the transom is not a good bluewater plan. However the set-up that James Baldwin built into the Triton and some others for outboards is a good one, and actually in some ways better than a diesel IMO.
__________________
DL
Pythagoras
1962 Columbia 29 MKI #37
Don C L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 09:34   #40
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 22
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Quote:
Originally Posted by vjm View Post
You can't avoid storms if you are offshore cruising. Get that out of your head. Speed is a function of waterline length, so any differences between two 27-30 foot boats set up for offshore sailing are pretty minimal. Once you are loaded up with stores and spares, your speed drops again. A higher SA/D ratio can certainly help, but that has its own set of compromises. Sailing is going places at walking speed. Weather overtakes you, especially big systems.

Taking at least ASA 101 and 103 will get you off on the right foot and assure you are practicing correctly and have the skills to stay safe while doing so. If you are dead set against lessons of any kind, then buy a small, cheap coastal cruiser and have at it. Make sure you figure out how much it is going to cost you and whether there is a wait list in your area. That list is a real mix of boats, so study up on what a coastal cruiser is and what you need in your area. Again, lessons provide an entree to sailors in your area and that is where the best boats are sold, not on Craigslist.
So when you see a storm coming while offshore you don't try to avoid the brunt of it? Do you not change course at all even if your course sends you through the middle of a storm? I do understand not being able to completely avoid a storm while offshore and am listening to your advice. It just seemed like storms are the main reasons that a motor is needed while offshore besides when there is a lack of wind. If this isn't true than going engineless may end up being the way to go for us.

I may take a sailing course but was planning on skipping one and relying on my sister to teach me since she and her husband cruised on their 40"+ cutter decades ago. I didn't realize that boats weren't advertised for sale and that word of mouth was the best way to find boats. In that case I may need to take some classes just to find a boat. Are there other good ways to get information on possible boats besides taking classes? Crewing for a race team has been mentioned as a way to get experience and meet sailors. Are there other good ways to get myself out there to meet people?

As far as the list of boats goes I know that I posted a mix of them as I tried to be generous in order to give a decent selection. My short list is the Cape Dory 28 and the Aphrodite 101 both of which have shortcomings when it comes to meeting our criteria. The cape dory as I mentioned is a bit slower than I would like while the Aphrodite doesn't have the space for a gimbaled stove and oven or a separate enclosed head. I haven't quite moved onto looking at coastal cruisers yet as that will require more research first on my part. I don't know which boats will be best for my needs on the puget sound as that wasn't my main concern.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pickpaul View Post
That Alberg30 sure looks sweet. I paid 8k but they were asking more than the one linked to here. Dont be afraid to lowball something you can afford. All they can do is say no :-)

Sent from my SM-G925T using Cruisers Sailing Forum mobile app
I will try the owner and give it a shot when I know I will have the time to make it down there to take a look at her in person. Thanks for the encouragement


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizzy Belle View Post
Why only shop close to home?
They're boats ... they can be moved (over land or water)

There's some nice boats in there, and some not-so-nice.
Avoid ads where the seller can't be bothered to post a few pics.

As to your list: those are pretty much all boats within your budget, I assume.
Do you have a MUST HAVE and NICE TO HAVE list? Without knowing what you want, you can't select boats.

As an example, some things I had on my MUST HAVE list (and I skipped neglected boats, I only looked at boats that were cared for):
Keel stepped mast, rudder on skeg, L or U shaped galley, deep & comfy cockpit (no traveler in the middle etc), long & wide settees that are comfortable both as settee and bunk (no dinette!), well maintained engine that can be easily accessed, ready or easily adjusted for solo sailing - etc.
This is just an example, you need to think about what matters to you and yours.
I also would have liked the head to be near the entrance and not near the V-berth, but I compromised on that (it was on my 'Nice' list, not on the 'Dealbreakers' list).

I looked for reasonably fast cruisers that was designed and built to be sailed at sea. The Ohlson 29 (racer / cruiser) was on my list, but above budget. I ended up with mine for a steal due to a crappy paint job on the hull. Easy and cheap to fix, but made her even harder to sell so I offered a very low price (with a clear motivation and calculation) and had my offer accepted.

My boat would also not be on anyone's "BLUE WATER" list -- hardly anything under 40' is these days -- but she can handle it. I worry a lot more about my capabilities then hers.

I also looked at boats that had some blisters - osmosis scares the crap out of people and the value of a boat with blisters drops like a stone, even when just in the easy-to-fix early stages. That was the only type of "project boat" I was willing to consider.

The Cumulus will probably never be worth it - I wouldn't even consider her, but since you seem unable to write her off: Judging by the pics and short description only I'd offer a max of $1k, and that's only if the sails and rigging etc. are any good, which I seriously doubt - and depending on what sails are included (the owner is unclear about that for some reason).
Like boatpoker said: she'll cost you double or (more likely) triple what she's worth to get her ready. Money much better spent on another boat ...
The reason I want to stick close to home is my lack of experience sailing. I don't feel safe delivering a boat home from anywhere south of the cape of mendocino in northern California. If I were to truck a boat home or pay a delivery skipper than that would cut deeply into my boat budget.

My must have list is pretty much nonexistent at this point as any boat worth sailing offshore anytime in the future will meet it. My wish list is to have an enclosed separate head, a stove with oven, a fast boat in many conditions, a boat with good pointing ability and a good table or dinette area for meals or work. My nice to have list is a shower, a watermaker, a full electronics package, power generation equipment, and a second sleeping cabin separate from the v-berth. I'm sure that I've missed some things that I will think of later but that's most of what I'm looking for in a boat.

As far as the cumulus goes I don't think that this is the boat that I will circumnavigate on. If I do somehow still like the boat after seeing her in person than I will do as thorough a survey as I can after a sea trial and won't pay over $2k. I appreciate all of the advice and apologize for my stubbornness but I've read enough threads on boats to see that almost every boat brought up as a possible bluewater cruiser has a naysayer. In this case there were far more naysayers with good logical points so I will defer to those with more experience. Thanks and I appreciate all of the advice.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
__________________
SV Finster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 09:59   #41
vjm
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 313
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Quote:
Originally Posted by SV Finster View Post
So when you see a storm coming while offshore you don't try to avoid the brunt of it? Do you not change course at all even if your course sends you through the middle of a storm? I do understand not being able to completely avoid a storm while offshore and am listening to your advice. It just seemed like storms are the main reasons that a motor is needed while offshore besides when there is a lack of wind. If this isn't true than going engineless may end up being the way to go for us.

I may take a sailing course but was planning on skipping one and relying on my sister to teach me since she and her husband cruised on their 40"+ cutter decades ago. I didn't realize that boats weren't advertised for sale and that word of mouth was the best way to find boats. In that case I may need to take some classes just to find a boat. Are there other good ways to get information on possible boats besides taking classes? Crewing for a race team has been mentioned as a way to get experience and meet sailors. Are there other good ways to get myself out there to meet people?



Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
If you can see a storm offshore the chances of being to sail fast enough to get away from it are very low. You can get GRIB files and such while offshore to help you select a best route.

I strongly recommend taking a class or two and then crewing. That goes for both you and your wife. Some couples do better taking separate classes and crewing separately, some do better together. That will allow you to meet a lot of people, look at a lot of boats, and sail on a lot of boats. After a year or two of that, you will have a much better picture of what you are considering, what the two of you enjoy, what you want in a boat, what you can't tolerate, and will have some great contacts to get the word out that you are looking. If you get interested in a certain kind of boat, join the owner's group online and see if you can catch a ride with someone and talk to them about it. Sailors are really nice about that.

If your sister can teach you, that's great. I would still think you two would benefit from contact with sailors and the easiest way to do that is by crewing, so find someplace close to you that has races and join in. There are so many boats out there it will blow your mind. Virtually all of them can be taken around the world; the less "sea-worthy" designs just need a stronger sailor with a higher discomfort tolerance.

Good luck to you both! It's a great sport and I am sure you will really enjoy it, no matter how you go about it.
__________________
vjm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 10:05   #42
Registered User
 
Lizzy Belle's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Netherlands
Boat: Ohlson 29
Posts: 1,522
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Quote:
Originally Posted by SV Finster View Post
My must have list is pretty much nonexistent at this point as any boat worth sailing offshore anytime in the future will meet it.
Before you buy a boat, you may want to actually get out on some different types of boats ...

Go and find some boats to crew on and get at least some basic idea about what you need and want in order to be somewhat comfy on a boat.

Your nice-lists sounds like you'll be sailing a 40'+ footer with all the creature comforts, bells and whistles ... while in reality you're buying a small project boat and have to sleep in the V-berth at sea because you consider an oven more important then a decent layout ...

As to an engine: while you can go without one, be aware that docking, anchoring and maneuvering in general without one isn't as easy (or fun) as you might think. Nor is escaping doldrums etc.
__________________
"Il faut Ítre toujours ivre." - Charles Baudelaire
Dutch ♀ Liveaboard, sharing an Ohlson 29 with a feline.
Lizzy Belle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 10:36   #43
Registered User

Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Olympia, WA
Posts: 22
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Quote:
Originally Posted by Don C L View Post
The Cape Dory 28 if it has a good diesel is the one that I'd pick, but others could be good too. I agree the Alberg 30 down in Newport is a bit far to be considering. Really, take a good look at the diesels... that can make or break a boat. Even though I have an outboard, it works ok for me, but in most cases hanging one on the transom is not a good bluewater plan. However the set-up that James Baldwin built into the Triton and some others for outboards is a good one, and actually in some ways better than a diesel IMO.
It's hard to say with the cape dory about whether it's diesel is good. When I talked to the person selling the boat for charity they said it had been winterized before it was donated so I would have to buy it without knowing whether it ran for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vjm View Post
If you can see a storm offshore the chances of being to sail fast enough to get away from it are very low. You can get GRIB files and such while offshore to help you select a best route.

I strongly recommend taking a class or two and then crewing. That goes for both you and your wife. Some couples do better taking separate classes and crewing separately, some do better together. That will allow you to meet a lot of people, look at a lot of boats, and sail on a lot of boats. After a year or two of that, you will have a much better picture of what you are considering, what the two of you enjoy, what you want in a boat, what you can't tolerate, and will have some great contacts to get the word out that you are looking. If you get interested in a certain kind of boat, join the owner's group online and see if you can catch a ride with someone and talk to them about it. Sailors are really nice about that.

If your sister can teach you, that's great. I would still think you two would benefit from contact with sailors and the easiest way to do that is by crewing, so find someplace close to you that has races and join in. There are so many boats out there it will blow your mind. Virtually all of them can be taken around the world; the less "sea-worthy" designs just need a stronger sailor with a higher discomfort tolerance.

Good luck to you both! It's a great sport and I am sure you will really enjoy it, no matter how you go about it.
Are you saying that in order to crew I would need to take classes? Also what is the best way of getting a spot as crew? Should I simply stalk a boat owner I see racing and approach them after they dock? Your approach may be the most cost effective way of going about our dream of circumnavigation but I'm not sure it's the way we will approach it. I do appreciate your advice and am probably going to take some of it


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizzy Belle View Post
Before you buy a boat, you may want to actually get out on some different types of boats ...

Go and find some boats to crew on and get at least some basic idea about what you need and want in order to be somewhat comfy on a boat.

Your nice-lists sounds like you'll be sailing a 40'+ footer with all the creature comforts, bells and whistles ... while in reality you're buying a small project boat and have to sleep in the V-berth at sea because you consider an oven more important then a decent layout ...
I would love to join a crew and sail on different boats and if I knew how to go about doing this than I would. You guys make it sound so simple but I've responded to every ad looking for crew that fits my schedule and budget. I understand that inexperienced crew are unwanted which is part of the reason why getting a boat for experience seems like a good idea.

My nice list was supposed to be very low priority and my wish list was supposed be much higher priority. I don't consider an oven more important than a decent layout but with only two adults and a small child at sea I believe most layouts will accommodate our needs. I assume one adult on watch at a time with the other sleeping on a bench with our daughter sleeping in the quarter berth. If this seems like an issue than I may need to prioritize sleeping quarters a bit higher.


Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
__________________
SV Finster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 10:47   #44
Registered User
 
Lizzy Belle's Avatar

Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Netherlands
Boat: Ohlson 29
Posts: 1,522
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

Quote:
Originally Posted by SV Finster View Post
I would love to join a crew and sail on different boats and if I knew how to go about doing this than I would. You guys make it sound so simple
Go to a local marina, talk to boat owners there ... look for a sailing club or something in your area ... Place an ad in the Crew Available section on this forum ... Join some crewing websites ...
__________________
"Il faut Ítre toujours ivre." - Charles Baudelaire
Dutch ♀ Liveaboard, sharing an Ohlson 29 with a feline.
Lizzy Belle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2016, 11:27   #45
vjm
Registered User

Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 313
Re: Advice on Albin Cumulus

You can crew without taking classes, and Lizzie is right about how to do that. Showing up on race day with a six pack of decent beer is really helpful as many people cancel last minute.

I think knowing something about sailing prior to crewing is helpful both to you and to the skipper who may take you on, but try just showing up first and seeing how it goes. I also find sailing teachers often can help you move to a crew position, depending on where they teach and who they know.
__________________

__________________
vjm is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale: Albin Vega 27 Bill NH Classifieds Archive 8 22-08-2009 11:52
Albin Vega unbusted67 Monohull Sailboats 19 16-08-2009 05:12
Albin Vega 3 blade prop recommendations? Chief Engineer Propellers & Drive Systems 1 29-09-2008 09:16
Albin Vega 27 for sale Bill NH Classifieds Archive 0 14-09-2008 09:00



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:55.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.