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Old 23-09-2015, 07:02   #16
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Re: 1970s Tartan

Tartan 34 info:

Tartan 34

Tartan 34 | Blue Water Sailing
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Old 23-09-2015, 07:40   #17
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Re: 1970s Tartan

The ad says "$6000" firm. The owner probably has that much into the paint job unless he did it himself, not likely with Awlgrip. When I see that Awlgrip, fresh bottom paint and interior I think... 200 hours of work and $1000 worth of materials.

I'll take it for $4000! Four years ago I looked for a Tartan project boat for eight months and could not find a single example like this one within an eight hour drive. These are highly sought after boats, of the 550 made 475 are still sailing and they are well worth putting big money into a restoration.

Interesting that thomm225 bought his Bristol 27 without an engine needing lots of work for $2000 and thinks a Tartan 34C should cost the same with fresh Awlgrip and interior. That is what they call "pride of ownership "
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Old 23-09-2015, 07:41   #18
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Re: 1970s Tartan

Tartans are excellent, and once restored you could take her anywhere. At that age I'd be very curious about the chain plates. My dad owned hull #2 tartan 37. They had chain plate failure on one of the shrouds.
The big thing to consider is if you have the time and energy for restoration. A well surveyed, good condition boat will still be lots of work to get her the way you like it. Restorations can really help you get to know your boat but after buying many fixer uppers I'd go with the ready to sail off condition, even if it means waiting longer to save up the purchase price. Another concideration is the higher quality boat, the less breakage you will have.
Have fun boat shopping :-)
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Old 23-09-2015, 08:00   #19
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Re: 1970s Tartan

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Originally Posted by Azul View Post
The ad says "$6000" firm. The owner probably has that much into the paint job unless he did it himself, not likely with Awlgrip. When I see that Awlgrip, fresh bottom paint and interior I think... 200 hours of work and $1000 worth of materials.

I'll take it for $4000! Four years ago I looked for a Tartan project boat for eight months and could not find a single example like this one within an eight hour drive. These are highly sought after boats, of the 550 made 475 are still sailing and they are well worth putting big money into a restoration.

Interesting that thomm225 bought his Bristol 27 without an engine needing lots of work for $2000 and thinks a Tartan 34C should cost the same with fresh Awlgrip and interior. That is what they call "pride of ownership "
You certainly read a lot into my post. Did you learn reading on Harkers Island? Ha ha

My boat had a 352 lb, 10 hp, Bukh diesel in it when I bought it. It was loaded with equipment also 5 anchors, (to include one 20lb CQR, one big Bruce, two sets of anchor rode and heavy chain), GPS (2), depth, 2 almost new jibs etc.

Mine sat on the hard for 5 years, but I splashed it within 3 weeks of purchase and it went from there. The PO had passed but he did a two year cruise from Massachusetts to Florida before he left the boat in Virginia on his return trip

Before his cruised he had gone over the boat thoroughly. I have noticed new hoses on the cockpit drains, new stuffing box packing, replacement parts on the rigging and mast etc.

I've put about $7,000 in it over 4 years including the $2,000 purchase price.

I bought this boat to get educated on monohulls. My only other sailing experience had been racing (and maintaining) beach cats for 15 years. I had planned to buy another boat by now but haven't found the exact one I want yet. Plus this boat seems to be able to handle anything I put it through. The boat or it's equipment have saved my ASS several times over these last few years also.

It is definitely educating me..............
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Old 23-09-2015, 08:12   #20
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Re: 1970s Tartan

We sailed a Tartan 34c for about ten years. They are great sailing boats well set up for skinny water. If you buy one, it's important to check for soft decks and the integrity of the chainplate knees. Decks are easier to repair than the knees. If you plan to keep the boat at a marina, you will want to replace/upgrade the wiring. Also, the centerboard pivot design is poor and results in the centerboard "drooping" when the pivot arm is pulled up. (It's hard to tell without knowing the position of the pivot arm but the boat in question could be showing the droop in the picture in the slings.) The fix is well-described on the Tartan 34 web site (Home - TARTAN 34 CLASSIC ASSOCIATION).

As far as this particular boat goes, I'm not enthused about the self-tacking jib. These boats were designed for overlapping genoas with the centerboard used to balance the helm. While the awlgrip is nice, there is going to be a lot of money put into the repower, the cushions, the canvas and the inevitable stuff that comes up on the survey. I would either look for a boat that was ready to sail while you worked on it in the off season or try to find one where you weren't paying for a shiny finish.
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Old 23-09-2015, 08:40   #21
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Re: 1970s Tartan

"I paid $2,000 for my Bristol and have done no structural work on it so far, but have sailed it for 4 years now. I have about $7,000 in it which includes solar panels, inverters, new main**, new outboard**, outboard bracket**, two bottom jobs**, (bottom and topside paint**), several boat lift charges**."

Yes, I am a slow reader. In fact I was 32 before I finished my education Too bad you have so much money in your 27 footer. I've got that much in my 34, but I have a newish diesel. It came with new radar, new AC, roller furling, new chart plotter, etc etc.

It is quite sensible to look for a boat that is already in good condition, unless you don't want to go sailing right away, want a certain boat in a certain condition and like to work on boats.

Where does one put two inverters on a 27 foot boat? I thought you were a racer, what's up with the old-timey full keel boat?? j/k
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Old 23-09-2015, 08:59   #22
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Re: 1970s Tartan

Quote:
Originally Posted by Azul View Post
"I paid $2,000 for my Bristol and have done no structural work on it so far, but have sailed it for 4 years now. I have about $7,000 in it which includes solar panels, inverters, new main**, new outboard**, outboard bracket**, two bottom jobs**, (bottom and topside paint**), several boat lift charges**."

Yes, I am a slow reader. In fact I was 32 before I finished my education Too bad you have so much money in your 27 footer. I've got that much in my 34, but I have a newish diesel. It came with new radar, new AC, roller furling, new chart plotter, etc etc.

It is quite sensible to look for a boat that is already in good condition, unless you don't want to go sailing right away, want a certain boat in a certain condition and like to work on boats.

Where does one put two inverters on a 27 foot boat? I thought you were a racer, what's up with the old-timey full keel boat?? j/k
Actually three inverters! I had an 800 watt ac inverter but blew it up somehow. I may have shorted it out trying to plug something in when big waves were about.

I then bought a 400 watt and a 1500 watt but haven't used the 1500 watt inverter yet. I have the 400 near the aft port cabin bulkhead wired directly into one of my two batteries I have in parallel. I mainly use it to charge my laptop, phone, and Verizon Jetpak for internet. (and my fan)

I have a 100 watt solar panel feeding those batteries thru a $12.00 controller. (I bought a spare controller. Another $12.00!)

I WAS a racer!! I have enough Cups, plaques, plates etc. Plus there are racers and there are racers. You can be King Sh!t in one area (Mississippi, Tennessee) racing Hobie 16's then be back at the bottom of the pile in another area (Pensacola, Ft Walton Beach) and have to be born again. Then when you start winning there they change the boat design so you buy another boat, and it keeps going.

I used to hang out with these characters that all had "old-timey full keel boats" in Pensacola and I just sorta got hooked. Then I saw this boat and asked about it. It didn't even have a For Sale sign on it!

I finished my education at 33. Funny thing. Btw, That Harkers Islander accent sorta reminded me of home when I went to the movies over there one night back in the 70's..............

Also, I'm thinking $7,000 is not a lot of money to put into a sailboat over 4 years while at the same time sailing it.
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