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Old 25-08-2003, 09:06   #1
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1980 Hunter 36 - Offshore Capable?

We have stumbled upon a 1980 Hunter 36 that my partner is interested in for some offshore cruising. I've just started my research and am not getting a good feeling from what I am hearing about Hunter reputation. We have not gotten as far as a survey yet but would like other opinions on this year and model

Thank you
Sherrie
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Old 26-08-2003, 18:10   #2
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A boat that is more than 20 years old will probably have some issues to deal with. While older Hunters are not the same as new Hunters they never were sold as a great off shore vessle. Many of the early Hunters were a decent boat "back when they were new".

Any good survey will tell you the specific condition of the boat, but judging by only the brand name means almost nothing in the overall scheme of things. In 20 years boats with great reputations may not share the same history.
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Old 26-08-2003, 19:05   #3
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Sherrie T,

I agree with Paul's statements concerning Hunters. For more information on choosing a cruising boat, you might want to take a look at this site:

http://www.mahina.com/
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Old 27-08-2003, 03:08   #4
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You might want to peruse the Hunter page:
<http://www.hunterowners.com/ref/index.htm?fno=0>
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Old 31-08-2003, 11:34   #5
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Before you buy a Hunter, you may want to read what this surveyor thinks of one........(Not pretty reading)

http://www.yachtsurvey.com/boatreviews/hunter28.htm
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Old 01-06-2009, 19:51   #6
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Hunters

I am in the process of purchasing a Hunter 25 1978. This boat does not have any of the problems listed in the above survey. It does have some short comings like the companion way entrance being small at the bottom. The hull is not thin and the original keel was replaced with a solid lead keel. The previous owners raced her on Long Island Sound and threw up much more sail than the boat is rated for. In fact the boat is some what admired by the racers at the marina. They say the boat can beat the hell out most 30 footers.

But, that survey makes me want to do a through inspection again before I commit to the sale and has me thinking that the 25 Paceship Eastwind would do me better.
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Old 01-06-2009, 20:18   #7
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Rayalyn...the Cherubini designed Hunters have a much batter reputation than the Hunters designed and built later...and I will note that recent vintage Hunters (say about 2003 forward) also are getting a better reputation for build quality. Finally...Pascoe is well known for contrarian views on a lot of subjects...interesting to read...but always get a second opinion and make up your own mind. If you've found a good H25 and it surveys well and suits your purposes, I'd not hesitate to buy it.
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Old 01-06-2009, 20:40   #8
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Hunter 25

I know the hull and decks are fine also the rigging has been beefed up. The guy was sailing with jib from a J24 that is humongous. It was used in 10 to 15 knot winds. The interior of the boat is what needs work. It has not been touched in years and much of it has been stripped out, though, he has most of the material stored. There are fittings for what I believe was a dodger though he knows nothing about it and to make the boat somewhat comfortable to work in the galley a dodger is needed especially on rainy days. I have lot of work to restore the wood on the boat though none needs replacing. I plan to get rid or maybe keep as spare the 5hp Johnson and use a Tohatsu 6hp four stoke with a generator.
I need to get the boat ready to travel the ICW. My target date to depart is Sept. 22nd. I may have to do only the work absolutely needed at the present yard, as every place I check up here for a slip will not allow you work on your boat. Also, not much for monthly rates, most want seasonal regardless of when the dockage starts. Because of the yards not allowing work is causing me to hesitate. If not for that fact I’d have the boat already.
All in all, the price is right. He wants to unload the boat and start sailing his new catboat
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Old 02-06-2009, 07:17   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SherrieT View Post
We have stumbled upon a 1980 Hunter 36 that my partner is interested in for some offshore cruising. I've just started my research and am not getting a good feeling from what I am hearing about Hunter reputation. We have not gotten as far as a survey yet but would like other opinions on this year and model

Thank you
Sherrie
I would not categorize them as "offshore" boats. I'm sure that there are examples of people circumnavigating with them but my impression is that they are a bit lightly constructed for that purpose. On the other hand, they make fine coastal cruisers at a very reasonable price-point.
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:18   #10
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RayAllyn....sounds like you're not planning on getting a survey. Bad idea given your plans and lack of knowledge about boat construction. What you don't know can hurt you or worse.
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Old 04-06-2009, 09:24   #11
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Before you buy a Hunter, you may want to read what this surveyor thinks of one........(Not pretty reading)

Boat Review* by David Pascoe - Hunter 28
Ouch.
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Old 09-06-2009, 12:51   #12
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Hunters from the 80s

SherriT,
I sailed a 1980/81 hunter and it was a very interesting sail. The deck to hull joint wasn't fastened properly. Instead of thru-bolts every 6 inches or so it had a screws every 3 feet. I found this out when I went down below and saw daylight coming through the deck to hull joint as the boat flexed under sail. This was original from the factory. Basically the only thing keeping it together was the 5200/or what ever they bonded it with. I believe the Hunters you got to worry about is the 1980s -they used cheaper resin, even the fasteners looked like they rummaged from the bottom of a tool box (screws not matching, hinges different), there just wasn't any consistency on quality. They may of put out a good one here and there but on a whole it was terrible workmanship. Sorry to say all this, good luck on your boat search.

Erika

PS. some deck to hull joints are fastened with screws but it is spaced much closer and there would also be reinforcement points (thru-bolted) at high load areas.
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Old 09-06-2009, 12:58   #13
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Just wanted to add to my post that I'm talking about the 1980s hunters, the new Hunter are very well put together, The new owner of Hunter recognized he would have to put out a good quality boat to overcome the lousy rep from the 80s.
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Old 09-06-2009, 14:01   #14
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Hunters are great boats to kick around in, spend a few days on in fairly protected waters. They are not offshore boats. that is not to say that you can't take Hunters offshore, it simply means they are designed as an inexpensive boat primarily for the charter fleets and for weekending. The Cherubini designed boats--the older Hunters from the 70's are good sailing boats. The new boats simply became more focused on dockside partying, and chartering. Not to offend any Hunter owners: they are huge below and have great galleys and sleep a bunch of people. But they have poor to no ventilation, narrow to no side decks, light, undersized rigs, etc. Like every design there is a distinct purpose and for Hunters it is not offshore sailing.
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Old 09-06-2009, 14:50   #15
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I have a 81 H27 that has been in my family since 1985. Out of all I read above, the only critism I would agree with is soft rudder and a somewhat light rig. The fiberglass throught is stiff and solid feeling , hull to deck joint no problem. We are presently looking at 32-41' boats and Hunter is at top of list.
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