Cruisers Forum
 


Join CruisersForum Today

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 23-06-2013, 01:09   #91
Registered User
 
Teknav's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Texas - USA
Boat: Twin Otter de Havilland Floatplane
Posts: 1,838
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Hi Jammer! Clarifying...In the US, you have to be under the care of a Medical Provider to legally be injected with a drug. (Physician, DO, Dentist, Pharmacist, Nurse Practitioner, PA, RN...if you want to be too technical about it.) With the exception of being a MD/DO, all others medical providers have DEA license limitations. Put differently, Birth and Death Certificates can ONLY be signed by a Medical Doctor or a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine.

Mauritz
__________________

__________________
Retired - Don't Ask Me To Do A Damn Thing!
Teknav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23-06-2013, 01:46   #92
Registered User
 
Teknav's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Texas - USA
Boat: Twin Otter de Havilland Floatplane
Posts: 1,838
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Hi LaVida! I am not aware if there is an equivalent of the TWIC ID card, outside the US. Some captains do a discrete thorough search of the crew's belongings, prior to boarding; it is a necessary evil. Besides your valid passport, a return ticket to your home airport, and a second government issued ID, non-US citizen can just hope for a less restrictive captain to give you a chance at crewing. Acceptable arrangements should also be made, if a medical intervention is needed. Cruise ships contact previous employers to verify your background, prior to hiring. Crewing on a boat is not the same as working for a cruise ship.

If a captain solicits a crew without discussing the mentioned documentations and verification, a would-be crew should be very suspicious. A legitimate US captain must have a TWIC ID card. A red flag is raised when someone sells everything back home, leaves his roots behind and would want to crew to anywhere for any duration at a given short notice.

Mauritz
__________________

__________________
Retired - Don't Ask Me To Do A Damn Thing!
Teknav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2013, 15:05   #93
Registered User
 
Ajohnst13's Avatar

Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 6
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Hi my name is Andrew i am currently the first mate on a 52 foot S/Y out of northeast harbor maine , im very interested in being a part of a good team and crew for the winter months . If interested let me know i can send my resume to you. ready to fly out .
__________________
Ajohnst13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2013, 07:36   #94
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 14
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Teknav, I agree that some due diligence by both parties is advised. But, as I understand it TWIC is an MTSA thing and relates to large commercial passenger vessels, cargo ships, and the ports that handle them.

In general I think most here are discussing cruising in the realm of privately owned boats for pleasure and not large commercial operations. Most in that comunity wouldn't have, and would not be able to get a TWIC ID as they are not (T)ransportation (W)orkers...

It would be a bit like random people showing up at the airport saying they want to apply for a SIDA access badge because they want to be able to go out on the ramp unescorted and be around the planes.


Quote:
Can employers require their employees to enroll for a TWIC even if their job does not require them to have unescorted access to facilities and vessels regulated by Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA)? (homeport.uscg.mil)
  • No. All applicants must certify that they need a TWIC to perform their job. Applicants either have to currently be, or are applying to be, a person requiring unescorted access to secure areas of maritime facilities and vessels regulated by MTSA; or they are a commercial HME driver licensed in Canada or Mexico. Applicants also certify that the information they provide during the enrollment process is true, complete, and correct. If required, civil or criminal action may be taken if an individual provides false statements (per 49 CFR 1570.5 and 18 U.S.C. 1001). (homeport.uscg.mil)
__________________
Luke_Y is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2013, 16:43   #95
JMR
Registered User

Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 22
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

I have crewed on several passages and here is what I have learned.

One or more face to face is important. There are instances when that's not possible. There are multiple other means of communication such as email, chat, video chat, phone. The important thing is to establish a conversation thread long enough to discuss multiple topics including expectations, plans, routines, thoughts about various things important on the sail. Details about safety, food, entertainment, navigation, habitability, routine, skills & learning, behavioral norms, attitudes, watch routines, weather, communications, experience & "war stories" ,emergencies, health, and any thing else you can think of. The more topics covered and the more details discussed, the more opportunity you have to learn about your perspective boat-mate, whether crew or captain.

I have also worked several deliveries. Deliveries are slightly different. As crew, you would expect the captain to behave in a more professional manner. That is, disclose to you detailed information such that you would have a very good idea of what to expect throughout the entire delivery experience. You should expect straight answers to all your questions. As captain, you should expect the same from perspective crew members.

The key is how well you can communicate, how well you are in tune with each other, and how comfortable you are with each other's skills and experience. A passage requires careful planning and preparation for both crew and captain. You need to gauge the quality of the planning and degree of preparation. There is lots to talk about, and all that talking would give you a pretty good idea as to how you will get along on an extended sail.
__________________
JMR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 29-09-2013, 10:37   #96
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Apalachicola, North Florida
Boat: 1969 Morgan 28, Stiletto 27
Posts: 171
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

I would ask what kind of captains/crews he had been with before. If he talks about a bunch of SOBs or lots of great people, your name will probably be added to the list, either way.

In talking about the vessel, is he talking food, video players, and marinas, or sail condition, drive train, and spares? Obvious choice.

I have had a lot of paid crew members. I used to pass by the engine room vent often on the first day. Potheads think the engine room exhaust fan makes the pot smoke disappear.

I disagree on a minor point with a prospective crew member. How he handles that is a good indication of what is to come.

I find that slightly distant, job oriented crew members last best. Someone who shows all his cards on the first hand has nowhere to go but down.
__________________
Bestathook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 05:27   #97
Registered User

Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 8
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

It is great to hear that there is still someone out there who can evaluate a person through conversation also not only because fancy degrees and papers in hand. A good judge of character gets to know a person within 20 minutes talk easily, not all people are as much opened but generally I mean.
__________________
LadyMarion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2013, 14:40   #98
Registered User
 
Feral Cat's Avatar

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Southern California...s/v Feral Cat Catalina 38' S&S design
Boat: Catalina 38' S&S design
Posts: 66
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Whether crew or captain, I just learned the HARD way.

My future with prospective crew will be a minimum overnight sail! I would prefer a sail that tests the capability of the captain and boat (Even if me the captain/my boat) Now we may need to work up to this as far as a capability to stand watch perspective, but we must encounter some ADVERSITY together. This will also provide the crew to demonstrate their capabilities in the REAL WORLD, everything else is just talk.

I had the pleasure of racing the transpac (13 day crossing) with a VERY accomplished captain (On paper) many signals noticed prior to departure by way of this thread info that went uncared for by me... Heck, I wanted to race in the Transpac!

NO REQUIRED pre-race overnight shakedown = Should have been my glowing RED FLAG!

No kidding, he literally would panic, scream and yell on almost every watch that he had (Which ruins off watch sleep)! No other crew member ever got remotely that shook up with what i consider typical coastal cruising type weather. Was just terrible! We made the voyage in spite of him not because of him, really was a VERY MISERABLE time.I won't even discuss his barbaric and ill social skills (Lack of just basics) Really! Being on a 40' boat is not the place to learn these kind of issues.

So, the lesson for me: life is very different on the ocean in real life scenarios, only way I can think of learning how folks will react is to get as close to real life as possible.

Get out and do it for real = People are different when faced with adversity!

I for one will NEVER get on a boat with that individual ever again!

But hey, we finished the race. I only now can understand why Newt/Boatman enjoy sailing alone for the transits, is how I am thinking after this life changing affair!

Me, not entirely out yet and even thinking would love to crew for the next Transpac, after doing what I have posted here. GLTY
__________________
Wayne
==
Feral Cat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-11-2013, 02:25   #99
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 57
Images: 5
Send a message via Yahoo to kiwiladysailor Send a message via Skype™ to kiwiladysailor
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

On two occasions I flew to America at my own cost, to sail with boat owners who were looking for share expenses paying crew. They both looked really good on paper/ on the internet , had lots of experience and both trips appeared to offer amazing voyages ahead.
On both occasions meeting the owners face to face for the first time , as they came to pick me up from the airport gave me an instant feeling of dread and regret . I continued with both trips as I had come so far for these so called journeys of a life time. My gut feeling from my first meetings is something I should have listened to, both lots of boat owners were disasters , simply horrible and calculating people. Both were thoroughly capable captains/skippers . Safety boat wise was not an issue , but the personalities of the skippers and the expectations of them were highly unreasonable , ( sex from one and drunken verbal and physical abuse from another ) not only of me, but on both yachts to all paying crew aboard. On both voyages it became clear to all crew on board that we were there only for what money we gave the skippers for the trip . They selected crew specifically from outside America so when we arrived it would be very hard to turn back . There seem to be quite a few old sailors out there with no money to sail their boats , a nice gullible crew of four with $30 a day each to give hoping for an adventure of a lifetime, can be an easy catch with the lure of the Caribbean or Mexico .
Its easy to say look people in the eye , talk for twenty minutes ..... etc. Sometimes you might not know what you miss if you walk away , people wanting to sail are naturally of adventurous spirit knowing they need to get on with people. Some boat owners feel empowered in their own little kingdom and think those that join them have no rights or no right to expect respect. These boat owners did not want to be with people really , they just could not afford to sail without people paying to go along with them.
I would warn to be extra cautious in that type of situation.
I sail often with different groups of friends, mostly on boats we share charter together. We all are equal , as in no one owns that boat. Its the best way , unless its an employment situation.
Some hardy old sea dogs don't recognise we are not all as they are , if we were we would have our own boats , and be hardy old sea dogs ourselves.
Needless to say on both voyages mentioned, all crew including me jumped ship when it got too much for them .
Happy to crew on happy boats with happy captain always ...
I WOULD LIKE TO THANK ALL THE DECENT AND RESPECTABLE SKIPPERS OUT THERE WHO CAN AND DO MAKE SAILING A REAL PLEASURE AND A GREAT WAY OF LIFE FOR THOSE OF US WHO DONT HAVE OUR OWN BOATS BUT LOVE TO SHARE SAILING EXPERIENCES WITH THEM . MY LIST OF WONDERFUL SKIPPERS WHO ARE A PLEASURE TO BE WITH IS LONG .
__________________
kiwiladysailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-12-2013, 08:56   #100
Registered User

Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 2
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

These are really great forum posts. I've only just joined Cruisers Forum and it seems like a good 'place' with lots of common sense and good humour. I hope if I do get to crew, that it will be with someone as nice as the people on here.
__________________
ELISE1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-12-2013, 12:33   #101
Nearly an old salt
 
goboatingnow's Avatar

Cruisers Forum Supporter

Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 13,649
Images: 3
Kiwilsdysailor. I sympathise with your predicaments in the past . It happened to once even I was younger and looking for longer distance sailing opportunities. It's not nice to be taken advantage off , ( in any way). And the Sex thing is more common then might first appear. Anyone whose sailed a lot and hung round the usual crossroads sees women put into uncomfortable positions by " chancers " luckily little comes of it but bad feeling. It demeans all us as skippers and those in control of crew


Dave
__________________
Check out my new blog on smart boat technology, networking and gadgets for the connected sailor! - http://smartboats.tumblr.com
goboatingnow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15-12-2013, 13:52   #102
Registered User

Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 57
Images: 5
Send a message via Yahoo to kiwiladysailor Send a message via Skype™ to kiwiladysailor
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Thanks Dave for your comment . I know well enough that it goes both ways , there are some crew who I have sailed with that were good at the bar before sail away , that very quickly became dangerous morons at sea. Of course a nightmare for the skipper and the rest of the crew ,when a crew member is unreliable. Its fair to say it is always a gamble both ways , thats why people have to be very careful. Check up very well who you crew with and who you sail with. If you have come from long away , be prepared always to walk away from the boat if things don't look right. If someone seems bit off when you first meet them , it won't get any better when you are at sea. Thats my motto these days . There is always a better boat to crew on out there , you just need the confidence and patience to find it.
__________________
kiwiladysailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2014, 02:35   #103
Registered User

Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

it is great test! Thanks a lot! It will be made not only for sailors but for other men with which you planning your business/relations too!
__________________
ian1961 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17-01-2014, 06:58   #104
Moderator Emeritus
 
GordMay's Avatar

Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario - 48-29N x 89-20W
Boat: (Cruiser Living On Dirt)
Posts: 31,507
Images: 240
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Greetings and welcome aboard the CF, ian1961.
__________________
Gord May
"If you didn't have the time or money to do it right in the first place, when will you get the time/$ to fix it?"



GordMay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-01-2014, 19:16   #105
Registered User

Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 5
Re: Checklist For Voluntary Crew

Reading through this post highlights that the "power dynamic" can often be a problem. I wonder if strangers that join to charter a bare boat would have as much trouble with that, since they all would be more equal. But how would you, or could you put a deal like that together? Time, place, experience, etc.
__________________

__________________
sengsational is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
crew, paracelle

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:56.


Google+
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Social Knowledge Networks
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.

ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.