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Old 11-11-2012, 19:56   #16
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Re: Advice

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Originally Posted by sv Winterlude View Post
John Vigor's book mentioned above is also great -- in Portobello, Panama, we met a family from England, a mom, dad and 2 boys- aged maybe 10 and 8 sailing around the world on a 27 foot boat, might have been a Bristol 27. We met a late 20's couple in the San Blas Islands, Panama -- they were on their way through the canal to the South Pacific and that was two years ago. Go for it!

There's a Cape Dory older ketch for sale in our marina in SW Florida, but Yachtworld.com is down this evening, not sure how much. Do the homework. Maybe it would be best to relocate based on where you find the right boat, on the other hand, we meet a lot of cruisers from Texas.

There's no right or wrong answers, only what you find with your research that meets your criteria! If you don't know anything about electronics or diesel engines or refrigeration, learn now -- community colleges often have classes costing next to nothing -- wish we would have taken a couple before we left! On the other hand, there are always other cruisers with specific skills usually willing to help out.

Cruising is a wonderful community as I'm sure you'll find out soon!
Winterlude, thank you for this response. I will definitely be looking into community colleges.

Do we have to buy the boat where we live? Could we buy the boat somewhere else and sail it/have someone sail it for us?
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:00   #17
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Re: Advice

I would like to encourage you to keep working toward realizing your dream. I do have some questions and then some advice from someone trying to live the life you desire. What skills do you currently have that you feel could be an asset to your new life? There is this wonderful/nasty expectation that cruisers help cruisers for free. So my ability to repair electrical systems, diesel engines, refrigeration and almost anything else on a boat ends up being more of a charity than an asset. Sure everybody loves you but love doesn't bring in an income. So that said, we have opted to spend the summer where there is a lot of seasonal jobs (for us Alaska) and then our intent is to go somewhere in the winter with the money we made, and do it all over the next year. We have not realized this yet, we are still working and upgrading the boat but hope to start this migration in about a year. We have met couples that will fly back home after hauling out their boat to restock their cruising kitty. The good news is that if done right living aboard is very reasonable and allows one to save a lot of money. Hope that helped.
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:07   #18
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Re: Advice

Lysander,
I don't mean to be negative but take some classes, rent a boat, sail with some friends, something so you have a clue as to what you are trying to do. It's not rocket science but there is a lot to learn and while "learning under pressure" works to reinforce a lesson, learning to reef when you're hanging on by your toenails and hoping the rig doesn't fall on your head is not a lot of fun.
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:10   #19
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Re: Advice

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Lysander,
learning to reef when you're hanging on by your toenails and hoping the rig doesn't fall on your head is not a lot of fun.
I can relate to that.... It does make for good laughs after its over though.
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:11   #20
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Re: Advice

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Lysander,
I don't mean to be negative but take some classes, rent a boat, sail with some friends, something so you have a clue as to what you are trying to do. It's not rocket science but there is a lot to learn and while "learning under pressure" works to reinforce a lesson, learning to reef when you're hanging on by your toenails and hoping the rig doesn't fall on your head is not a lot of fun.
Sailronin,

we intend to take sailing classes as soon as Winter clears up here. We would not begin sailing on our own until we both felt confident.

We may be dreamers, but we still have some sense in our heads
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:16   #21
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Re: Advice

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I would like to encourage you to keep working toward realizing your dream. I do have some questions and then some advice from someone trying to live the life you desire. What skills do you currently have that you feel could be an asset to your new life? There is this wonderful/nasty expectation that cruisers help cruisers for free. So my ability to repair electrical systems, diesel engines, refrigeration and almost anything else on a boat ends up being more of a charity than an asset. Sure everybody loves you but love doesn't bring in an income. So that said, we have opted to spend the summer where there is a lot of seasonal jobs (for us Alaska) and then our intent is to go somewhere in the winter with the money we made, and do it all over the next year. We have not realized this yet, we are still working and upgrading the boat but hope to start this migration in about a year. We have met couples that will fly back home after hauling out their boat to restock their cruising kitty. The good news is that if done right living aboard is very reasonable and allows one to save a lot of money. Hope that helped.
Unfortunately I was not raised to be good with my hands. All of my education has been Liberal Arts/Theory based. Those things are what I enjoy, but of course they can't help me fix an engine. I'm a very skilled writer, and I am a quick learner (and eager at that).

I don't intend to beg people for charity unless absolutely necessary. Both my wife and I want to feel prepared before we head out to the unknown; I don't want to be a burden on the cruising community.

I like this idea of seasonal work. My wife and I are very frugal people. We have no debt and we like to save. We intend to keep it that way. What are some ways that we could earn a living which you may have experience with?

Thank you.
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:24   #22
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Re: Advice

My point in bringing up the cruisers helping cruisers was not to suggest you or anyone else is looking for charity, just that having those skill does not always make you money. Now writing could be a source of income, researching options there would be a good thing to do.
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:29   #23
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Re: Advice

Lysander- take some time and, as others have suggested, browse and search through this forum. Check out sailnet.com too. There is a lot of accumulated wisdom and even if it doesn't answer all your questions, it will give you ideas and you'll learn what the important questions are. They are probably different for different people. Take note of boats that people discuss as being appropriate for the kind of sailing you're interested in doing. Research those boats on the internet, get an idea of what you think would be a good boat for you would cost.

Buy some books, read about what others have done. Take a look at this website: Atom Voyages - Home, the author has sailed around the world twice on a 28 ft boat. One that he modified extensively. He has a number of good informative articles on his site.

Don'r rush into it. Consider buying a simple inexpensive boat that you can learn to sail on first. You might get some ideas of what you want, and the kind of work that's involved. And you'll probably meet other sailors who can give you advice, information, tips, etc...

Good luck.
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:35   #24
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Re: Advice

Hi there,

Firstly keep aiming towards your dreams! Never let anyone tell you something can't be done.
However having said that also be realistic. You want to be Safe, epirbs, fitting out the boat for blue water, etc, isn't cheap, you want to be prepaired (sailing classes are not cheap either).

Persoanlly if it were me in your situation I'd travel the world as crew members. Pick up a load of experience, use other people's boats while you learn and grow. I understand the draw of doing this on your own with your wife- it's my dream also, but if you really can't wait to save more maybe crewing your way around the globe is a more realistic path?

All the best whatever you decide to do!
Simon
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:35   #25
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Re: Advice

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Originally Posted by saw77 View Post
Lysander- take some time and, as others have suggested, browse and search through this forum. Check out sailnet.com too. There is a lot of accumulated wisdom and even if it doesn't answer all your questions, it will give you ideas and you'll learn what the important questions are. They are probably different for different people. Take note of boats that people discuss as being appropriate for the kind of sailing you're interested in doing. Research those boats on the internet, get an idea of what you think would be a good boat for you would cost.

Buy some books, read about what others have done. Take a look at this website: Atom Voyages - Home, the author has sailed around the world twice on a 28 ft boat. One that he modified extensively. He has a number of good informative articles on his site.

Don'r rush into it. Consider buying a simple inexpensive boat that you can learn to sail on first. You might get some ideas of what you want, and the kind of work that's involved. And you'll probably meet other sailors who can give you advice, information, tips, etc...

Good luck.
saw, thanks for the response.

I have done a lot of research. I'm familiar with the atom voyage website, and have visited it frequently.

Despite all of my time spent however, I still do not know where to begin. I am still standing on the start line. I have looked at a variety of boats, and I have read 1001 things about them. Everyone has a different opinion however, and while this may be a good thing for some, it is difficult for a complete novice to discern.

Originally we were considering a Westsail 32, however we now realize that these are outside of our budget most likely.

The current favorite is a Pearson 30 or a Pearson Vanguard. However, like I said, I base this solely on what I have been able to guess from forums.

We intend to live aboard this thing for a long time.
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:37   #26
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Re: Advice

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Hi there,

Firstly keep aiming towards your dreams! Never let anyone tell you something can't be done.
However having said that also be realistic. You want to be Safe, epirbs, fitting out the boat for blue water, etc, isn't cheap, you want to be prepaired (sailing classes are not cheap either).

Persoanlly if it were me in your situation I'd travel the world as crew members. Pick up a load of experience, use other people's boats while you learn and grow. I understand the draw of doing this on your own with your wife- it's my dream also, but if you really can't wait to save more maybe crewing your way around the globe is a more realistic path?

All the best whatever you decide to do!
Simon
Thanks for the reply.

Who would want a husband and wife crew with no experience though?
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:44   #27
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Re: Advice

You'd be surprised. As long as you're both keen to learn and are nice people to be around you'll soon find boats looking for crew.

Use your money to get to an area with lots of boats sailing south for example, take some courses, get known around the sailing clubs, buy a few drinks and get your faces shown and get your names on the wall as willing to learn crew. If you're keen to learn, have a good attitue, can cook (great skill to have!), etc, it will happen.

Regards,
Simon
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Old 11-11-2012, 20:53   #28
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Re: Advice

You may want to look at Solo Around the America's Under Sail | An audacious attempt at sailing the Northwest Passage and circumnavigating entirety of both continents, to benefit Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating . Matt Rutherford went around both North and South America in a 27' Albin Vega. Very sea worthy, and inexpensive.
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:26   #29
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Re: Advice

G'Day again Lysander,

The most important thing for you (and your wife) to do at this stage is to GO SAILING.

These days the common thing is to take lessons. Frankly, I am not in that camp for folks with limited funds. IMO, the easiest and least expensive means of getting o n the water and learning the basics is to... go buy a little daysailer and put it in a lake and start sailing it. It doesn't really matter just what boat is is... something that is popular in your area is good because it will be relatively easy to sell when it is time to move on, but we're talking about less than a thousand bucks (+/-). That boat, coupled with a beginners sailing book will teach you the basics of the art.

After a year or so you will be skilled enough to consider a larger boat, and have enough experience to sail one safely in local waters. A trailer sailor is a good next step... basic accommodations and systems to learn on without the expense of a marina berth or mooring. With this boat you can begin to learn the arts of cruising. Things like anchoring, provisioning, chart work and navigation will become necessary and the skills that you develop will morph directly into your next boat, the one that you can go cruising off into the sunset in.

IME, it is foolish to think that you can become a successful cruiser by starting out with the final boat and no knowledge or experience. There are many on this forum who disagree with this philosophy. Many of them are sitting at home banging away on the PC offering advice.

We started out as I described... way back in the '60's. I know it works.

Oh, Ann and I have been cruising full time since 1986 and still love the life.

Cheers,

Jim
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Old 12-11-2012, 03:12   #30
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Hi Lysander, I spent 30 days on a 46' Bahia and got hooked.... As soon as I got back I started research about what I would need to go cruising full time, I am currently taking navigation, diesel, classes, I am getting my VHF license next week, I will do coastal navigation, electricity and first aid in January. I also plan on taking weather precision courses and then going south on a cat to do the SAS classes; I still have to research these... I am also searching all the threads on this forum and reading the different opinions and also making lists, here is what I started: (random order)
Places to go
Tool box
First aid
Things to sell before leaving
Things to find storage for
Cloths
Safety equipment
Spare parts
Food

Most lists have sub categories, like tool box: has general; plumbing, electricity, sewing...

Bottom line... From what I hear and read.... You will never be ready, at some point you just do it :-)
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