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Old 02-02-2010, 09:59   #16
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Curm,
did a little bit of research.... The Morris Yacht.. a good quality boat but for information sake.. the ocean series 42 sells for 748K - as a new boat.. the M series sells for a little less at 689k as a base price..
so now lets look back at your numbers and a couple older Morris Yachts.. I saw a 38 foot in a 1994 vintage for a price of 349K.. so a 15 year old Morris has a value of somewhere around 50% of its origional value and a loss of around 300 to 400k..
Now there is a difference between the 38 and the 42 but you still see a great loss over time..
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Old 02-02-2010, 11:06   #17
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Curm,
did a little bit of research.... The Morris Yacht.. a good quality boat but for information sake.. the ocean series 42 sells for 748K - as a new boat.. the M series sells for a little less at 689k as a base price..
so now lets look back at your numbers and a couple older Morris Yachts.. I saw a 38 foot in a 1994 vintage for a price of 349K.. so a 15 year old Morris has a value of somewhere around 50% of its origional value and a loss of around 300 to 400k..
Now there is a difference between the 38 and the 42 but you still see a great loss over time..
My guess is that a Morris Justine sold for around 275-300K or so 1985. However, you have to take inflation into account, so that 275K may be well over 300K in today's dollars.

Look at the Wauquiez Hoods. They sold new for way below their value in the 1980s, due in part to the favorable exchange rate, yet a used MK2 in top condition can fetch 125-150K today.

I would still argue that boats built to last hold their value better. They are also safer and easier to maintain (because things don't break as easily).

However, IMHO you have to look at boats on a case by case basis. Was it well maintained? Were the systems upgraded with good quality components?

Frankly if I were Captain Nathan I'd also look at multi hulls. I saw a nice 35 ft Fontaine Pajot on Yachtworld for 140K.

As for monohulls, I did a search for 35-42 ft cruising boats, 100K to 150K, and there were nearly 600 boats for sale in the USA alone, encompassing just about every marque and type of boat under the sun. I saw at least 50 boats I'd love to own LOL.
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Old 02-02-2010, 11:14   #18
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Well, when I look on Yachtworld I see three 36 foot Morris Justines for sale, a 1995 for 278K, a 1986 for 239K and a 1989 at 229K. A brand new Hunter 39 is $195,900 according to the latest issue of Cruising World. Plus, when the Hunter leaves the showroom it loses 20% of its value immediately.

Am I missing something?
yes, because this question wasn't about boats that are $200k+
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Old 02-02-2010, 12:15   #19
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I think you missed my point, which was generic.
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Old 02-02-2010, 12:43   #20
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You say you are new to recreational sailing. Couple of thoughts for you. Do not view this upcoming purcase as "your last boat" or "the one". You are making an investment, not getting married. There are dozens if not hundreds of boats that will meet your stated needs.

Your needs will change with experience (and time). Your wants (both of you) will also change. Charter boats that look appealing. Charter monos, multis, motorsailers. Get some experience doing it. Then survey the market, make your choice and live with it till you wish to do something differently. Buy something with resale value and look on it as a learning experience. Then move on. In sailing you must enjoy the journey.
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Old 02-02-2010, 15:26   #21
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Too much character?

Have you considered steel?

There should be quite a few good ones (no interior rust!!!) available within your budget, they do take quite well to beginners (don't buy one with new two pack paint) and some will have been much loved for a long time.

I can see why they might have too much character though.
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Old 02-02-2010, 15:29   #22
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Originally Posted by Randyonr3 View Post
Curm,
did a little bit of research.... The Morris Yacht.. a good quality boat but for information sake.. the ocean series 42 sells for 748K - as a new boat.. the M series sells for a little less at 689k as a base price..
so now lets look back at your numbers and a couple older Morris Yachts.. I saw a 38 foot in a 1994 vintage for a price of 349K.. so a 15 year old Morris has a value of somewhere around 50% of its origional value and a loss of around 300 to 400k..
Now there is a difference between the 38 and the 42 but you still see a great loss over time..
Not a good comparison. The Morris 38 was built 15 years ago and probably cost around the $350,000 mark,probably less. They really do hold their value. A Hinckley Bermuda 40 Mark III was $120,000 in the mid 70's. The same boat today if in good shape is probably around $250,000.
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Old 02-02-2010, 15:53   #23
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Here's a great boat that will sell between $100,000 and $150,000.
http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1969.../United-States

John Kretschmer wrote in his Used Boat Notebook :
"If you have $150,000 to spend would you rather have a beautifully reconditioned 1975 B40 or a new 32 foot ABC production boat ? Which boat will be worth more in five years ? Which boat would you rather sail ? "
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Old 05-02-2010, 00:10   #24
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Thanks for your reply
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Old 05-02-2010, 00:24   #25
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Dear All

Thanks for your replies, they have all been very helpful. Last week I saw a couple I really liked at the Seattle Boat Show but to be honest, a new 40' yacht is a little pricey first time out.

So we are heading over to the East Coast next month to look at a few.

Once again thanks for all your replies...and happy and safe sailing.

Thanks,

Nathan
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Old 05-02-2010, 00:37   #26
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As you will be gathering very quickly, views on boats are a very varied and personal thing ... a bit like views on beauty.

One thing that may help you choose is to come to your own view on medium vs. heavy displacement yachts. Again, a point of strong views.

You understand the sea, and seem interested some serious sailing, so a good read that has lots of good stuff on cruising boat characteristics and fitout is Beth Leonard's 'The Voyager's Handbook'. She must have very large hands ... It is a tome in weight, and a veritable bible in content. By memory Hal Roth (How to sail around the world), and Nigel Calder (Cruising Handbook) also have some excellent advice.
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Old 05-02-2010, 09:30   #27
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If you will be looking on the East Coast, generally speaking you will find boats in the Northeast to be in better condition. Florida has the most boats for sale, but the sun can age them really quickly, along with being in the water 365 days a year.

Good luck!
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