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Old 27-07-2003, 10:14   #1
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Unhappy No takers?

At some point in my life I want to sail to the Antartic in summer. I hear some of the research stations rather enjoy meeting people slightly crazier than they are.

Antartica.What a beautiful place it is. I'd love to go.

A steel hull has to be the only option.

Maybe the heat is getting to me in Arizona
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Old 27-07-2003, 15:18   #2
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Just for the record, while a properly constructed steel hulled boat is one possible construction approach to going to the Arctic or Antarctic, a purpose built kevlar sheathed wood or composite hull will actually be sturdier with a lot less weight. Few normal steel hulled boat are constructed with enough strength to withstand the loads of a collision with ice or compression of being iced in and so you would be constructing a purpose built boat in either case. Getting to and from the antartic requires a heavy thrash and you would do better in those conditions with the lighter weight of the composite boat. The composite boat of equal level of finish to the steel boat should be less expensive, easier to build and easier to resell should you ever decide to do so.

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Old 28-07-2003, 09:53   #3
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Thanks. Can the kevlar offer wood finish be done by one's self? Expensive? I prefer wood, anyway. Bookbinding is an semi-endless array of laminates as well.

PAUL
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Old 28-07-2003, 11:59   #4
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An amatuer can definitely build a Kevlar over plywood, cold molded veneers or over strip planked hull. Kevlar requires vacuum bagging because Kevlar is lighter than the resin and tends to float out resing if not vaccuum bagged. The good news about vacuum bagging is that it produces a denser, more properly balanced laminate that requires less sanding. While Kevlar fabric is not inexpensive, with the military and crash helmet industries using so much Kevlar the price has come way down. When a company like Hunter can afford to use Kevlar in the crash zones of their newer models, it must have gotten less expensive. You are also using such a small amount that while it will add significantly to the price of the hull, in the overall picture it adds only a small percentage to the overall cost of the boat.

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Old 30-09-2003, 16:35   #5
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Polar Cruise

I'd love to do that, I keep a nice globe right here on my credenza & often eyeball it with potential cruises in mind. One thing that keeps catching my eye is a potential northern cruise east to west from the Hudson Bay to the Beaufort Sea & around Alaska to the west coast (or the other way around, I’m easy). I'll readily admit that I've done no reading about those waters though, & have no idea whether or not they’re navigable at all or for an annual period sufficient for a crossing (without a freakin’ icebreaker & (or) a dog team & lots of turkey jerky).

I'd say that the extent of my knowledge there is more of an assumption, i.e. that subs go under the pack for good reason. The rest (to me) is exploration that I will eventually address through reading or perhaps someday by actually going.

One last thing, you mention "research stations rather enjoy meeting people slightly crazier than they are”. No doubt you have your share of people that think you’re slipping your clutch … so be it, let ‘em think what they think. One of my primary motivations for cruising is to maybe leave behind those that gently advise me to seek help, & soon. I strongly suspect that I’m not going to find many of those that “get it” by hanging out around here.

You’re not nuts, just a bit more interesting than average,

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Old 03-10-2003, 01:03   #6
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Polar Cruise

Sail_the_Stars ... a fun little read for you ...

http://www.latitude38.com/features/Siberia.htm

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Old 29-11-2003, 22:28   #7
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Once again the wrong pole (for you, anyway), but still interesting & useful. Maybe you'll beat me to similar antarctic resources ... I'm still chasing off weekend house guests.

http://ice-glaces.ec.gc.ca/App/WsvPa...?ID=1&Lang=eng

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Old 03-12-2003, 09:19   #8
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Northwest Passage

I read a book a couple of years ago about a group of three or four wackos that sailed from the Atlantic north and west to Alaska. They had a 27' steel sailboat (didn't sail worth a damn - motored mostly). It was a long cold trip. What struck me was the fact that even far offshore, the water was shallow. They drew less than 4 feet and often were far from shore due to depth. They had to stay as close to shore as possible since the wind blew fiercely from shore and the waves built up fast. I'd love to do it in my boat (that's why I bought the book) , but I draw 6 feet, so unless someone dredges, I can't make it.

They went on a good year with less ice, but still fought ice most of the way.

The way I see it, with global warming and the lessening of the ice pack (and the corresponding raising of the ocean), I might make it in a few hundred years.

If you'd like the name of the book, I'll try to find it.

Jeff,
a friend is finishing a 39-foot cold molded boat of his design. What a strong boat! I helped him laminate the hull with strips of ply and epoxy. After I left, he applied Kevlar to both the inside and outside of the bow for collision protection. I don't think he had any trouble with the Kevlar floating for the small area.
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